MODEL TEST 20 星火英语英语6级听力直通249分+MP3(含字幕)

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MODEL TEST 20
Section A
Directions: In this section, you will hear
8 short conversations and 2 long conversations.
At the end of each conversation,
one or more questions will be asked
about what was said.
Both the conversation and the questions
will be spoken only once.
After each question there will be a pause.
During the pause, you must read the four choices
marked A), B), C) and D),
and decide which is the best answer.
Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2
with a single line through the centre.
Now, let's begin with the eight short conversations.
11. M: Jane, you know, it is such a huge day to me.
Will you go out eating with me tonight?
W: I will, but before we go
you should agree that we go Dutch.
Q: What does the woman mean?
12. W: How did you like biochemistry?
I've signed up for next semester.
M: It was a breeze. No problem at all.
Q: What does the man think of biochemistry?
13. W: How was your talk with
the manager of the human resources department?
M: It never really got off the ground.
Q: What does the man mean?
14. W: I prefer the personal service
in the smaller shops, besides it's nearer.
M: But the prices there are somewhat higher.
So I do all my shopping at the supermarket
Q: Where does the man usually do his shopping?
15.W: Are you going to hit the books tonight?
M: Oh, just after those tough exams?
Let's forget it,
we'll go to the student union and just hang loose;
have a beer or two and watch the ball game on TV.
Q: What does the man mean?
16. M: This is the worst flood
for the past twenty years.
It has caused much damage and destruction.
W: Look at the prices of fruits and vegetables.
No wonder they are so expensive.
Q: What are they talking about?
17.W: I didn't know Jay spent his weekends
helping out at an old age home.
M: It is a side of him
that he doesn't let other people see.
Q: What do we learn about Jay
from the conversation?
18.W: Dear, you are back.
Where is Ted? Did he learn well?
M: Ah, it was scary.
A dozen times I wanted to yell
"Not so fast! Not so fast!" or
"Look out for that car!"
Anyway, luckily we got through it without an accident.
Q: What are the speakers talking about?
Now you will hear the two long conversations.
Conversation One
M: Where are you going with all those stuffed toys?
W: I'm collecting them for an orphanage.
It's part of a project to get extra credit for school.
If I do 40 hours of volunteer work,
I can get five points added to my final grade.
Besides, I actually like doing it.
M: As if you needed any points added to your grades!
Where do I sign up?
And what kind of projects are there to do?
W: Well, it would be up to your teacher
if she decides to do the same thing as mine.
But there are lots of projects you could do.
You could collect toys or books
or even money for poor children,
help at a food bank or go visit disabled people.
M: Can I help teach?
That's the only thing I can think of.
I don't know
if I'd be very good at visiting people
or handing out food.
But this time
maybe I'll help you with collecting toys or books.
W: Sure. Those people,
children and disabled, are eager to learn.
Well, we're going to hand out the toys
to the children.
And then we may stay awhile
and play with the children.
I've done it before.
It's nice to see the children so happy.
M: All right,
I'll come along and see how it is.
Let's stop by my house.
My brother and sister might have something
they could give away.
Questions 19 to 22 are based on the conversation
you have just heard.
19. Where is the woman going?
20. How many extra credits
will a student get with 40 hours of volunteer work?
21. What will the man do to be a volunteer?
22. What does the man suggest they do first?
Conversation Two
W: Nice to meet you. My name's Jane.
M: Nice to meet you, too. I'm Peter.
W: Have you been in London long?
M: I got here last week.
I guess I've been in the hotel for a week now.
W: I arrived this morning. What's the hotel like?
M: Not perfect, but for this price, not bad.
W: Why? What's the matter with it?
M: Well, the heating doesn't always work;
it was freezing here last night.
And the breakfast is so early,
this morning I overslept and missed it completely!
W: You overslept? Why was that?
M: You'll see, there's another boy in my room
and he snores really badly!
I didn't get a wink of sleep!
W: Oh no! Don't they have the morning-call service?
M: No, I asked the waiter to call me up
but he said I had to pay
one extra pound every day for that.
I think that should be their duty,
not additional service and charge.
W: Well, I agree with you.
So what is the exact time for breakfast?
M: 7 to 8 o'clock. And lunch is from 12:00 to 1:30,
supper 6:30 to 8:00.
W: That's not only early, but all three meals are short.
What do they provide for supper?
Er, I am a vegetarian.
M: The simple fish and chips, pizzas.
Nothing special.
The vegetarian restaurant near Neal's Yard is fairly good.
It's just down the street, by Covent Garden.
W: Oh, Covent Garden. I've heard about it.
A nice place. Thank you.
M: You are welcome.
W: Anyway, I don't know what we can do
about the breakfast, or your roommate,
but why don't you ask the hotel to fix the heating?
M: Hmmm, yes, what a good idea!
Why didn't I think of that?
Questions 23 to 25 are based on the conversation
you have just heard.
23. What does Peter think about the hotel?
24. Where will the woman probably have
supper this evening?
25. What will Peter probably do after the conversation?
Section B
Directions: In this section,
you will hear 3 short passages.
At the end of each passage,
you will hear some questions.
Both the passage and the questions
will be spoken only once.
After you hear a question,
you must choose the best answer
from the four choices marked A), B), C) and D).
Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2
with a single line through the centre.
Passage One
In Britain, arrangements for inviting
and entertaining guests at a wedding are usually
the responsibility of the bride's family.
In most cases it is mainly friends and relations
of both families who are invited.
But when the bride's father is a businessman
of some kind, the wedding reception may provide
a useful occasion for establishing social connections
with clients or customers
and other people whose goodwill
may be of advantage to him.
It is however the bride's mother
who has the job of sending out
the formal printed invitation cards.
In the case of a church wedding,
the priest of each neighborhood
in which the bride and bridegroom live
is formally informed about a month
in advance of the ceremony.
Thus an announcement of the coming wedding
can be made in church on each of three Sundays
before it takes place.
Often up to a hundred or more people
attend the religious service and the bride usually wears
the traditional long white dress and veil,
while her bridesmaids wear long dresses
in attractive colors.
This may also happen in the case of a civil wedding
in a register office but is probably less usual.
The reception which follows may be held in a restaurant,
a local hall or, when there are few guests,
in the bride's home.
Refreshments are provided, a special iced wedding cake
is cut and distributed to the guests,
toasts are drunk and dancing may follow.
At some point in the celebrations the bride goes off
to change into everyday clothes
and then leaves the party with her husband
to go on their honeymoon,
the journey they will make together,
often in romantic surroundings abroad.
Questions 26 to 29 are based on the passage
you have just heard.
26. What arrangements do the bride's parents
normally do?
27. Why may some guests be invited
when the bride's father is a businessman?
28. Why are the arrangements for a church wedding
usually made some time before?
29. Under what circumstance is the reception
normally held in the bride's home?
Passage Two
Have you ever been afraid to talk back
when you were treated unfairly?
Have you ever bought something just because
the salesman talked you into it?
Are you afraid to ask someone for a date?
Many people are afraid to assert themselves.
Dr. Robert,author of
Stand Up, Speak Out, and Talk Back,
thinks it's because their self-respect is low.
"there's always a 'superior' around-
a parent, a teacher, a boss-who 'knows better'."
But Albert and other scientists are doing something
to help people assert themselves.
They offer “assertiveness training” courses.
In the AT course people learn
that they have a right to be themselves.
They learn to speak out and feel good about doing so.
They learn to be aggressive without hurting other people.
In one way, learning to speak out is to overcome fear.
A group taking an AT course will help
the timid person to lose his fear,
But AT uses an even stronger motive-the need to share.
The timid person speaks out in the group
because he wants to tell how he feels.
Whether or not you speak up for yourself
depends on your self-image.
If someone you face is more "important" than you,
you may start to doubt your own good sense.
But why should you?
AT says you can get to feel good about yourself.
And once you do, you can learn to speak out.
Questions 30 to 32 are based on the passage
you have just heard.
30. What is the problem the speaker mainly talks about?
31. Why are some people afraid to
speak out for themselves?
32. What is suggested to the timid persons
to overcome their problem?
Passage Three
Every country tends to accept its own way of life
as being the normal one
and to praise or criticize others as
they are similar to or different from it.
And unfortunately, our picture of the people
and the way of life of other countries
is often a distorted one.
Here is a great argument in favor of
foreign travel and learning foreign languages.
It is only by traveling in, or living in a country
and getting to know its citizens and their language,
that one can find out what a country
and its people are really like.
And the knowledge one gains this way
frequently turns out to be different
from the second-hand information
gathered from other sources.
How often we find that the foreigners
whom we thought to be such different people
from ourselves are not very different after all!
Differences between peoples do, of course exist and,
one hopes, will always continue to do so.
The world will be a dull place indeed
when all the different nationalities behave exactly alike,
and some people might say
that we are rapidly approaching this state of affairs.
With the much greater rapidity and ease of travel,
there might seem to be some truth in this at least
as far as Europe is concerned. However this may be,
at least the greater ease of travel today
has revealed to more people than ever before
that the Englishman or Frenchman or German
is not some different kind of animal from themselves.
Questions 33 to 35 are based on the passage
you have just heard.
33. What will people learn by traveling in a foreign country
and learning its language?
34. What does the speaker think of the knowledge gained
by traveling in a foreign country?
35. What is the result of ease of travel in Europe today?
Section C
Directions: In this section,
you will hear a passage three times.
When the passage is read for the first time,
you should listen carefully for its general idea.
When the passage is read for the second time,
you are required to fill in the blanks
numbered from 36 to 43
with the exact words you have just heard.
For blanks numbered from 44 to 46
you are required to fill in the missing information.
For these blanks, you can either use
the exact words you have just heard
or write down the main points in your own words.
Finally, when the passage is read for the third time,
you should check what you have written.
Now listen to the passage.
For most of us,
the purpose of the holidays is to bring peace,
love, and goodwill towards all.
Yet, for many, the holiday season often means stress,
fatigue, pressure, disappointment and loneliness.
These feelings, often known as the "holiday blues,"
may be even more prevalent,
due to the emotional turmoil of the past few months,
not to mention the unsteady economy.
Experts say even the more ritual tasks of shopping,
decorating, late-night parties,
cooking, planning and family reunions
can be holiday stressors.
In addition, the psychological phenomenon
known as seasonal affective disorder
may bring a specific type of depression
related to winter's shorter days and longer nights.
"Certainly just because it's the holidays
doesn't mean people are going to be happy,"
says Dr. Doug Jacobs of Harvard University.
"And this will be a particularly hard holiday
for some who are dealing with a lost job, debt,
or even a lost loved one.
"With family reunions becoming
less frequent events over the years,
there is now the added pressure
of getting just one chance to get it all right.
"Families are much more disparate now.
The disappointment and sense of alienation
that often results from family gatherings,
is actually a realization that the fantasy is not met,
says John Stutesman,
a clinical psychologist
at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago.
Still, say experts,
the blues should be addressed.
Stutesman says that the most essential step
is for the individual to acknowledge their feelings
and the reason for their withdrawal.
"Denial will only compound the stress they're feeling.
"Stutesman recommends people do things
that are normally comforting
in order to get a handle on the holiday stress.
"If they're feeling a little blue,
they should try to do things personally satisfying for them.
Maybe this is exercise,
cooking, reading a book, or massage."
Now the passage will be read again.
For most of us,
the purpose of the holidays is to bring peace,
love, and goodwill towards all.
Yet, for many, the holiday season often means stress,
fatigue, pressure, disappointment and loneliness.
These feelings, often known as the "holiday blues,"
may be even more prevalent,
due to the emotional turmoil of the past few months,
not to mention the unsteady economy.
Experts say even the more ritual tasks of shopping,
decorating, late-night parties,
cooking, planning and family reunions
can be holiday stressors.
In addition, the psychological phenomenon
known as seasonal affective disorder
may bring a specific type of depression
related to winter's shorter days and longer nights.
"Certainly just because it's the holidays
doesn't mean people are going to be happy,"
says Dr. Doug Jacobs of Harvard University.
"And this will be a particularly hard holiday
for some who are dealing with a lost job, debt,
or even a lost loved one.
"With family reunions becoming
less frequent events over the years,
there is now the added pressure
of getting just one chance to get it all right.
"Families are much more disparate now.
The disappointment and sense of alienation
that often results from family gatherings,
is actually a realization that the fantasy is not met,
says John Stutesman,
a clinical psychologist
at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago.
Still, say experts,
the blues should be addressed.
Stutesman says that the most essential step
is for the individual to acknowledge their feelings
and the reason for their withdrawal.
"Denial will only compound the stress they're feeling.
"Stutesman recommends people do things
that are normally comforting
in order to get a handle on the holiday stress.
"If they're feeling a little blue,
they should try to do things personally satisfying for them.
Maybe this is exercise,
cooking, reading a book, or massage."
Now the passage will be read for the third time.
For most of us,
the purpose of the holidays is to bring peace,
love, and goodwill towards all.
Yet, for many, the holiday season often means stress,
fatigue, pressure, disappointment and loneliness.
These feelings, often known as the "holiday blues,"
may be even more prevalent,
due to the emotional turmoil of the past few months,
not to mention the unsteady economy.
Experts say even the more ritual tasks of shopping,
decorating, late-night parties,
cooking, planning and family reunions
can be holiday stressors.
In addition, the psychological phenomenon
known as seasonal affective disorder
may bring a specific type of depression
related to winter's shorter days and longer nights.
"Certainly just because it's the holidays
doesn't mean people are going to be happy,"
says Dr. Doug Jacobs of Harvard University.
"And this will be a particularly hard holiday
for some who are dealing with a lost job, debt,
or even a lost loved one.
"With family reunions becoming
less frequent events over the years,
there is now the added pressure
of getting just one chance to get it all right.
"Families are much more disparate now.
The disappointment and sense of alienation
that often results from family gatherings,
is actually a realization that the fantasy is not met,
says John Stutesman,
a clinical psychologist
at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago.
Still, say experts,
the blues should be addressed.
Stutesman says that the most essential step
is for the individual to acknowledge their feelings
and the reason for their withdrawal.
"Denial will only compound the stress they're feeling.
"Stutesman recommends people do things
that are normally comforting
in order to get a handle on the holiday stress.
"If they're feeling a little blue,
they should try to do things personally satisfying for them.
Maybe this is exercise,
cooking, reading a book, or massage."
This is the end of listening comprehension.

MODEL TEST 20 Section A Directions: In this section, you will hear 8 short conversations and 2 long conversations. At the end of each conversation, one or more questions will be asked about what was said. Both the conversation and the questions will be spoken only once. After each question there will be a pause. During the pause, you must read the four choices marked A), B), C) and D), and decide which is the best answer. Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2 with a single line through the centre. Now, let's begin with the eight short conversations. 11. M: Jane, you know, it is such a huge day to me. Will you go out eating with me tonight? W: I will, but before we go you should agree that we go Dutch. Q: What does the woman mean? 12. W: How did you like biochemistry? I've signed up for next semester. M: It was a breeze. No problem at all. Q: What does the man think of biochemistry? 13. W: How was your talk with the manager of the human resources department? M: It never really got off the ground. Q: What does the man mean? 14. W: I prefer the personal service in the smaller shops, besides it's nearer. M: But the prices there are somewhat higher. So I do all my shopping at the supermarket Q: Where does the man usually do his shopping? 15.W: Are you going to hit the books tonight? M: Oh, just after those tough exams? Let's forget it, we'll go to the student union and just hang loose; have a beer or two and watch the ball game on TV. Q: What does the man mean? 16. M: This is the worst flood for the past twenty years. It has caused much damage and destruction. W: Look at the prices of fruits and vegetables. No wonder they are so expensive. Q: What are they talking about? 17.W: I didn't know Jay spent his weekends helping out at an old age home. M: It is a side of him that he doesn't let other people see. Q: What do we learn about Jay from the conversation? 18.W: Dear, you are back. Where is Ted? Did he learn well? M: Ah, it was scary. A dozen times I wanted to yell "Not so fast! Not so fast!" or "Look out for that car!" Anyway, luckily we got through it without an accident. Q: What are the speakers talking about? Now you will hear the two long conversations. Conversation One M: Where are you going with all those stuffed toys? W: I'm collecting them for an orphanage. It's part of a project to get extra credit for school. If I do 40 hours of volunteer work, I can get five points added to my final grade. Besides, I actually like doing it. M: As if you needed any points added to your grades! Where do I sign up? And what kind of projects are there to do? W: Well, it would be up to your teacher if she decides to do the same thing as mine. But there are lots of projects you could do. You could collect toys or books or even money for poor children, help at a food bank or go visit disabled people. M: Can I help teach? That's the only thing I can think of. I don't know if I'd be very good at visiting people or handing out food. But this time maybe I'll help you with collecting toys or books. W: Sure. Those people, children and disabled, are eager to learn. Well, we're going to hand out the toys to the children. And then we may stay awhile and play with the children. I've done it before. It's nice to see the children so happy. M: All right, I'll come along and see how it is. Let's stop by my house. My brother and sister might have something they could give away. Questions 19 to 22 are based on the conversation you have just heard. 19. Where is the woman going? 20. How many extra credits will a student get with 40 hours of volunteer work? 21. What will the man do to be a volunteer? 22. What does the man suggest they do first? Conversation Two W: Nice to meet you. My name's Jane. M: Nice to meet you, too. I'm Peter. W: Have you been in London long? M: I got here last week. I guess I've been in the hotel for a week now. W: I arrived this morning. What's the hotel like? M: Not perfect, but for this price, not bad. W: Why? What's the matter with it? M: Well, the heating doesn't always work; it was freezing here last night. And the breakfast is so early, this morning I overslept and missed it completely! W: You overslept? Why was that? M: You'll see, there's another boy in my room and he snores really badly! I didn't get a wink of sleep! W: Oh no! Don't they have the morning-call service? M: No, I asked the waiter to call me up but he said I had to pay one extra pound every day for that. I think that should be their duty, not additional service and charge. W: Well, I agree with you. So what is the exact time for breakfast? M: 7 to 8 o'clock. And lunch is from 12:00 to 1:30, supper 6:30 to 8:00. W: That's not only early, but all three meals are short. What do they provide for supper? Er, I am a vegetarian. M: The simple fish and chips, pizzas. Nothing special. The vegetarian restaurant near Neal's Yard is fairly good. It's just down the street, by Covent Garden. W: Oh, Covent Garden. I've heard about it. A nice place. Thank you. M: You are welcome. W: Anyway, I don't know what we can do about the breakfast, or your roommate, but why don't you ask the hotel to fix the heating? M: Hmmm, yes, what a good idea! Why didn't I think of that? Questions 23 to 25 are based on the conversation you have just heard. 23. What does Peter think about the hotel? 24. Where will the woman probably have supper this evening? 25. What will Peter probably do after the conversation? Section B Directions: In this section, you will hear 3 short passages. At the end of each passage, you will hear some questions. Both the passage and the questions will be spoken only once. After you hear a question, you must choose the best answer from the four choices marked A), B), C) and D). Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2 with a single line through the centre. Passage One In Britain, arrangements for inviting and entertaining guests at a wedding are usually the responsibility of the bride's family. In most cases it is mainly friends and relations of both families who are invited. But when the bride's father is a businessman of some kind, the wedding reception may provide a useful occasion for establishing social connections with clients or customers and other people whose goodwill may be of advantage to him. It is however the bride's mother who has the job of sending out the formal printed invitation cards. In the case of a church wedding, the priest of each neighborhood in which the bride and bridegroom live is formally informed about a month in advance of the ceremony. Thus an announcement of the coming wedding can be made in church on each of three Sundays before it takes place. Often up to a hundred or more people attend the religious service and the bride usually wears the traditional long white dress and veil, while her bridesmaids wear long dresses in attractive colors. This may also happen in the case of a civil wedding in a register office but is probably less usual. The reception which follows may be held in a restaurant, a local hall or, when there are few guests, in the bride's home. Refreshments are provided, a special iced wedding cake is cut and distributed to the guests, toasts are drunk and dancing may follow. At some point in the celebrations the bride goes off to change into everyday clothes and then leaves the party with her husband to go on their honeymoon, the journey they will make together, often in romantic surroundings abroad. Questions 26 to 29 are based on the passage you have just heard. 26. What arrangements do the bride's parents normally do? 27. Why may some guests be invited when the bride's father is a businessman? 28. Why are the arrangements for a church wedding usually made some time before? 29. Under what circumstance is the reception normally held in the bride's home? Passage Two Have you ever been afraid to talk back when you were treated unfairly? Have you ever bought something just because the salesman talked you into it? Are you afraid to ask someone for a date? Many people are afraid to assert themselves. Dr. Robert,author of Stand Up, Speak Out, and Talk Back, thinks it's because their self-respect is low. "there's always a 'superior' around- a parent, a teacher, a boss-who 'knows better'." But Albert and other scientists are doing something to help people assert themselves. They offer “assertiveness training” courses. In the AT course people learn that they have a right to be themselves. They learn to speak out and feel good about doing so. They learn to be aggressive without hurting other people. In one way, learning to speak out is to overcome fear. A group taking an AT course will help the timid person to lose his fear, But AT uses an even stronger motive-the need to share. The timid person speaks out in the group because he wants to tell how he feels. Whether or not you speak up for yourself depends on your self-image. If someone you face is more "important" than you, you may start to doubt your own good sense. But why should you? AT says you can get to feel good about yourself. And once you do, you can learn to speak out. Questions 30 to 32 are based on the passage you have just heard. 30. What is the problem the speaker mainly talks about? 31. Why are some people afraid to speak out for themselves? 32. What is suggested to the timid persons to overcome their problem? Passage Three Every country tends to accept its own way of life as being the normal one and to praise or criticize others as they are similar to or different from it. And unfortunately, our picture of the people and the way of life of other countries is often a distorted one. Here is a great argument in favor of foreign travel and learning foreign languages. It is only by traveling in, or living in a country and getting to know its citizens and their language, that one can find out what a country and its people are really like. And the knowledge one gains this way frequently turns out to be different from the second-hand information gathered from other sources. How often we find that the foreigners whom we thought to be such different people from ourselves are not very different after all! Differences between peoples do, of course exist and, one hopes, will always continue to do so. The world will be a dull place indeed when all the different nationalities behave exactly alike, and some people might say that we are rapidly approaching this state of affairs. With the much greater rapidity and ease of travel, there might seem to be some truth in this at least as far as Europe is concerned. However this may be, at least the greater ease of travel today has revealed to more people than ever before that the Englishman or Frenchman or German is not some different kind of animal from themselves. Questions 33 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard. 33. What will people learn by traveling in a foreign country and learning its language? 34. What does the speaker think of the knowledge gained by traveling in a foreign country? 35. What is the result of ease of travel in Europe today? Section C Directions: In this section, you will hear a passage three times. When the passage is read for the first time, you should listen carefully for its general idea. When the passage is read for the second time, you are required to fill in the blanks numbered from 36 to 43 with the exact words you have just heard. For blanks numbered from 44 to 46 you are required to fill in the missing information. For these blanks, you can either use the exact words you have just heard or write down the main points in your own words. Finally, when the passage is read for the third time, you should check what you have written. Now listen to the passage. For most of us, the purpose of the holidays is to bring peace, love, and goodwill towards all. Yet, for many, the holiday season often means stress, fatigue, pressure, disappointment and loneliness. These feelings, often known as the "holiday blues," may be even more prevalent, due to the emotional turmoil of the past few months, not to mention the unsteady economy. Experts say even the more ritual tasks of shopping, decorating, late-night parties, cooking, planning and family reunions can be holiday stressors. In addition, the psychological phenomenon known as seasonal affective disorder may bring a specific type of depression related to winter's shorter days and longer nights. "Certainly just because it's the holidays doesn't mean people are going to be happy," says Dr. Doug Jacobs of Harvard University. "And this will be a particularly hard holiday for some who are dealing with a lost job, debt, or even a lost loved one. "With family reunions becoming less frequent events over the years, there is now the added pressure of getting just one chance to get it all right. "Families are much more disparate now. The disappointment and sense of alienation that often results from family gatherings, is actually a realization that the fantasy is not met, says John Stutesman, a clinical psychologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. Still, say experts, the blues should be addressed. Stutesman says that the most essential step is for the individual to acknowledge their feelings and the reason for their withdrawal. "Denial will only compound the stress they're feeling. "Stutesman recommends people do things that are normally comforting in order to get a handle on the holiday stress. "If they're feeling a little blue, they should try to do things personally satisfying for them. Maybe this is exercise, cooking, reading a book, or massage." Now the passage will be read again. For most of us, the purpose of the holidays is to bring peace, love, and goodwill towards all. Yet, for many, the holiday season often means stress, fatigue, pressure, disappointment and loneliness. These feelings, often known as the "holiday blues," may be even more prevalent, due to the emotional turmoil of the past few months, not to mention the unsteady economy. Experts say even the more ritual tasks of shopping, decorating, late-night parties, cooking, planning and family reunions can be holiday stressors. In addition, the psychological phenomenon known as seasonal affective disorder may bring a specific type of depression related to winter's shorter days and longer nights. "Certainly just because it's the holidays doesn't mean people are going to be happy," says Dr. Doug Jacobs of Harvard University. "And this will be a particularly hard holiday for some who are dealing with a lost job, debt, or even a lost loved one. "With family reunions becoming less frequent events over the years, there is now the added pressure of getting just one chance to get it all right. "Families are much more disparate now. The disappointment and sense of alienation that often results from family gatherings, is actually a realization that the fantasy is not met, says John Stutesman, a clinical psychologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. Still, say experts, the blues should be addressed. Stutesman says that the most essential step is for the individual to acknowledge their feelings and the reason for their withdrawal. "Denial will only compound the stress they're feeling. "Stutesman recommends people do things that are normally comforting in order to get a handle on the holiday stress. "If they're feeling a little blue, they should try to do things personally satisfying for them. Maybe this is exercise, cooking, reading a book, or massage." Now the passage will be read for the third time. For most of us, the purpose of the holidays is to bring peace, love, and goodwill towards all. Yet, for many, the holiday season often means stress, fatigue, pressure, disappointment and loneliness. These feelings, often known as the "holiday blues," may be even more prevalent, due to the emotional turmoil of the past few months, not to mention the unsteady economy. Experts say even the more ritual tasks of shopping, decorating, late-night parties, cooking, planning and family reunions can be holiday stressors. In addition, the psychological phenomenon known as seasonal affective disorder may bring a specific type of depression related to winter's shorter days and longer nights. "Certainly just because it's the holidays doesn't mean people are going to be happy," says Dr. Doug Jacobs of Harvard University. "And this will be a particularly hard holiday for some who are dealing with a lost job, debt, or even a lost loved one. "With family reunions becoming less frequent events over the years, there is now the added pressure of getting just one chance to get it all right. "Families are much more disparate now. The disappointment and sense of alienation that often results from family gatherings, is actually a realization that the fantasy is not met, says John Stutesman, a clinical psychologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. Still, say experts, the blues should be addressed. Stutesman says that the most essential step is for the individual to acknowledge their feelings and the reason for their withdrawal. "Denial will only compound the stress they're feeling. "Stutesman recommends people do things that are normally comforting in order to get a handle on the holiday stress. "If they're feeling a little blue, they should try to do things personally satisfying for them. Maybe this is exercise, cooking, reading a book, or massage." This is the end of listening comprehension.
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