MODEL TEST 07 星火英语英语6级听力直通249分+MP3(含字幕)

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MODEL TEST 7
Section A
Directions:
In this section,
you will hear 8 short conversations
and 2 long conversations.
At the end of each conversation,
one or more questions will be
asked about what was said.
Both the conversation
and the questions
will be spoken only once.
After each question
there will be a pause.
During the pause,
you must read the four choices
marked A), B), C) and D),
and decide which is the best answer.
Then mark the corresponding letter
on Answer Sheet 2
with a single line
through the center.
Now let's begin with
the 8 short conversations.
11.W: Did you go shopping this afternoon?
M: Yes, but all I got was a sore foot.
Q: What does the man mean?
12.M: If we turn down his offer,
we may not get another partner.
W: That's exactly what I have in mind.
Yet, even so,
we can't afford to
do business with somebody unreliable.
Q: What can we learn from the conversation?
13.M: Excuse me,
I'd like to request an early morning call
at 6 sharp.
Hmmm, by phone, please,
I don't want to disturb my neighbors.
W: Ok, 6 o'clock.
Which room are you in, sir?
Q: Where does the conversation take place?
14. M: Hey, Louise,
I've got a used copy of our
chemistry textbook for half price.
W: I'm afraid you wasted your money,
yours is the first edition,
but we're supposed to be
using the third edition.
Q: What has the man done?
15. M: Now, what's your problem, Madam?
W: Oh, yes. My husband bought
this yellow skirt here yesterday.
It is very nice,
but it's not the color I want.
Have you got any blue ones?
Q: What does the woman want to do?
16.W: The place I've heard
so much about is Los Angeles.
The climate is pretty good.
Year-round flowers,
year-round swimming.
How do you like it?
M: Well, the beaches are beautiful.
But the people there are
terribly annoyed by the dirty air.
I mean, the combination of fog,
smoke and automobile exhaust.
There is not enough wind
to blow it away.
Q: What does the man
think of Los Angeles?
17.M: I hear you are
moving to an apartment.
Can you tell me why?
W: Actually, I didn’t want to move.
It would be more expensive to
live outside the college.
But I just can’t bear the noise
made by the people living next door.
Q: Why does the woman want to move?
18. W: I wonder if you have time to
go to the food store today.
We have almost run out of bread.
M: You’d better do that.
I haven’t got my report ready yet,
but my boss needs it tomorrow.
Q: Why isn’t the man
going to do the shopping?
Now you will hear the
two long conversations.
Conversation One
W: Hello, Jim.
M: Hi, Judy. The instructor
really liked my sketches,
but she hasn’t seen my painting yet.
W: En , there seems to be
something wrong with it though.
M: Yeah, I know what you mean.
It doesn’t look right to me either.
W: I think I know.
Look here at the sky,
it just seems to fit in
with other colors of the painting.
M: What do you mean?
Everyone know the sky is blue.
W: Well, that’s depends.
Sometimes it is
and sometimes it isn’t,
as sunset can be full
of reds and purples.
Well, even now, look at it now,
Jim, what do you see?
M: It looks blue to me.
W: Look again.
Do you see a kind of
yellowish-brown color?
M: Oh yeah,
I see what you mean.
W: By adding some tan
to your sky,
I think you’ll
get more actual picture,
and the color will
look more natural.
M: I think I’ll try that.
How do you get to
know so much about painting?
Have you taken a lot of courses?
W: No, actually.
But my father is an artist.
M: A professional artist?
W: Oh yeah. When we were kids,
he always talked to us
about his work.
M: I wish we could talk some more.
How about going for a cup of coffee?
I’m ready for a break.
W: I’d love to,
but I have to study
for a history exam.
In fact, I was just on my way
to the study group,
and I think I am already late.
Maybe tomorrow?
M: Great,
I’ll meet you at the students’ center
after my class.
A little after three, OK?
W: Sounds good.
Get around now.
M: Bye, Judy.
Questions 19 to 21 are based on
the conversation you have just heard.
19. What are the speakers
mainly discussing?
20. What does the woman
suggest the man do?
21. What does the woman
plan to do next?
Conversation Two
W: I understand you are taking
the American literature
seminar this semester, Jim.
How do you like it?
M: I find it very interesting.
Our first reading assignment
was the book Travels
with Charley by John Steinbeck.
W: I’ve heard that
it includes descriptions of
many different parts
of the United States.
M: Yes, that’s quite true.
Steinbeck and his pet poodle,
Charley, had lots of adventures.
They got caught in a hurricane
in New York. In Maine,
they met migrant farm workers
and in California they visited
some of Steinbeck’s old friends.
W: Well, that's
certainly a lively guide
for travelers.
Do you think the book is
an artistic masterpiece as well?
M: That's a good question.
I’ve been giving it
some serious thought
because I’m writing my seminar paper
on that exact topic.
I guess that
Steinbeck is a talented writer,
but not a great one.
W: What would you say is
his strongest point as a writer?
M: Steinbeck’s description of
the various states is
the best part of the book,
I think. Although
I haven’t been there yet,
I feel that I know
not only the terrain of
Texas and Idaho,
but also the character
of the people who live there.
W: Yes, I’ve often learned
that Steinbeck can communicate
a sense of place very clearly.
Does the book have any central theme
to hold all these description together?
M: That’s what
I am trying to explain in my paper.
I think Steinbeck’s theme
is the urge to travel.
He captures the curiosity,
the desire for experiences
and the need to expand one’s horizons
that motivate all of us
towards intellectual growth.
Questions 22 to 25 are based on
the conversation you have just heard.
22. What was Jim’s first reading assignment
for his American literature seminar?
23. What does Jim think
about Steinbeck as a writer?
24. What does Jim admire most
in Steinbeck’s book?
25. According to Jim,
What is Steinbeck’s central theme?
Section B
Directions:
In this section,
you will hear 3 short passages.
At the end of each passage,
you will hear some questions.
Both the passage
and the questions will be
spoken only once.
After you hear a question,
you must choose the best answer
from the four choices
marked A), B), C) and D).
Then mark the corresponding letter
on Answer Sheet 2 with a single line
through the center.
Passage One
Strikes are very common in Britain.
They are extremely
harmful to its industries.
In fact, there are other countries
in Western Europe that lose
more working days through strikes every year
than Britain.
The trouble with the strikes in Britain
is that they occur in essential industries.
There are over 495 unions in Britain.
Some unions are very small.
Over 20 have more than 100 000 members.
Unions do not exist
only to demand higher wages.
They also educate their members.
They provide benefits for the sick
and try to improve working conditions.
Trade unioners say
that we must thank the unions
for the great improvement
in working conditions
in the last hundred years.
It is now against the law
for union members to go on strike
without the support of their union.
This kind of strike is
called the unofficial strike
and was common until recently.
Employers feel that unofficial strikes
were most harmful
because they would not be predicted.
However, these unofficial strikes still
occur from time to time
and some unions have
also refused to
cooperate with the law.
As a result, the general picture
of the relations between workers
and employers in Britain
has gone from bad to worse.
Questions 26 to 28 are based on
the passage you have just heard.
26. In what way are strikes
in Britain different from those
in other European countries?
27. Why are British employers
so afraid of unofficial strikes?
28. What conclusion can be drawn
from this passage?
Passage Two
Deep Springs is an American college.
It is an unusual college.
It is high in the white mountains
in California not in a college town.
The campus is a collection
of old buildings
with no beautiful classrooms.
The only college-like thing
about Deep Springs is its library.
Students can study from
the 17 000 books 24 hours a day.
The library is never crowded
as there are only 24 well-qualified
male students at the college.
In addition, there are only
five full-time professors.
These teachers believe in the idea
of this college.
They need to believe in it.
They do not get much money.
In fact, their salaries are
only about 9 000 dollars
a year plus room
and meals.
The school gives the young teachers
as well as the students something more
important than money.
"There is no place like Deep Springs,"
says a second-year student
from New York State,
"Most colleges today
are much the same
but Deep Springs is not
afraid to be different.
" He says that students
at his college are in a situation
quite unlike the other schools.
Students are there to learn
and they cannot run away
from problems.
There is no place to escape to.
At most colleges,
students can close their books
and go to a film.
They can go out to restaurants
or to parties.
Deep Springs students have completely
different alternatives.
They can talk to each other
or to their teachers.
Another possible activity is
to go to the library to study.
They might decide to do some work.
The student who doesn' t want to do
any of these activities
can go for a walk in the desert.
Deep Springs is far from the
world of restaurants and cinemas.
There is not even
a television set on campus.
Questions 29 to 32 are based on
the passage you have just heard.
29. What is true of the campus
of Deep Springs College?
30. What is the total number
of students at Deep Springs College?
31. Which of the following
is mentioned in the passage?
32. What can students
at Deep Springs do
in their spare time?
Passage Three
Although unemployment is very serious,
it would be much worse
if we were not taking the combined action
that we as a government
and the bank of England have been taking.
The fact remains that 2 000 people
have lost their jobs everyday during the last year
while youth unemployment is down to 938 000.
People between the ages of 16 and 24 now
account for full 38 percent of those unemployed
and that's going to have fierce reactions
across the whole society
as the order commission warned earlier this week.
The other thing worth noting about these jobless figures
is that the disparity between the claimant count
by those people who are signing on for Jobseekers' Allowance
and the ILO Measure which is a broadened measure
of those people who without work
but not necessarily claiming benefits is continuing.
Now the government is looking at this already,
and there are some suggestions that one may be the case.
One theory is that people who've lost their jobs
simply depending on their partners
rather than signing on forbenefits themselves.
Now there're a couple of raise of hope.
First of all,
we've had earnings figures out today.
Earnings figures in the 3 months to June
were up to 2.5% and
that's improvement on the previous situation,
potentially that's good news for consumer spending.
However it should be borne out
that's within the private sector
which is counting for 80%
of the workforce earning's running rising by some 2.1%.
The majority of that increase is in the public sector,
which again doesn't bode well
for the government's attempts to ease back on public spending.
Questions 33 to 35 are based on the passage
you have just heard.
33. What does the passage mainly talk about?
34. What is ILO Measure according to the passage?
35. What does the passage say about earnings figures?
Section C
Directions: In this section,
you will hear a passage
three times.
When the passage is read
for the first time,
you should listen carefully
for its general idea.
When the passage is read
for the second time,
you are required to fill
in the blanks numbered
from 36 to 43
with the exact words
you have just heard.
For blanks numbered
from 44 to 46
you are required to fill
in the missing information.
For these blanks,
you can either use the exact words
you have just heard
or write down the main points
in your own words.
Finally, when the passage
is read for the third time,
you should check
what you have written.
Now listen to the passage.
In Britain, the idea
of the Welfare State
could be said to have begun with
the Poor Relief Act in 1601.
This acknowledged that society
as a whole had a responsibility
towards its weaker members, people
who suffered as a result of
circumstances that they could not control,
such as illness
or inability to work.
Before that, religious orders
were the only organizations
to look after people
who had no one to care for them.
The poor Relief Act was
revised in the nineteenth century.
In the years before
the 1914—1918 war
the Liberal Prime Minister,
Lloyed George, introduced a pension
for people over seventy
and some from of compensation
for the people injured
while working in industry.
The basis of
today’s Welfare States
in Brian was laid in 1942
by a former director
of the London School of Economics,
Sir William Beveridge.
He proposed a radical scheme
for the abolition of poverty
through a system of social insurance.
But his proposal didn’t stop there.
He said that, in order to
reconstruct British society
on a more just
and democratic basis,
other evils had to be tackled.
There were, he said,
disease, ignorance, squalor and idleness.
After considerable political struggle
an Education Act was passed in 1944.
It abolished school fees.
It raised the school leaving age
from fourteen to fifteen
and provided for further education
until the age of eighteen.
In 1948 the establishment
of the National Health Service
gave every Briton the right to
free medical, dental and eye treatment.
Now the passage will be read again.
In Brian the idea
of the Welfare State
could be said to have begun with
the Poor Relief Act in 1601.
This acknowledged that society
as a whole had a responsibility
towards its weaker members, people
who suffered as a result of
circumstances that
they could not control,
such as illness
or inability to work.
Before that, religious orders
were the only organizations
to look after people
who had no one to care for them.
The poor Relief Act was
revised in the nineteenth century.
In the years before
the 1914-1918 war
the Liberal Prime Minister,
Lloyed George, introduced a pension
for people over seventy
and some from of compensation
for the people injured
while working in industry.
The basis of
today's Welfare States
in Britain was laid in 1942
by a former director
of the London School of Economics,
Sir William Beveridge.
He proposed a radical scheme
for the abolition of poverty
through a system of social insurance.
But his proposal didn't stop there.
He said that, in order to
reconstruct British society
on a more just
and democratic basis,
other evils had to be tackled.
There were, he said,
disease, ignorance, squalor and idleness.
After considerable political struggle
an Education Act was passed in 1944.
It abolished school fees.
It raised the school leaving age
from fourteen to fifteen
and provided for further education
until the age of eighteen.
In 1948 the establishment
of the National Health Service
gave every Briton the right to
free medical, dental and eye treatment.
Now the passage will be
read for the third time.
In Britain the idea
of the Welfare State
could be said to have begun with
the Poor Relief Act in 1601.
This acknowledged that society
as a whole had a responsibility
towards its weaker members, people
who suffered as a result of
circumstances that
they could not control,
such as illness
or inability to work.
Before that, religious orders
were the only organizations
to look after people
who had no one to care for them.
The Poor Relief Act was
revised in the nineteenth century.
In the years before
the 1914-1918 war
the Liberal Prime Minister,
Lloyed George, introduced a pension
for people over seventy
and some from of compensation
for the people injured
while working in industry.
The basis of
today’s Welfare States
in Britain was laid in 1942
by a former director
of the London School of Economics,
Sir William Beveridge.
He proposed a radical scheme
for the abolition of poverty
through a system of social insurance.
But his proposal didn’t stop there.
He said that, in order to
reconstruct British society
on a more just
and democratic basis,
other evils had to be tackled.
There were, he said,
disease, ignorance, squalor and idleness.
After considerable political struggle
an Education Act was passed in 1944.
It abolished school fees.
It raised the school leaving age
from fourteen to fifteen
and provided for further education
until the age of eighteen.
In 1948 the establishment
of the National Health Service
gave every Briton the right to
free medical, dental and eye treatment.
This is the end of listening comprehension.

MODEL TEST 7 Section A Directions: In this section, you will hear 8 short conversations and 2 long conversations. At the end of each conversation, one or more questions will be asked about what was said. Both the conversation and the questions will be spoken only once. After each question there will be a pause. During the pause, you must read the four choices marked A), B), C) and D), and decide which is the best answer. Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2 with a single line through the center. Now let's begin with the 8 short conversations. 11.W: Did you go shopping this afternoon? M: Yes, but all I got was a sore foot. Q: What does the man mean? 12.M: If we turn down his offer, we may not get another partner. W: That's exactly what I have in mind. Yet, even so, we can't afford to do business with somebody unreliable. Q: What can we learn from the conversation? 13.M: Excuse me, I'd like to request an early morning call at 6 sharp. Hmmm, by phone, please, I don't want to disturb my neighbors. W: Ok, 6 o'clock. Which room are you in, sir? Q: Where does the conversation take place? 14. M: Hey, Louise, I've got a used copy of our chemistry textbook for half price. W: I'm afraid you wasted your money, yours is the first edition, but we're supposed to be using the third edition. Q: What has the man done? 15. M: Now, what's your problem, Madam? W: Oh, yes. My husband bought this yellow skirt here yesterday. It is very nice, but it's not the color I want. Have you got any blue ones? Q: What does the woman want to do? 16.W: The place I've heard so much about is Los Angeles. The climate is pretty good. Year-round flowers, year-round swimming. How do you like it? M: Well, the beaches are beautiful. But the people there are terribly annoyed by the dirty air. I mean, the combination of fog, smoke and automobile exhaust. There is not enough wind to blow it away. Q: What does the man think of Los Angeles? 17.M: I hear you are moving to an apartment. Can you tell me why? W: Actually, I didn’t want to move. It would be more expensive to live outside the college. But I just can’t bear the noise made by the people living next door. Q: Why does the woman want to move? 18. W: I wonder if you have time to go to the food store today. We have almost run out of bread. M: You’d better do that. I haven’t got my report ready yet, but my boss needs it tomorrow. Q: Why isn’t the man going to do the shopping? Now you will hear the two long conversations. Conversation One W: Hello, Jim. M: Hi, Judy. The instructor really liked my sketches, but she hasn’t seen my painting yet. W: En , there seems to be something wrong with it though. M: Yeah, I know what you mean. It doesn’t look right to me either. W: I think I know. Look here at the sky, it just seems to fit in with other colors of the painting. M: What do you mean? Everyone know the sky is blue. W: Well, that’s depends. Sometimes it is and sometimes it isn’t, as sunset can be full of reds and purples. Well, even now, look at it now, Jim, what do you see? M: It looks blue to me. W: Look again. Do you see a kind of yellowish-brown color? M: Oh yeah, I see what you mean. W: By adding some tan to your sky, I think you’ll get more actual picture, and the color will look more natural. M: I think I’ll try that. How do you get to know so much about painting? Have you taken a lot of courses? W: No, actually. But my father is an artist. M: A professional artist? W: Oh yeah. When we were kids, he always talked to us about his work. M: I wish we could talk some more. How about going for a cup of coffee? I’m ready for a break. W: I’d love to, but I have to study for a history exam. In fact, I was just on my way to the study group, and I think I am already late. Maybe tomorrow? M: Great, I’ll meet you at the students’ center after my class. A little after three, OK? W: Sounds good. Get around now. M: Bye, Judy. Questions 19 to 21 are based on the conversation you have just heard. 19. What are the speakers mainly discussing? 20. What does the woman suggest the man do? 21. What does the woman plan to do next? Conversation Two W: I understand you are taking the American literature seminar this semester, Jim. How do you like it? M: I find it very interesting. Our first reading assignment was the book Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck. W: I’ve heard that it includes descriptions of many different parts of the United States. M: Yes, that’s quite true. Steinbeck and his pet poodle, Charley, had lots of adventures. They got caught in a hurricane in New York. In Maine, they met migrant farm workers and in California they visited some of Steinbeck’s old friends. W: Well, that's certainly a lively guide for travelers. Do you think the book is an artistic masterpiece as well? M: That's a good question. I’ve been giving it some serious thought because I’m writing my seminar paper on that exact topic. I guess that Steinbeck is a talented writer, but not a great one. W: What would you say is his strongest point as a writer? M: Steinbeck’s description of the various states is the best part of the book, I think. Although I haven’t been there yet, I feel that I know not only the terrain of Texas and Idaho, but also the character of the people who live there. W: Yes, I’ve often learned that Steinbeck can communicate a sense of place very clearly. Does the book have any central theme to hold all these description together? M: That’s what I am trying to explain in my paper. I think Steinbeck’s theme is the urge to travel. He captures the curiosity, the desire for experiences and the need to expand one’s horizons that motivate all of us towards intellectual growth. Questions 22 to 25 are based on the conversation you have just heard. 22. What was Jim’s first reading assignment for his American literature seminar? 23. What does Jim think about Steinbeck as a writer? 24. What does Jim admire most in Steinbeck’s book? 25. According to Jim, What is Steinbeck’s central theme? Section B Directions: In this section, you will hear 3 short passages. At the end of each passage, you will hear some questions. Both the passage and the questions will be spoken only once. After you hear a question, you must choose the best answer from the four choices marked A), B), C) and D). Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2 with a single line through the center. Passage One Strikes are very common in Britain. They are extremely harmful to its industries. In fact, there are other countries in Western Europe that lose more working days through strikes every year than Britain. The trouble with the strikes in Britain is that they occur in essential industries. There are over 495 unions in Britain. Some unions are very small. Over 20 have more than 100 000 members. Unions do not exist only to demand higher wages. They also educate their members. They provide benefits for the sick and try to improve working conditions. Trade unioners say that we must thank the unions for the great improvement in working conditions in the last hundred years. It is now against the law for union members to go on strike without the support of their union. This kind of strike is called the unofficial strike and was common until recently. Employers feel that unofficial strikes were most harmful because they would not be predicted. However, these unofficial strikes still occur from time to time and some unions have also refused to cooperate with the law. As a result, the general picture of the relations between workers and employers in Britain has gone from bad to worse. Questions 26 to 28 are based on the passage you have just heard. 26. In what way are strikes in Britain different from those in other European countries? 27. Why are British employers so afraid of unofficial strikes? 28. What conclusion can be drawn from this passage? Passage Two Deep Springs is an American college. It is an unusual college. It is high in the white mountains in California not in a college town. The campus is a collection of old buildings with no beautiful classrooms. The only college-like thing about Deep Springs is its library. Students can study from the 17 000 books 24 hours a day. The library is never crowded as there are only 24 well-qualified male students at the college. In addition, there are only five full-time professors. These teachers believe in the idea of this college. They need to believe in it. They do not get much money. In fact, their salaries are only about 9 000 dollars a year plus room and meals. The school gives the young teachers as well as the students something more important than money. "There is no place like Deep Springs," says a second-year student from New York State, "Most colleges today are much the same but Deep Springs is not afraid to be different. " He says that students at his college are in a situation quite unlike the other schools. Students are there to learn and they cannot run away from problems. There is no place to escape to. At most colleges, students can close their books and go to a film. They can go out to restaurants or to parties. Deep Springs students have completely different alternatives. They can talk to each other or to their teachers. Another possible activity is to go to the library to study. They might decide to do some work. The student who doesn' t want to do any of these activities can go for a walk in the desert. Deep Springs is far from the world of restaurants and cinemas. There is not even a television set on campus. Questions 29 to 32 are based on the passage you have just heard. 29. What is true of the campus of Deep Springs College? 30. What is the total number of students at Deep Springs College? 31. Which of the following is mentioned in the passage? 32. What can students at Deep Springs do in their spare time? Passage Three Although unemployment is very serious, it would be much worse if we were not taking the combined action that we as a government and the bank of England have been taking. The fact remains that 2 000 people have lost their jobs everyday during the last year while youth unemployment is down to 938 000. People between the ages of 16 and 24 now account for full 38 percent of those unemployed and that's going to have fierce reactions across the whole society as the order commission warned earlier this week. The other thing worth noting about these jobless figures is that the disparity between the claimant count by those people who are signing on for Jobseekers' Allowance and the ILO Measure which is a broadened measure of those people who without work but not necessarily claiming benefits is continuing. Now the government is looking at this already, and there are some suggestions that one may be the case. One theory is that people who've lost their jobs simply depending on their partners rather than signing on forbenefits themselves. Now there're a couple of raise of hope. First of all, we've had earnings figures out today. Earnings figures in the 3 months to June were up to 2.5% and that's improvement on the previous situation, potentially that's good news for consumer spending. However it should be borne out that's within the private sector which is counting for 80% of the workforce earning's running rising by some 2.1%. The majority of that increase is in the public sector, which again doesn't bode well for the government's attempts to ease back on public spending. Questions 33 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard. 33. What does the passage mainly talk about? 34. What is ILO Measure according to the passage? 35. What does the passage say about earnings figures? Section C Directions: In this section, you will hear a passage three times. When the passage is read for the first time, you should listen carefully for its general idea. When the passage is read for the second time, you are required to fill in the blanks numbered from 36 to 43 with the exact words you have just heard. For blanks numbered from 44 to 46 you are required to fill in the missing information. For these blanks, you can either use the exact words you have just heard or write down the main points in your own words. Finally, when the passage is read for the third time, you should check what you have written. Now listen to the passage. In Britain, the idea of the Welfare State could be said to have begun with the Poor Relief Act in 1601. This acknowledged that society as a whole had a responsibility towards its weaker members, people who suffered as a result of circumstances that they could not control, such as illness or inability to work. Before that, religious orders were the only organizations to look after people who had no one to care for them. The poor Relief Act was revised in the nineteenth century. In the years before the 1914—1918 war the Liberal Prime Minister, Lloyed George, introduced a pension for people over seventy and some from of compensation for the people injured while working in industry. The basis of today’s Welfare States in Brian was laid in 1942 by a former director of the London School of Economics, Sir William Beveridge. He proposed a radical scheme for the abolition of poverty through a system of social insurance. But his proposal didn’t stop there. He said that, in order to reconstruct British society on a more just and democratic basis, other evils had to be tackled. There were, he said, disease, ignorance, squalor and idleness. After considerable political struggle an Education Act was passed in 1944. It abolished school fees. It raised the school leaving age from fourteen to fifteen and provided for further education until the age of eighteen. In 1948 the establishment of the National Health Service gave every Briton the right to free medical, dental and eye treatment. Now the passage will be read again. In Brian the idea of the Welfare State could be said to have begun with the Poor Relief Act in 1601. This acknowledged that society as a whole had a responsibility towards its weaker members, people who suffered as a result of circumstances that they could not control, such as illness or inability to work. Before that, religious orders were the only organizations to look after people who had no one to care for them. The poor Relief Act was revised in the nineteenth century. In the years before the 1914-1918 war the Liberal Prime Minister, Lloyed George, introduced a pension for people over seventy and some from of compensation for the people injured while working in industry. The basis of today's Welfare States in Britain was laid in 1942 by a former director of the London School of Economics, Sir William Beveridge. He proposed a radical scheme for the abolition of poverty through a system of social insurance. But his proposal didn't stop there. He said that, in order to reconstruct British society on a more just and democratic basis, other evils had to be tackled. There were, he said, disease, ignorance, squalor and idleness. After considerable political struggle an Education Act was passed in 1944. It abolished school fees. It raised the school leaving age from fourteen to fifteen and provided for further education until the age of eighteen. In 1948 the establishment of the National Health Service gave every Briton the right to free medical, dental and eye treatment. Now the passage will be read for the third time. In Britain the idea of the Welfare State could be said to have begun with the Poor Relief Act in 1601. This acknowledged that society as a whole had a responsibility towards its weaker members, people who suffered as a result of circumstances that they could not control, such as illness or inability to work. Before that, religious orders were the only organizations to look after people who had no one to care for them. The Poor Relief Act was revised in the nineteenth century. In the years before the 1914-1918 war the Liberal Prime Minister, Lloyed George, introduced a pension for people over seventy and some from of compensation for the people injured while working in industry. The basis of today’s Welfare States in Britain was laid in 1942 by a former director of the London School of Economics, Sir William Beveridge. He proposed a radical scheme for the abolition of poverty through a system of social insurance. But his proposal didn’t stop there. He said that, in order to reconstruct British society on a more just and democratic basis, other evils had to be tackled. There were, he said, disease, ignorance, squalor and idleness. After considerable political struggle an Education Act was passed in 1944. It abolished school fees. It raised the school leaving age from fourteen to fifteen and provided for further education until the age of eighteen. In 1948 the establishment of the National Health Service gave every Briton the right to free medical, dental and eye treatment. This is the end of listening comprehension.
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