MODEL TEST 15 星火英语英语6级听力直通249分+MP3(含字幕)

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MODEL TEST 15
Section A
Directions: In this section, you will hear
8 short conversations and 2 long conversations.
At the end of each conversation,
one or more questions will be asked about what was said.
Both the conversation and the questions
will be spoken only once.
After each question there will be a pause.
During the pause,
you must read the four choices marked A), B), C) and D),
and decide which is the best answer.
Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2
with a single line through the centre.
Now, let's begin with the eight short conversations.
11.M: Do you know that Mark turned down the job
that offered by a travel agency?
W: Yeah. The hours were convenient,
but he wouldn't have been able to make ends meet.
Q: Why did Mark refuse to take the job?
12. M: Can we eat somewhere else?
Very few small restaurants like this serve good food.
W: I know, but there isn't anywhere else in this town.
Look, the waiter is coming over for our order.
Q: What do they think about the restaurant?
13. M: John must have been joking
when he said that he was going to live in Boston.
W: Don't be so sure. He told me
that he was looking for an agent to sell his house.
Q: What does the woman think of John?
14. W: How are you able to go out this weekend?
I thought you were supposed to be working.
M: I was able to swing a deal with my coworker
by promising to work the next two weekends in exchange.
Q: What do we learn from the conversation?
15. W: My chemistry project is in trouble
because my partner and I have totally different ideas
about how to proceed.
M: You should try to meet each other half way.
Q: What does the man suggest the woman do?
16. W: Hi, Mike.
What's this music you're listening to?
I feel like I just walked into a Starbucks.
M: Please don't insult me like that
-this is a far cry from the kind of music
they play at your average coffee shop.
Actually, I'm listening to my favorite jazz CD,
by the saxophone player Sonny Rollins.
Q: What does the man mean?
17. M: It seems to me that I've seen
the dark-haired man somewhere before.
W: Sure you have. He checked us
at the book circulation desk just yesterday.
Q: Where does the dark-haired man most probably work?
18. W: What do you think? Are you OK?
M: Well, there is some information that seems to me...
I want to have a thorough checkup and do some tests.
Q: What's the probable relationship
between the two speakers?
Now you will hear the two long conversations.
Conversation One
W: Hi, How can I help you?
M: Yes, I'd like to return this sweater for a refund.
I bought it a week ago.
W: Well, first of all, what seems to be the problem?
M: Well, isn't it obvious by just looking at it?
The first time I washed and dried it,
the thing shrank at least five sizes.
It wouldn't even fit a thin snake.
W: Uh, I see what you mean,
but did you follow the washing instructions?
I think it says here...
yeah... right here on the label to hand wash it
and then dry it on low heat.
M: How was I supposed to know that?
The label is written in Chinese! And something else:
the stitching is coming undone and the color faded
from a nice dark blue to a sea-weed green.
What kind of merchandise are you trying to sell here anyway?
W: Listen, sir. We take a lot of pride in our clothing.
What I can do is allow you
to exchange the sweater for another one.
M: I don't want to exchange it for anything!
I just want my money back!
W: Well, I can give you credit on your next purchase.
Since the item you purchased was on clearance,
we can't give you a refund.
M: A clearance item! No wonder!
Well, I want to talk to the manager.
W: Uh, he's not here at the moment.
M: Look, This is ridiculous.
W: And anyway, you can only return items
with a receipt within six days,
and unfortunately, that was yesterday in your case.
M: Okay, I'll choose another one.
Questions 19 to 21 are based on the conversation
you've just heard.
19. Why did the man want to return the sweater?
20. How did the woman deal with the man's request?
21. What do we learn at the end of the conversation?
Conversation Two
W: Good morning. Can I help you?
M: Yes, please.
I'm a new student and I'd like to
have some information about the accommodation.
W: Right. The university provides two types of accommodation,
halls of residence and self-catering accommodation.
M: How much does it cost for the self-catering accommodation?
W: For a single room, thirty-seven pounds eighty-six per week,
that's about five forty-one a day. For a double room,
it's fifty-two per week.
M: I’d like the self-catering accommodation.
How far is that from the residence to the university?
W: It all depends.
The residence at 110 Palm Street is about one and a half miles
and the Freemen's Common Houses
at William Road are about half a mile.
M: When do I need to apply?
W: Are you an undergraduate or a postgraduate?
M: Undergraduate.
W: Then you should apply for it as soon as possible,
since places in university-owned accommodation are limited
and if you don't apply before the end of the month,
you are not likely to get a place.
M: Could you possibly tell me what to do,
if no vacancy is available?
W: Yes, you may consider private accommodation.
The university runs an Accommodation Information Office
and its staff will help you.
M: Where's the office?
W: In the Students’ Union Building.
M: Whom can I contact?
W: Mr. Underwood.
David Underwood, the manager of
the Accommodation Information Office.
M: Thanks a lot.
W: My pleasure.
Questions 22 to 25 are based on the conversation
you’ve just heard.
22. What does the conversation mainly tell us?
23. How much does a single room cost per day
for the self-catering accommodation?
24. When does a student need to apply
if he or she wants a university-owned accommodation?
25. What can be inferred from the conversation?
Section B
Directions: In this section, you will hear 3 short passages.
At the end of each passage, you will hear some questions.
Both the passage and the questions will be spoken only once.
After you hear a question,
you must choose the best answer
from the four choices marked A), B), C) and D).
Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2
with a single line through the centre.
Passage One
Most people who work in London get a break
of about an hour for lunch.
As they most live too far from home to go back for lunch,
they have to make other arrangements for their midday meal.
Many large companies have a canteen
designed for their employees.
In such canteens the food served is simple but adequate
and although there are a variety of choices,
the number of dishes is small.
The employees themselves fetch their dishes
from a counter at which they are served.
As there are so many people at work in London,
there are numerous cafes and restaurants in every area
that is not purely residential.
A meal may cost anything
from a modest sum to quite a few pounds,
depending on the restaurant and the food chosen.
Moreover, one can generally get a meal,
or at least a snack, in a pub.
A number of well-known caterers run popular cafes
in practically every district of London.
In many of these cafes there is self-service—
there are no waiters or waitresses.
Many employees do not bother to go out to lunch.
They bring their own sandwiches,
and perhaps an apple or bread,
with which they have a cup of tea,
probably made in the office.
This method has the advantages of being cheap
and saving time in getting to a restaurant
and queuing up there.
In summer, many people go out
and sit on a bench in a park or public square,
and eat their sandwiches there.
They are often able to
listen to lunch-time concerts and plays, too.
Questions 26 to 28 are based on the passage
you have just heard.
26. Why don't most Londoners go home for lunch?
27. Which is true according to the passage?
28. Which is the main idea of this passage?
Passage Two
Most people picture sharks as huge, powerful,
frightening animals that eat meat,
ready at any moment to use their sharp teeth
to attack careless swimmers without provocation.
There are numerous wrong opinions, however,
in this conception of sharks.
First of all, there are about 350 species of shark,
and not all of them are large.
They range in size from the dwarf shark,
which can be only 6 inches long
and can be held in the palm of the hand,
to the whale shark, which can be
more than 55 feet long.
A second wrong opinion concerns the number
and type of teeth, which can vary tremendously
among different species of shark.
A shark can have from one to seven sets of teeth
at the same time,
and some types of shark can
have several hundred teeth in each jaw.
It is true that the fierce and predatory species
do possess extremely sharp
and brutal teeth used to rip prey apart;
many other types of shark, however,
have teeth more adapted to grabbing
and holding than to cutting and slashing.
Finally, not all sharks are frightening animals
ready to strike out at humans.
In fact, only 12 of the 350 species of shark
have been known to attack humans,
and a shark needs to be provoked in order to attack.
The types of shark that have the worst record
with humans are the tiger shark,
the bull shark and the great white shark.
However, for most species of shark,
even some of the largest types,
there are no known instances of attacks on humans.
Questions 29 to 31 are based on the passage
you have just heard.
29. What is the main purpose of the passage?
30. Which is probably the longest shark?
31. Which is true according to the passage?
Passage Three
Today the government announced a shortlist
of 15 locations for so-called eco-towns.
That is new towns built according to environmental principles.
It sounds fine.
But what would it actually be like to live in one?
In Freiberg in southern Germany,
some districts are run on strictly eco-town principles.
Vauban, a suburb of Freiberg,
is a close-knit community with super-efficient homes,
grassy rooftops,
solar panels and a multitude of recycling bins,
calm streets with trams and bicycles.
In one of its eco-houses,
it only takes the energy of a light bulb to keep warm.
The single radiator has never been used.
Thick insulation retains heat generated
by the bodies of the family,
even the guinea pig contributes.
Actually, it is a self-selecting community of
educated middle class people.
Eco-houses are expensive and
it takes ten years before the energy savings start to pay off.
So it's the eloquent toller
or social control with rules and discipline
that keep the community in order
with stiff fines for those who disobey.
In some parts of the neighborhood,
residents even have to sign a contract
that they don't use up a car regularly and don't own a car.
They are used to the car-sharing.
For those who skirt the rules, beware,
the Auto-free Verein, the car-free society is watching.
Questions 32 to 35 are based on the passage
you have just heard.
32. What is an eco-town according to the passage?
33. Which word can best describe Vauban?
34. According to the passage,
what kind of residents do eco-towns welcome?
35. What if people in eco-towns disobey the eco-rules?
Section C
Directions: In this section,
you will hear a passage three times.
When the passage is read for the first time,
you should listen carefully for its general idea.
When the passage is read for the second time,
you are required to fill in the blanks numbered from 36 to 43
with the exact words you have just heard.
For blanks numbered from 44 to 46
you are required to fill in the missing information.
For these blanks,
you can either use the exact words you have just heard
or write down the main points in your own words.
Finally, when the passage is read for the third time,
you should check what you have written.
Now listen to the passage.
As a child must be able to move his arms and legs
before he can learn to walk,
The child must be capable of producing
and experiencing particular emotions
before these emotions can be modified through learning.
Psychologists have found that there are two basic processes
by which learning takes place.
One kind of learning is called "classical conditioning".
This occurred when one event or stimulus
is consistently paired with,
or followed by, a reward or punishment.
It is through classical conditioning
that a child learns to associate his mother's face
and voice with happiness and love,
for he learns that this person provides food and comfort.
The second kind of learning is called "operant conditioning".
This occurs when an individual learns
to do things produce rewards in his environment
and learns not to do things that produce punishments.
For example, if a mother always attends to her baby
when he cries and cuddles him until he is quiet,
she may teach him that if he cries he will get attention from mother.
Thus, the baby will learn to increase his crying
in order to have his mother more.
Why is it that we learn to like some people
and dislike others?
If a person is nice to us,
we learn to associate this person with positive feelings,
such as joy, happiness, and friendliness.
On the other hand, if a person is mean to us,
and even deliberately does things to harm us,
we learn to associate this person with negative feelings,
such as unhappiness, discomfort, and anger.
Now the passage will be read again.
As a child must be able to move his arms
and legs before he can learn to walk,
The child must be capable of producing
and experiencing particular emotions
before these emotions can be modified through learning.
Psychologists have found that there are two basic processes
by which learning takes place.
One kind of learning is called "classical conditioning".
This occurred when one event or
stimulus is consistently paired with,
or followed by, a reward or punishment.
It is through classical conditioning
that a child learns to associate his mother's face
and voice with happiness and love,
for he learns that this person provides food and comfort.
The second kind of learning is called "operant conditioning".
This occurs when an individual learns
to do things produce rewards in his environment
and learns not to do things that produce punishments.
For example, if a mother always attends to her baby
when he cries and cuddles him until he is quiet,
she may teach him that if he cries
he will get attention from mother.
Thus, the baby will learn to increase his crying
in order to have his mother more.
Why is it that we learn to like some people
and dislike others?
If a person is nice to us,
we learn to associate this person with positive feelings,
such as joy, happiness, and friendliness.
On the other hand, if a person is mean to us,
and even deliberately does things to harm us,
we learn to associate this person with negative feelings,
such as unhappiness, discomfort, and anger.
Now the passage will be read for the third time.
As a child must be able to move his arms
and legs before he can learn to walk,
The child must be capable of producing
and experiencing particular emotions
before these emotions can be modified through learning.
Psychologists have found that there are two basic processes
by which learning takes place.
One kind of learning is called "classical conditioning".
This occurred when one event or stimulus
is consistently paired with,
or followed by, a reward or punishment.
It is through classical conditioning
that a child learns to associate his mother's face
and voice with happiness and love,
for he learns that this person provides food and comfort.
The second kind of learning is called "operant conditioning".
This occurs when an individual learns
to do things produce rewards in his environment
and learns not to do things that produce punishments.
For example, if a mother always attends to her baby
when he cries and cuddles him until he is quiet,
she may teach him that if he cries
he will get attention from mother.
Thus, the baby will learn to increase his crying
in order to have his mother more.
Why is it that we learn to like some people
and dislike others?
If a person is nice to us,
we learn to associate this person with positive feelings,
such as joy, happiness, and friendliness.
On the other hand, if a person is mean to us,
and even deliberately does things to harm us,
we learn to associate this person with negative feelings,
such as unhappiness, discomfort, and anger.
This is the end of listening comprehension.

MODEL TEST 15 Section A Directions: In this section, you will hear 8 short conversations and 2 long conversations. At the end of each conversation, one or more questions will be asked about what was said. Both the conversation and the questions will be spoken only once. After each question there will be a pause. During the pause, you must read the four choices marked A), B), C) and D), and decide which is the best answer. Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2 with a single line through the centre. Now, let's begin with the eight short conversations. 11.M: Do you know that Mark turned down the job that offered by a travel agency? W: Yeah. The hours were convenient, but he wouldn't have been able to make ends meet. Q: Why did Mark refuse to take the job? 12. M: Can we eat somewhere else? Very few small restaurants like this serve good food. W: I know, but there isn't anywhere else in this town. Look, the waiter is coming over for our order. Q: What do they think about the restaurant? 13. M: John must have been joking when he said that he was going to live in Boston. W: Don't be so sure. He told me that he was looking for an agent to sell his house. Q: What does the woman think of John? 14. W: How are you able to go out this weekend? I thought you were supposed to be working. M: I was able to swing a deal with my coworker by promising to work the next two weekends in exchange. Q: What do we learn from the conversation? 15. W: My chemistry project is in trouble because my partner and I have totally different ideas about how to proceed. M: You should try to meet each other half way. Q: What does the man suggest the woman do? 16. W: Hi, Mike. What's this music you're listening to? I feel like I just walked into a Starbucks. M: Please don't insult me like that -this is a far cry from the kind of music they play at your average coffee shop. Actually, I'm listening to my favorite jazz CD, by the saxophone player Sonny Rollins. Q: What does the man mean? 17. M: It seems to me that I've seen the dark-haired man somewhere before. W: Sure you have. He checked us at the book circulation desk just yesterday. Q: Where does the dark-haired man most probably work? 18. W: What do you think? Are you OK? M: Well, there is some information that seems to me... I want to have a thorough checkup and do some tests. Q: What's the probable relationship between the two speakers? Now you will hear the two long conversations. Conversation One W: Hi, How can I help you? M: Yes, I'd like to return this sweater for a refund. I bought it a week ago. W: Well, first of all, what seems to be the problem? M: Well, isn't it obvious by just looking at it? The first time I washed and dried it, the thing shrank at least five sizes. It wouldn't even fit a thin snake. W: Uh, I see what you mean, but did you follow the washing instructions? I think it says here... yeah... right here on the label to hand wash it and then dry it on low heat. M: How was I supposed to know that? The label is written in Chinese! And something else: the stitching is coming undone and the color faded from a nice dark blue to a sea-weed green. What kind of merchandise are you trying to sell here anyway? W: Listen, sir. We take a lot of pride in our clothing. What I can do is allow you to exchange the sweater for another one. M: I don't want to exchange it for anything! I just want my money back! W: Well, I can give you credit on your next purchase. Since the item you purchased was on clearance, we can't give you a refund. M: A clearance item! No wonder! Well, I want to talk to the manager. W: Uh, he's not here at the moment. M: Look, This is ridiculous. W: And anyway, you can only return items with a receipt within six days, and unfortunately, that was yesterday in your case. M: Okay, I'll choose another one. Questions 19 to 21 are based on the conversation you've just heard. 19. Why did the man want to return the sweater? 20. How did the woman deal with the man's request? 21. What do we learn at the end of the conversation? Conversation Two W: Good morning. Can I help you? M: Yes, please. I'm a new student and I'd like to have some information about the accommodation. W: Right. The university provides two types of accommodation, halls of residence and self-catering accommodation. M: How much does it cost for the self-catering accommodation? W: For a single room, thirty-seven pounds eighty-six per week, that's about five forty-one a day. For a double room, it's fifty-two per week. M: I’d like the self-catering accommodation. How far is that from the residence to the university? W: It all depends. The residence at 110 Palm Street is about one and a half miles and the Freemen's Common Houses at William Road are about half a mile. M: When do I need to apply? W: Are you an undergraduate or a postgraduate? M: Undergraduate. W: Then you should apply for it as soon as possible, since places in university-owned accommodation are limited and if you don't apply before the end of the month, you are not likely to get a place. M: Could you possibly tell me what to do, if no vacancy is available? W: Yes, you may consider private accommodation. The university runs an Accommodation Information Office and its staff will help you. M: Where's the office? W: In the Students’ Union Building. M: Whom can I contact? W: Mr. Underwood. David Underwood, the manager of the Accommodation Information Office. M: Thanks a lot. W: My pleasure. Questions 22 to 25 are based on the conversation you’ve just heard. 22. What does the conversation mainly tell us? 23. How much does a single room cost per day for the self-catering accommodation? 24. When does a student need to apply if he or she wants a university-owned accommodation? 25. What can be inferred from the conversation? Section B Directions: In this section, you will hear 3 short passages. At the end of each passage, you will hear some questions. Both the passage and the questions will be spoken only once. After you hear a question, you must choose the best answer from the four choices marked A), B), C) and D). Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2 with a single line through the centre. Passage One Most people who work in London get a break of about an hour for lunch. As they most live too far from home to go back for lunch, they have to make other arrangements for their midday meal. Many large companies have a canteen designed for their employees. In such canteens the food served is simple but adequate and although there are a variety of choices, the number of dishes is small. The employees themselves fetch their dishes from a counter at which they are served. As there are so many people at work in London, there are numerous cafes and restaurants in every area that is not purely residential. A meal may cost anything from a modest sum to quite a few pounds, depending on the restaurant and the food chosen. Moreover, one can generally get a meal, or at least a snack, in a pub. A number of well-known caterers run popular cafes in practically every district of London. In many of these cafes there is self-service— there are no waiters or waitresses. Many employees do not bother to go out to lunch. They bring their own sandwiches, and perhaps an apple or bread, with which they have a cup of tea, probably made in the office. This method has the advantages of being cheap and saving time in getting to a restaurant and queuing up there. In summer, many people go out and sit on a bench in a park or public square, and eat their sandwiches there. They are often able to listen to lunch-time concerts and plays, too. Questions 26 to 28 are based on the passage you have just heard. 26. Why don't most Londoners go home for lunch? 27. Which is true according to the passage? 28. Which is the main idea of this passage? Passage Two Most people picture sharks as huge, powerful, frightening animals that eat meat, ready at any moment to use their sharp teeth to attack careless swimmers without provocation. There are numerous wrong opinions, however, in this conception of sharks. First of all, there are about 350 species of shark, and not all of them are large. They range in size from the dwarf shark, which can be only 6 inches long and can be held in the palm of the hand, to the whale shark, which can be more than 55 feet long. A second wrong opinion concerns the number and type of teeth, which can vary tremendously among different species of shark. A shark can have from one to seven sets of teeth at the same time, and some types of shark can have several hundred teeth in each jaw. It is true that the fierce and predatory species do possess extremely sharp and brutal teeth used to rip prey apart; many other types of shark, however, have teeth more adapted to grabbing and holding than to cutting and slashing. Finally, not all sharks are frightening animals ready to strike out at humans. In fact, only 12 of the 350 species of shark have been known to attack humans, and a shark needs to be provoked in order to attack. The types of shark that have the worst record with humans are the tiger shark, the bull shark and the great white shark. However, for most species of shark, even some of the largest types, there are no known instances of attacks on humans. Questions 29 to 31 are based on the passage you have just heard. 29. What is the main purpose of the passage? 30. Which is probably the longest shark? 31. Which is true according to the passage? Passage Three Today the government announced a shortlist of 15 locations for so-called eco-towns. That is new towns built according to environmental principles. It sounds fine. But what would it actually be like to live in one? In Freiberg in southern Germany, some districts are run on strictly eco-town principles. Vauban, a suburb of Freiberg, is a close-knit community with super-efficient homes, grassy rooftops, solar panels and a multitude of recycling bins, calm streets with trams and bicycles. In one of its eco-houses, it only takes the energy of a light bulb to keep warm. The single radiator has never been used. Thick insulation retains heat generated by the bodies of the family, even the guinea pig contributes. Actually, it is a self-selecting community of educated middle class people. Eco-houses are expensive and it takes ten years before the energy savings start to pay off. So it's the eloquent toller or social control with rules and discipline that keep the community in order with stiff fines for those who disobey. In some parts of the neighborhood, residents even have to sign a contract that they don't use up a car regularly and don't own a car. They are used to the car-sharing. For those who skirt the rules, beware, the Auto-free Verein, the car-free society is watching. Questions 32 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard. 32. What is an eco-town according to the passage? 33. Which word can best describe Vauban? 34. According to the passage, what kind of residents do eco-towns welcome? 35. What if people in eco-towns disobey the eco-rules? Section C Directions: In this section, you will hear a passage three times. When the passage is read for the first time, you should listen carefully for its general idea. When the passage is read for the second time, you are required to fill in the blanks numbered from 36 to 43 with the exact words you have just heard. For blanks numbered from 44 to 46 you are required to fill in the missing information. For these blanks, you can either use the exact words you have just heard or write down the main points in your own words. Finally, when the passage is read for the third time, you should check what you have written. Now listen to the passage. As a child must be able to move his arms and legs before he can learn to walk, The child must be capable of producing and experiencing particular emotions before these emotions can be modified through learning. Psychologists have found that there are two basic processes by which learning takes place. One kind of learning is called "classical conditioning". This occurred when one event or stimulus is consistently paired with, or followed by, a reward or punishment. It is through classical conditioning that a child learns to associate his mother's face and voice with happiness and love, for he learns that this person provides food and comfort. The second kind of learning is called "operant conditioning". This occurs when an individual learns to do things produce rewards in his environment and learns not to do things that produce punishments. For example, if a mother always attends to her baby when he cries and cuddles him until he is quiet, she may teach him that if he cries he will get attention from mother. Thus, the baby will learn to increase his crying in order to have his mother more. Why is it that we learn to like some people and dislike others? If a person is nice to us, we learn to associate this person with positive feelings, such as joy, happiness, and friendliness. On the other hand, if a person is mean to us, and even deliberately does things to harm us, we learn to associate this person with negative feelings, such as unhappiness, discomfort, and anger. Now the passage will be read again. As a child must be able to move his arms and legs before he can learn to walk, The child must be capable of producing and experiencing particular emotions before these emotions can be modified through learning. Psychologists have found that there are two basic processes by which learning takes place. One kind of learning is called "classical conditioning". This occurred when one event or stimulus is consistently paired with, or followed by, a reward or punishment. It is through classical conditioning that a child learns to associate his mother's face and voice with happiness and love, for he learns that this person provides food and comfort. The second kind of learning is called "operant conditioning". This occurs when an individual learns to do things produce rewards in his environment and learns not to do things that produce punishments. For example, if a mother always attends to her baby when he cries and cuddles him until he is quiet, she may teach him that if he cries he will get attention from mother. Thus, the baby will learn to increase his crying in order to have his mother more. Why is it that we learn to like some people and dislike others? If a person is nice to us, we learn to associate this person with positive feelings, such as joy, happiness, and friendliness. On the other hand, if a person is mean to us, and even deliberately does things to harm us, we learn to associate this person with negative feelings, such as unhappiness, discomfort, and anger. Now the passage will be read for the third time. As a child must be able to move his arms and legs before he can learn to walk, The child must be capable of producing and experiencing particular emotions before these emotions can be modified through learning. Psychologists have found that there are two basic processes by which learning takes place. One kind of learning is called "classical conditioning". This occurred when one event or stimulus is consistently paired with, or followed by, a reward or punishment. It is through classical conditioning that a child learns to associate his mother's face and voice with happiness and love, for he learns that this person provides food and comfort. The second kind of learning is called "operant conditioning". This occurs when an individual learns to do things produce rewards in his environment and learns not to do things that produce punishments. For example, if a mother always attends to her baby when he cries and cuddles him until he is quiet, she may teach him that if he cries he will get attention from mother. Thus, the baby will learn to increase his crying in order to have his mother more. Why is it that we learn to like some people and dislike others? If a person is nice to us, we learn to associate this person with positive feelings, such as joy, happiness, and friendliness. On the other hand, if a person is mean to us, and even deliberately does things to harm us, we learn to associate this person with negative feelings, such as unhappiness, discomfort, and anger. This is the end of listening comprehension.
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