四级考试巅峰训练一本通 Test 8

韩萱 2011-11-05 7612 阅读
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[00:01.26]Test Eight

[00:03.07]Section A

[00:04.78]1.W: Can you tell me back to the service station?

[00:08.68]I've run out of gas.

[00:09.98]M: That's not necessary.

[00:11.18]I have a spare can of gas with me.

[00:13.91]Q: What is the woman's problem?

[00:31.70]2. W: Well, maybe you are right.

[00:34.58]I should do more exercises in order to lose weight.

[00:37.38]M: Actually it depends on yourself.

[00:38.98]You must have a strong will.

[00:41.56]Q: What does the man suggest the woman do?

[00:60.00]3. W: Can you listen for my telephone?

[01:03.09]M: Sure. I'm planning to be here all day.

[01:05.97]Q: What does the woman want the man to do?

[01:24.52]4. M: I have an appointment to see Dr. Gram

[01:27.82]for a physical examination.

[01:29.42]W: Please have a seat. She's in surgery right now.

[01:33.02]Q: Where does the conversation most probably take place?

[01:52.16]5. M: Why are you laughing at me?

[01:54.99]W: Because you looked so funny in your new shorts.

[01:58.33]Q: What's the man wearing?

[02:15.83]6. M: Is your mother home?

[02:18.53]W: I'm afraid she's not here right now.

[02:20.28]You could call back later.

[02:22.32]Q: Where is the mother?

[02:39.77]7.M: Will you be here at 12:00?

[02:43.14]W: No,I'll be thirty minutes late.

[02:46.04]Q: When will the woman arrive?

[03:04.03]8. W: I certainly enjoyed my dinner! How was yours?

[03:08.11]M: Better than I expected

[03:09.36]since I'm not very fond of Italian food.

[03:11.49]For that price, it should have been good.

[03:14.06]Q: What conclusion can we draw from the man's answer?

[03:33.12]Conversation One

[03:35.02]W: Let's go into the penguin house.

[03:36.79]M: Great! I read that they've added

[03:38.55]a couple of emperor penguins from Antarctica.

[03:41.19]W: I was hoping to stay in the warmer section.

[03:43.54]You know, they have some penguins here

[03:45.14]from the Gal pagos Islands

[03:46.93]— and that's practically on the equator.

[03:49.02]M: But the emperor penguin's huge!

[03:50.81]It's a lot bigger than the Gal pagos penguin

[03:53.03]— in fact, it's bigger than all the other penguins

[03:55.05]— almost four feet high.

[03:56.58]W: Imagine a bird that size flying through the air …

[03:59.75]M: Penguins don't actually fly.

[04:01.54]W: I know that. They just sort of … waddle.

[04:04.35]M: They swim, too. Even though they're feathered,

[04:06.86]their wings are more like flippers

[04:08.61]— they work like paddles in the water.

[04:10.71]W: I thought they were land animals.

[04:12.56]M: They lay their eggs on land.

[04:13.95]They make their nests in these enormous colonies called rookeries.

[04:17.43]See, the emperor penguin has this interesting nesting habit.

[04:20.78]The female bird leaves the ocean at the beginning of autumn.

[04:23.75]She lays an egg on the ice

[04:25.02]and then immediately returns to the water.

[04:26.99]W: What happens to the egg?

[04:28.49]M: The male rolls it onto his feet

[04:30.12]and then covers it with the lower part of his belly.

[04:32.47]W: Then what?

[04:33.39]M: For two whole months,

[04:34.46]during the worst part of the winter,

[04:36.06]he huddles together with other male penguins

[04:37.89]to keep the eggs warm.

[04:39.64]W: So the female brings him food?

[04:41.54]M: No. See, the penguin can fast for up to four months.

[04:44.66]The female comes back after the chick hatches.

[04:47.00]When she does, the male goes out to sea

[04:49.54]to get food for himself and the chick.

[04:53.33]Questions 9 to 12 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

[04:57.62]9. Why does the man want to visit the penguin house?

[05:16.34]10. What is unique about the emperor penguin?

[05:34.55]11. What does the man say about the wings of the penguin?

[05:53.57]12. What does the male emperor penguin do

[05:57.00]after the female lays an egg?

[06:13.68]Conversation Two

[06:15.68]W: Could I see the Manager, please? I have a complaint.

[06:17.99]M: Can I help you, madam?

[06:19.25]W: Yes. Did you have this room checked before we moved in?

[06:22.33]There's not a scrap of lavatory paper

[06:24.58]and the toilet doesn't flush properly,

[06:26.79]the water doesn't run away in the shower

[06:28.81]and I would like an extra pillow.

[06:30.61]What have you to say to that?

[06:32.53]M: I'm extremely sorry to hear that.

[06:34.27]I'll attend to it right away.

[06:35.91]The housekeeper usually checks every room

[06:37.67]before new guests move in.

[06:39.48]We have been extremely busy with a large conference.

[06:42.12]W: That's no way to run a hotel.

[06:44.30]One doesn't expect this sort of thing in a well—run hotel.

[06:47.53]M: No, madam. I do apologize. It's most unusual.

[06:50.35]We do try to check the rooms as thoroughly as possible.

[06:53.14]Just the one pillow, was it?

[06:54.61]Is there anything else?

[06:55.96]W: Well, your thermostatically controlled air-conditioning

[06:58.40]doesn't seem to be working too well.

[07:00.56]It's as hot as hell up there.

[07:02.68]M: I'll just adjust the regulator for you

[07:04.69]and I think you'll find it a little cooler in a short time.

[07:07.78]I'll also send someone along right away

[07:09.71]to look at the toilet and shower.

[07:13.31]Questions 13 to 15 are based on the conversation you have just heard.

[07:17.93]13. What is the woman complaining about?

[07:36.33]14. Which of the following is not a problem mentioned by the woman?

[07:55.65]15. How many problems does the woman complain about?

[08:16.73]Section B

[08:18.45]Passage One

[08:19.96]Do you have trouble in sleeping at night?

[08:22.30]Then maybe this is for you.

[08:24.18]When you worry about needing sleep and twist around,

[08:26.84]trying to find a comfortable position,

[08:28.92]you're probably only making matters worse.

[08:31.85]What happens is that your heart rate actually increases,

[08:35.00]making it more difficult to relax.

[08:37.43]You may also have some bad habits that contribute to the problem.

[08:41.41]Do you rest frequently during the day?

[08:43.85]Do you get virtually no exercise,

[08:45.83]or do you exercise strenuously late in the day?

[08:48.99]Do you think about sleep a lot or sleep late on the weekend?

[08:53.30]Any or all of these factors might be leading to your insomnia

[08:56.82]by disrupting your body's natural rhythm.

[08:59.65]What should you do then on those sleepless nights?

[09:02.52]Don't bother with sleeping pills.

[09:04.56]They can actually cause worse insomnia later.

[09:07.67]The best thing to do is to drink milk, or eat cheese or tuna fish.

[09:11.78]They are all rich in amino acid that help produce

[09:14.27]a neurotransmitter in the brain that induces sleep.

[09:17.82]This neurotran smitter will help you relax

[09:20.16]and you'll be on the way to getting a good night's sleep.

[09:23.15]Until tomorrow's broadcast,

[09:24.74]it has been another in the series

[09:26.27]Hints for Good Health by Dr. Goodson.

[09:30.46]Questions 16 to 19 are based on the passage you have just heard.

[09:34.66]16. What happens when you turn

[09:37.10]and twist to get comfortable according to the passage?

[09:54.83]17. What sometimes causes people to have trouble sleeping

[09:58.96]according to the passage?

[10:15.35]18. What does the speaker say about sleeping pills?

[10:34.04]19. Where is the talk most probably being given?

[10:52.98]Passage Two

[10:54.65]There are many reasons why family life in Britain

[10:56.83]has changed so much in the last fifty years.

[10:59.39]The liberation of women in the early part of the twentieth century

[11:02.47]and the social and economic effects of World War Ⅱ

[11:05.51]had a great impact on traditional family life.

[11:08.11]Women became essential to industry and the professions.

[11:11.33]During the war they had worked in factories and proved their worth,

[11:14.83]now, with the loss of millions of men,

[11:16.86]their services were indispensable to the nation.

[11:19.51]More recently, great advances in scientific knowledge,

[11:21.80]and particularly in medicine,

[11:23.40]have had enormous social consequences.

[11:25.68]Children are better cared for and are far healthier.

[11:28.56]Infant death rate is low.

[11:30.21]Above all, parents can now plan the size of their family

[11:32.92]if they wish through more effective means of birth control.

[11:36.41]Different attitudes to religion,

[11:37.93]authority and tradition

[11:39.39]generally have also greatly contributed

[11:41.77]to changes in family life.

[11:43.58]But these developments have affected all aspects of society.

[11:46.68]It is particularly interesting to note

[11:48.73]that the concept of "the family"

[11:50.26]as a social unit has survived all these challenges.

[11:55.27]Questions 20 to 22 are based on the passage you have just heard.

[12:01.66]20. What is this passage mainly about?

[12:19.93]21. Why did British women become indispensable to industry

[12:24.12]after World War Ⅱ?

[12:40.23]22. What remained unchanged in spite of

[12:43.99]all the challenges to family life?

[13:00.73]Passage Three

[13:02.44]There is, perhaps, no other sport in the world

[13:04.80]quite so exciting as skiing.

[13:07.09]For viewers, it is a spectacle of unsurpassed beauty.

[13:10.48]For skiers, it is a vivid personal experience,

[13:13.48]a thrilling test of mind, muscle and nerves.

[13:17.13]More and more Americans are discovering this thrill for themselves.

[13:20.76]Not too long ago,

[13:22.08]skiing had virtually no part in the American sport scene.

[13:26.07]If it were thought of at all,

[13:27.60]it was purely as a European sport.

[13:30.57]Then came the 1932 Winter Olympics at Lake Placid, New York.

[13:35.26]Americans got their first good look at skiing and made for the hills.

[13:39.01]Today skitrains make regular runs from our cities to the great,

[13:42.63]white outdoors.

[13:44.33]In addition to joy and exhilaration, skiing offers other attractions.

[13:48.63]It is a comparatively inexpensive sport, and for the young,

[13:51.83]the art of skiing is often mastered in a very short time.

[13:57.14]Questions 23 to 25 are based on the passage you have just heard.

[14:01.78]23. What is the author's opinion of skiing?

[14:20.28]24. What is the origin of skiing?

[14:38.46]25. Which of the following is not true according to the passage?

[15:00.02]Section C

[15:01.75]With Earth's power consumption forecast

[15:03.38]to rocket to new highs in coming decades,

[15:05.93]one scientist is proposing a suitably far out solution

[15:09.13]to the likely energy shortage

[15:10.70]— power plants on the moon.

[15:12.47]Professor David Criswell of the University

[15:14.55]of Houston's Institute for Space Systems

[15:16.89]said that lunar power plants that capture the sun's rays

[15:19.72]and sent them on to Earth

[15:21.20]as concentrated microwave beams

[15:23.56]could provide inexpensive abundant and stable energy

[15:26.61]for the Earth's growing population.

[15:28.75]Criswell's plan involves setting up solar panels

[15:31.30]at numerous lunar installation to collect the sun's rays.

[15:35.23]This energy could then be converted into a microwave beam

[15:38.48]and sent to receivers on Earth,

[15:40.27]where it would be easily converted into electricity

[15:42.72]that could be plugged into the power grid.

[15:44.93]The microwave energy beam,

[15:46.27]which could pass through rain and clouds,

[15:48.19]would have the intensity of about 20 percent

[15:50.35]of moontime sunlight

[15:51.79]and would be perfectly safe

[15:53.32]with only a slight problem of local radio interference, he said.

[15:56.90]Criswell said that most of his lunar power plants

[15:59.28]could be easily constructed from materials

[16:01.22]already found on the moon,

[16:02.84]and that they were technologically simple enough to wire up quickly.

[16:08.55]With Earth's power consumption forecast

[16:12.05]to rocket to new highs in coming decades,

[16:15.77]one scientist is proposing a suitably far out solution

[16:18.89]to the likely energy shortage

[16:21.89]— power plants on the moon.

[16:23.53]Professor David Criswell of the University

[16:25.56]of Houston's Institute for Space Systems

[16:27.94]said that lunar power plants that capture the sun's rays

[16:33.76]and sent them on to Earth

[16:35.53]as concentrated microwave beams

[16:39.15]could provide inexpensive abundant and stable energy

[16:43.76]for the Earth's growing population.

[16:45.90]Criswell's plan involves setting up solar panels

[16:48.30]at numerous lunar installation to collect the sun's rays.

[16:53.55]This energy could then be converted into a microwave beam

[16:56.81]and sent to receivers on Earth,

[16:58.67]where it would be easily converted into electricity

[17:01.14]that could be plugged into the power grid.

[17:50.79]The microwave energy beam,

[17:53.53]which could pass through rain and clouds,

[17:55.52]would have the intensity of about 20 percent

[17:57.69]of moontime sunlight

[17:59.13]and would be perfectly safe

[18:00.75]with only a slight problem of local radio interference, he said.

[18:51.78]Criswell said that most of his lunar power plants

[18:54.22]could be easily constructed from materials

[18:56.04]already found on the moon,

[18:57.65]and that they were technologically simple enough to wire up quickly.

[19:50.45]With Earth's power consumption forecast

[19:52.14]to rocket to new highs in coming decades,

[19:54.55]one scientist is proposing a suitably far out solution

[19:57.71]to the likely energy shortage

[19:59.33]— power plants on the moon.

[20:01.15]Professor David Criswell of the University

[20:03.21]of Houston's Institute for Space Systems

[20:05.53]said that lunar power plants that capture the sun's rays

[20:08.38]and sent them on to Earth

[20:10.07]as concentrated microwave beams

[20:12.22]could provide inexpensive abundant and stable energy

[20:15.30]for the Earth's growing population.

[20:17.41]Criswell's plan involves setting up solar panels

[20:19.97]at numerous lunar installation to collect the sun's rays.

[20:23.91]This energy could then be converted into a microwave beam

[20:27.14]and sent to receivers on Earth,

[20:28.95]where it would be easily converted into electricity

[20:31.43]that could be plugged into the power grid.

[20:33.60]The microwave energy beam,

[20:34.94]which could pass through rain and clouds,

[20:36.84]would have the intensity of about 20 percent

[20:39.06]of moontime sunlight

[20:40.35]and would be perfectly safe

[20:41.97]with only a slight problem of local radio interference, he said.

[20:45.55]Criswell said that most of his lunar power plants

[20:47.92]could be easily constructed from materials

[20:50.02]already found on the moon,

[20:51.36]and that they were technologically simple enough to wire up quickly.
[00:01.26]Test Eight [00:03.07]Section A [00:04.78]1.W: Can you tell me back to the service station? [00:08.68]I've run out of gas. [00:09.98]M: That's not necessary. [00:11.18]I have a spare can of gas with me. [00:13.91]Q: What is the woman's problem? [00:31.70]2. W: Well, maybe you are right. [00:34.58]I should do more exercises in order to lose weight. [00:37.38]M: Actually it depends on yourself. [00:38.98]You must have a strong will. [00:41.56]Q: What does the man suggest the woman do? [00:60.00]3. W: Can you listen for my telephone? [01:03.09]M: Sure. I'm planning to be here all day. [01:05.97]Q: What does the woman want the man to do? [01:24.52]4. M: I have an appointment to see Dr. Gram [01:27.82]for a physical examination. [01:29.42]W: Please have a seat. She's in surgery right now. [01:33.02]Q: Where does the conversation most probably take place? [01:52.16]5. M: Why are you laughing at me? [01:54.99]W: Because you looked so funny in your new shorts. [01:58.33]Q: What's the man wearing? [02:15.83]6. M: Is your mother home? [02:18.53]W: I'm afraid she's not here right now. [02:20.28]You could call back later. [02:22.32]Q: Where is the mother? [02:39.77]7.M: Will you be here at 12:00? [02:43.14]W: No,I'll be thirty minutes late. [02:46.04]Q: When will the woman arrive? [03:04.03]8. W: I certainly enjoyed my dinner! How was yours? [03:08.11]M: Better than I expected [03:09.36]since I'm not very fond of Italian food. [03:11.49]For that price, it should have been good. [03:14.06]Q: What conclusion can we draw from the man's answer? [03:33.12]Conversation One [03:35.02]W: Let's go into the penguin house. [03:36.79]M: Great! I read that they've added [03:38.55]a couple of emperor penguins from Antarctica. [03:41.19]W: I was hoping to stay in the warmer section. [03:43.54]You know, they have some penguins here [03:45.14]from the Gal pagos Islands [03:46.93]— and that's practically on the equator. [03:49.02]M: But the emperor penguin's huge! [03:50.81]It's a lot bigger than the Gal pagos penguin [03:53.03]— in fact, it's bigger than all the other penguins [03:55.05]— almost four feet high. [03:56.58]W: Imagine a bird that size flying through the air … [03:59.75]M: Penguins don't actually fly. [04:01.54]W: I know that. They just sort of … waddle. [04:04.35]M: They swim, too. Even though they're feathered, [04:06.86]their wings are more like flippers [04:08.61]— they work like paddles in the water. [04:10.71]W: I thought they were land animals. [04:12.56]M: They lay their eggs on land. [04:13.95]They make their nests in these enormous colonies called rookeries. [04:17.43]See, the emperor penguin has this interesting nesting habit. [04:20.78]The female bird leaves the ocean at the beginning of autumn. [04:23.75]She lays an egg on the ice [04:25.02]and then immediately returns to the water. [04:26.99]W: What happens to the egg? [04:28.49]M: The male rolls it onto his feet [04:30.12]and then covers it with the lower part of his belly. [04:32.47]W: Then what? [04:33.39]M: For two whole months, [04:34.46]during the worst part of the winter, [04:36.06]he huddles together with other male penguins [04:37.89]to keep the eggs warm. [04:39.64]W: So the female brings him food? [04:41.54]M: No. See, the penguin can fast for up to four months. [04:44.66]The female comes back after the chick hatches. [04:47.00]When she does, the male goes out to sea [04:49.54]to get food for himself and the chick. [04:53.33]Questions 9 to 12 are based on the conversation you have just heard. [04:57.62]9. Why does the man want to visit the penguin house? [05:16.34]10. What is unique about the emperor penguin? [05:34.55]11. What does the man say about the wings of the penguin? [05:53.57]12. What does the male emperor penguin do [05:57.00]after the female lays an egg? [06:13.68]Conversation Two [06:15.68]W: Could I see the Manager, please? I have a complaint. [06:17.99]M: Can I help you, madam? [06:19.25]W: Yes. Did you have this room checked before we moved in? [06:22.33]There's not a scrap of lavatory paper [06:24.58]and the toilet doesn't flush properly, [06:26.79]the water doesn't run away in the shower [06:28.81]and I would like an extra pillow. [06:30.61]What have you to say to that? [06:32.53]M: I'm extremely sorry to hear that. [06:34.27]I'll attend to it right away. [06:35.91]The housekeeper usually checks every room [06:37.67]before new guests move in. [06:39.48]We have been extremely busy with a large conference. [06:42.12]W: That's no way to run a hotel. [06:44.30]One doesn't expect this sort of thing in a well—run hotel. [06:47.53]M: No, madam. I do apologize. It's most unusual. [06:50.35]We do try to check the rooms as thoroughly as possible. [06:53.14]Just the one pillow, was it? [06:54.61]Is there anything else? [06:55.96]W: Well, your thermostatically controlled air-conditioning [06:58.40]doesn't seem to be working too well. [07:00.56]It's as hot as hell up there. [07:02.68]M: I'll just adjust the regulator for you [07:04.69]and I think you'll find it a little cooler in a short time. [07:07.78]I'll also send someone along right away [07:09.71]to look at the toilet and shower. [07:13.31]Questions 13 to 15 are based on the conversation you have just heard. [07:17.93]13. What is the woman complaining about? [07:36.33]14. Which of the following is not a problem mentioned by the woman? [07:55.65]15. How many problems does the woman complain about? [08:16.73]Section B [08:18.45]Passage One [08:19.96]Do you have trouble in sleeping at night? [08:22.30]Then maybe this is for you. [08:24.18]When you worry about needing sleep and twist around, [08:26.84]trying to find a comfortable position, [08:28.92]you're probably only making matters worse. [08:31.85]What happens is that your heart rate actually increases, [08:35.00]making it more difficult to relax. [08:37.43]You may also have some bad habits that contribute to the problem. [08:41.41]Do you rest frequently during the day? [08:43.85]Do you get virtually no exercise, [08:45.83]or do you exercise strenuously late in the day? [08:48.99]Do you think about sleep a lot or sleep late on the weekend? [08:53.30]Any or all of these factors might be leading to your insomnia [08:56.82]by disrupting your body's natural rhythm. [08:59.65]What should you do then on those sleepless nights? [09:02.52]Don't bother with sleeping pills. [09:04.56]They can actually cause worse insomnia later. [09:07.67]The best thing to do is to drink milk, or eat cheese or tuna fish. [09:11.78]They are all rich in amino acid that help produce [09:14.27]a neurotransmitter in the brain that induces sleep. [09:17.82]This neurotran smitter will help you relax [09:20.16]and you'll be on the way to getting a good night's sleep. [09:23.15]Until tomorrow's broadcast, [09:24.74]it has been another in the series [09:26.27]Hints for Good Health by Dr. Goodson. [09:30.46]Questions 16 to 19 are based on the passage you have just heard. [09:34.66]16. What happens when you turn [09:37.10]and twist to get comfortable according to the passage? [09:54.83]17. What sometimes causes people to have trouble sleeping [09:58.96]according to the passage? [10:15.35]18. What does the speaker say about sleeping pills? [10:34.04]19. Where is the talk most probably being given? [10:52.98]Passage Two [10:54.65]There are many reasons why family life in Britain [10:56.83]has changed so much in the last fifty years. [10:59.39]The liberation of women in the early part of the twentieth century [11:02.47]and the social and economic effects of World War Ⅱ [11:05.51]had a great impact on traditional family life. [11:08.11]Women became essential to industry and the professions. [11:11.33]During the war they had worked in factories and proved their worth, [11:14.83]now, with the loss of millions of men, [11:16.86]their services were indispensable to the nation. [11:19.51]More recently, great advances in scientific knowledge, [11:21.80]and particularly in medicine, [11:23.40]have had enormous social consequences. [11:25.68]Children are better cared for and are far healthier. [11:28.56]Infant death rate is low. [11:30.21]Above all, parents can now plan the size of their family [11:32.92]if they wish through more effective means of birth control. [11:36.41]Different attitudes to religion, [11:37.93]authority and tradition [11:39.39]generally have also greatly contributed [11:41.77]to changes in family life. [11:43.58]But these developments have affected all aspects of society. [11:46.68]It is particularly interesting to note [11:48.73]that the concept of "the family" [11:50.26]as a social unit has survived all these challenges. [11:55.27]Questions 20 to 22 are based on the passage you have just heard. [12:01.66]20. What is this passage mainly about? [12:19.93]21. Why did British women become indispensable to industry [12:24.12]after World War Ⅱ? [12:40.23]22. What remained unchanged in spite of [12:43.99]all the challenges to family life? [13:00.73]Passage Three [13:02.44]There is, perhaps, no other sport in the world [13:04.80]quite so exciting as skiing. [13:07.09]For viewers, it is a spectacle of unsurpassed beauty. [13:10.48]For skiers, it is a vivid personal experience, [13:13.48]a thrilling test of mind, muscle and nerves. [13:17.13]More and more Americans are discovering this thrill for themselves. [13:20.76]Not too long ago, [13:22.08]skiing had virtually no part in the American sport scene. [13:26.07]If it were thought of at all, [13:27.60]it was purely as a European sport. [13:30.57]Then came the 1932 Winter Olympics at Lake Placid, New York. [13:35.26]Americans got their first good look at skiing and made for the hills. [13:39.01]Today skitrains make regular runs from our cities to the great, [13:42.63]white outdoors. [13:44.33]In addition to joy and exhilaration, skiing offers other attractions. [13:48.63]It is a comparatively inexpensive sport, and for the young, [13:51.83]the art of skiing is often mastered in a very short time. [13:57.14]Questions 23 to 25 are based on the passage you have just heard. [14:01.78]23. What is the author's opinion of skiing? [14:20.28]24. What is the origin of skiing? [14:38.46]25. Which of the following is not true according to the passage? [15:00.02]Section C [15:01.75]With Earth's power consumption forecast [15:03.38]to rocket to new highs in coming decades, [15:05.93]one scientist is proposing a suitably far out solution [15:09.13]to the likely energy shortage [15:10.70]— power plants on the moon. [15:12.47]Professor David Criswell of the University [15:14.55]of Houston's Institute for Space Systems [15:16.89]said that lunar power plants that capture the sun's rays [15:19.72]and sent them on to Earth [15:21.20]as concentrated microwave beams [15:23.56]could provide inexpensive abundant and stable energy [15:26.61]for the Earth's growing population. [15:28.75]Criswell's plan involves setting up solar panels [15:31.30]at numerous lunar installation to collect the sun's rays. [15:35.23]This energy could then be converted into a microwave beam [15:38.48]and sent to receivers on Earth, [15:40.27]where it would be easily converted into electricity [15:42.72]that could be plugged into the power grid. [15:44.93]The microwave energy beam, [15:46.27]which could pass through rain and clouds, [15:48.19]would have the intensity of about 20 percent [15:50.35]of moontime sunlight [15:51.79]and would be perfectly safe [15:53.32]with only a slight problem of local radio interference, he said. [15:56.90]Criswell said that most of his lunar power plants [15:59.28]could be easily constructed from materials [16:01.22]already found on the moon, [16:02.84]and that they were technologically simple enough to wire up quickly. [16:08.55]With Earth's power consumption forecast [16:12.05]to rocket to new highs in coming decades, [16:15.77]one scientist is proposing a suitably far out solution [16:18.89]to the likely energy shortage [16:21.89]— power plants on the moon. [16:23.53]Professor David Criswell of the University [16:25.56]of Houston's Institute for Space Systems [16:27.94]said that lunar power plants that capture the sun's rays [16:33.76]and sent them on to Earth [16:35.53]as concentrated microwave beams [16:39.15]could provide inexpensive abundant and stable energy [16:43.76]for the Earth's growing population. [16:45.90]Criswell's plan involves setting up solar panels [16:48.30]at numerous lunar installation to collect the sun's rays. [16:53.55]This energy could then be converted into a microwave beam [16:56.81]and sent to receivers on Earth, [16:58.67]where it would be easily converted into electricity [17:01.14]that could be plugged into the power grid. [17:50.79]The microwave energy beam, [17:53.53]which could pass through rain and clouds, [17:55.52]would have the intensity of about 20 percent [17:57.69]of moontime sunlight [17:59.13]and would be perfectly safe [18:00.75]with only a slight problem of local radio interference, he said. [18:51.78]Criswell said that most of his lunar power plants [18:54.22]could be easily constructed from materials [18:56.04]already found on the moon, [18:57.65]and that they were technologically simple enough to wire up quickly. [19:50.45]With Earth's power consumption forecast [19:52.14]to rocket to new highs in coming decades, [19:54.55]one scientist is proposing a suitably far out solution [19:57.71]to the likely energy shortage [19:59.33]— power plants on the moon. [20:01.15]Professor David Criswell of the University [20:03.21]of Houston's Institute for Space Systems [20:05.53]said that lunar power plants that capture the sun's rays [20:08.38]and sent them on to Earth [20:10.07]as concentrated microwave beams [20:12.22]could provide inexpensive abundant and stable energy [20:15.30]for the Earth's growing population. [20:17.41]Criswell's plan involves setting up solar panels [20:19.97]at numerous lunar installation to collect the sun's rays. [20:23.91]This energy could then be converted into a microwave beam [20:27.14]and sent to receivers on Earth, [20:28.95]where it would be easily converted into electricity [20:31.43]that could be plugged into the power grid. [20:33.60]The microwave energy beam, [20:34.94]which could pass through rain and clouds, [20:36.84]would have the intensity of about 20 percent [20:39.06]of moontime sunlight [20:40.35]and would be perfectly safe [20:41.97]with only a slight problem of local radio interference, he said. [20:45.55]Criswell said that most of his lunar power plants [20:47.92]could be easily constructed from materials [20:50.02]already found on the moon, [20:51.36]and that they were technologically simple enough to wire up quickly.
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