四级考试巅峰训练一本通 Test 3

韩萱 2011-11-04 8207 阅读
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[00:01.68]Test Three
[00:03.49]Section A
[00:05.43]1.W: Weren't you nervous when the professor called on you in class?
[00:10.07]M: I'd say I was shaking all over.
[00:12.69]Q: How did the man feel when he was called on?
[00:31.27]2. M: I haven't received the furniture I ordered yet.
[00:35.34]Maybe I should call to check on it.
[00:37.55]W: Don't worry. It takes at least a week to arrive.
[00:41.21]Q: What does the woman think the man should do?
[00:59.97]3. M: What's the time for departure?
[01:03.67]W: 5:30. That only leaves us 15 minutes
[01:06.47]to go through the customs and check our baggage.
[01:09.75]Q: At what time did the conversation take place?
[01:28.82]4. M: Jack won't go to the meeting
[01:32.04]because he has promised an appointment to a customer.
[01:34.72]W: Paul has to work and Tom has to study,
[01:37.11]so they won't go, either!
[01:39.25]Q: Why isn't Jack going to the meeting?
[01:57.61]5. W: How did Mike do in the course?
[02:01.40]M: Well, he had a good start, but he quickly fell behind.
[02:05.56]Q: What can be concluded from the conversation?
[02:24.44]6. W: Some people are going to cook different dishes,
[02:28.40]and Linda's going to bring beer and punch.
[02:31.02]I'm going to bring hamburgers and hot dogs.
[02:33.51]M: That sounds great. Listen,
[02:35.29]I'm going to do some shopping tonight.
[02:37.33]I can get some paper plates, plastic forks, knives and spoons.
[02:42.24]Q: What is the man not going to buy?
[03:00.88]7. M: We would like a two bedroom apartment,
[03:04.60]but if it's too expensive, we'll have to take a one bedroom.
[03:07.85]W: I have a really nice two bedroom available next week.
[03:10.98]It was just fixed up last month, all cleaned and painted.
[03:15.07]Q: What was done to the apartment last month?
[03:33.70]8. M: I'd like to take those three out and return these.
[03:38.25]W: OK, but you are overdue.
[03:40.20]I'll have to charge you for two days.
[03:42.94]Q: Where did the conversation most likely take place?
[04:02.20]Conversation One
[04:03.76]M: Hey, Michelle. Look what I just found. Right here in the sand.
[04:07.98]W: A piece of wood? Oh. Driftwood.
[04:10.61]Interesting shape …
[04:11.82]Almost like some sort of modern sculpture.
[04:14.41]M: Yeah. And feel how smooth it is.
[04:16.65]W: Hmm. Must've been in the water a long time.
[04:19.89]It could've been drifting in the ocean currents for months,
[04:22.42]or even years.
[04:23.48]M: In the currents? Doesn't the wind just blow things around out there?
[04:27.61]W: Well, sure. But the currents are always moving, too.
[04:30.96]Almost like rivers, but underwater rivers, flowing through the ocean.
[04:35.08]M: So how do they find out where these currents go?
[04:37.69]Stick a message in a bottle and throw it in the water?
[04:40.84]W: Don't laugh.
[04:41.86]In fact, I was reading in a science magazine
[04:44.60]that oceanographers have released huge numbers of bottles
[04:47.77]into the ocean over the years.
[04:50.04]They wanted to map out where the currents would carry them.
[04:53.32]M: Say, I'll bet — after they found out
[04:55.92]where all those bottles ended up
[04:57.69]— they could enter all that data into a computer
[05:00.03]and make a pretty detailed model to …
[05:02.03]to show where the currents go.
[05:03.86]W: In fact, they did.
[05:05.23]And they also found a neat way to test that model.
[05:08.10]There was a freighter carrying sneakers from a factory in Asia.
[05:11.86]It was caught in a big storm and thousands of pairs of sneakers
[05:15.20]got dumped in the Pacific Ocean.
[05:16.89]M: Really? What a waste!
[05:18.53]W: Yeah. Turns out, though, that hundreds of these shoes
[05:21.50]started washing up on beaches somewhere near Seattle,
[05:24.65]just about where the computer models
[05:26.35]had predicted the currents would carry them.
[05:28.43]M: You mean all that stuff I find on the beaches
[05:31.62]might be part of some big scientific experiment?
[05:34.62]I thought it was all just trash!
[05:38.05]Questions 9 to 12 are based on the conversation you have just heard.
[05:42.76]9. What are the speakers mainly discussing?
[06:01.07]10. What did the man find on the beach?
[06:19.38]11. According to the magazine article,
[06:22.77]what did scientists put into the ocean?
[06:39.75]12. What can be inferred from the story about the sneakers?
[06:59.26]Conversation Two
[07:01.33]M: And now here's our guest, Jane Thomas,
[07:03.76]to tell us about Montreal's famous yearly Island Bicycle Tour,
[07:07.69]which is coming up in June.
[07:09.48]Good morning, Jane.
[07:10.90]What's the bike tour all about?
[07:12.80]W: Were, Peter, it's an event that's open to anybody
[07:15.30]who'd like to ride a bicycle through the streets of Montreal.
[07:18.61]The tour covers a standard distance of 65 kilometers,
[07:22.12]but the route's quite different every year;
[07:24.21]so even people who have already done it might enjoy doing it again.
[07:28.46]M: How long does it take to go the whole distance?
[07:30.92]W: It varies … Cyclists are free to go as fast or as slow
[07:34.85]and do as much or as little of the course as they like.
[07:38.25]M: Well, what's the typical pace for a participant?
[07:41.52]W: Between 12 and 30 kilometers per hour.
[07:44.65]Some cyclists stop along the way
[07:46.68]and don't cross the finish line until early evening.
[07:49.76]But the whole point is that there's no rush — it's not a race.
[07:53.24]M: I understand last year's tour had 45,000 cyclists
[07:56.97]and was the largest mass cycling event in the world.
[07:59.98]How many do you expect this year?
[08:01.88]W: The same as last year.
[08:03.52]And since we regularly have so many participants,
[08:06.54]can I take this opportunity to remind our listeners to sign up early?
[08:10.60]We filled up quickly last year,
[08:12.26]and we had to refuse lots of applications.
[08:15.15]M: Before we close, any other tips for prospective cyclists?
[08:18.67]W: Yes. Take water with you.
[08:21.06]It is available at the relay stations,
[08:23.29]but it helps to have an additional supply.
[08:25.72]And pack a good lunch with plenty of fruit for energy.
[08:28.70]Candy and chocolate don't do the trick.
[08:32.72]Questions 13 to 15 are based on the conversation you have just heard.
[08:37.46]13. What is the main subject of the conversation?
[08:56.28]14. According to the woman, what is different every year?
[09:15.41]15. What does the woman imply about the participants?
[09:36.63]Section B
[09:38.59]Passage One
[09:40.43]Cambridge is about 90 kilometers northeast of London.
[09:44.19]It is one of the most beautiful places in Britain.
[09:47.21]Everything about the city of Cambridge reminds you
[09:49.49]of its famous university:
[09:51.53]students on bicycles, an atmosphere of learning,
[09:54.86]traditions and the magnificent buildings of the 30 colleges
[09:58.27]that are the University of Cambridge.
[10:00.65]Most of the colleges stand on the bend of the Cam River,
[10:04.17]a gentle river that flows through the heart of the city.
[10:07.69]Tourists and students like boating in a kind of flat bottom boat
[10:11.44]to see the colleges or to relax themselves.
[10:15.03]If the water traffic reminds the visitor of Venice,
[10:18.17]the road traffic is more likely to recall Beijing or Amsterdam.
[10:22.76]The streets are full of bicycles,
[10:24.49]hundreds and hundreds of them.
[10:26.70]They provide a cheap form of transport for the students
[10:29.57]and a very convenient way of getting
[10:31.35]around the streets in Cambridge.
[10:35.13]Questions 16 to 18 are based on the passage you have just heard.
[10:39.63]16. What do tourists enjoy doing in Cambridge for relaxation?
[10:59.49]17. Why does the road traffic in Cambridge remind one of Beijing?
[11:19.58]18. What is the speaker's impression of Cambridge?
[11:38.14]Passage Two
[11:40.00]Dear Editor:
[11:41.24]As an English teacher,
[11:42.52]I must disagree with Thomas Perkins,
[11:45.05]whose letter appeared in your newspaper on June 28.
[11:48.59]He complains that people no longer speak correctly
[11:51.88]and that the schools should do something to solve this problem.
[11:55.17]Naturally, teachers are aware that grammar is important,
[11:58.57]but languages are always changing.
[12:00.82]If Mr. Perkins doesn't believe this,
[12:03.04]he should look at the language of Shakespeare's time.
[12:05.65]Much of it sounds strange to us,
[12:07.60]and some of it is very hard to understand.
[12:10.10]Yet I'm sure that even Mr. Perkins
[12:11.88]would agree that Shakespeare's English was correct.
[12:15.17]If Mr. Perkins thinks that it is unfair to go back
[12:17.82]almost four hundred years,
[12:19.49]he should look at the 1918 grammar text,
[12:22.09]Outline of English Grammar, by J. C. Nesfield.
[12:25.23]He will find words such as "hither," "thither," and "whither,"
[12:29.52]which have all been replaced by "here," "there," and "where."
[12:33.29]The present perfect has also changed.
[12:35.51]Fifty years ago it was correct to say "hast".
[12:38.70]In fact,according to those rules,
[12:40.72]Mr.Perkins should have written,
[12:42.47]"What hast happened to the grammar rules
[12:44.36]I learned when I was a boy?"
[12:46.44]It is important to remember that while we are teaching the rules,
[12:49.76]they are in the process of changing.
[12:53.28]Questions 19 to 22 are based on the passage you have just heard.
[12:57.94]19. Who is the letter addressing?
[13:15.96]20. What does Thomas Perkins complain about?
[13:22.50]21. Where did Thomas Perkins publish his letter?
[13:41.51]22. Which is not true about the changes of the English language?
[14:01.52]Passage Three
[14:03.52]"Fingers were made before forks."
[14:06.04]When a person gives up good manners,
[14:07.97]puts aside knife and fork, and dives into his food,
[14:11.23]someone is likely to repeat that saying.
[14:14.00]The fork was an ancient agricultural tool,
[14:16.70]but for centuries no one thought of eating with it.
[14:19.62]Not until the eleventh century,
[14:21.45]when a young lady from Constantinople brought her fork to Italy,
[14:25.13]did the custom reach Europe.
[14:27.20]By the fifteenth century the use of the fork was widespread in Italy.
[14:31.11]The English explanation was that Italians
[14:33.73]were averse to eating food touched with fingers,
[14:36.82]"seeing all men's fingers are not alike in cleanliness."
[14:41.03]English travelers kept their friends in stitches
[14:43.51]while describing this ridiculous Italian custom.
[14:46.80]Anyone who used a fork to eat with was laughed at in England
[14:50.17]for the next hundred years.
[14:52.32]Men who used forks were thought to be sissies,
[14:55.22]and women who used them were called show offs and overnice.
[14:59.57]Not until the late 1600's did using a fork become a common custom.
[15:05.89]Questions 23 to 25 are based on the passage you have just heard.
[15:11.25]23. From where was the custom of eating with a fork brought to Europe?
[15:31.15]24. What is the aim of using a fork for an Italian according to the English?
[15:51.87]25. In England how did people consider those who used forks?
[16:14.06]Section C
[16:15.83]Who will run into the New Year first?
[16:18.31]Could you test your knowledge by trying these questions?
[16:21.50]An island in the Pacific Ocean celebrated the New Millennium first.
[16:25.36]One hour later,
[16:26.47]New Zealand became the first industrial nation to enter the new century.
[16:30.44]In China, President Jiang lit a fire
[16:33.25]to represent thousands of years of Chinese civilization.
[16:36.55]The traditional Chinese New Year begins in February.
[16:39.63]Russia covering two continents
[16:41.62]will have the world's longest New Year celebrations.
[16:44.47]The first day of the New Year will move westward from Asia
[16:47.46]to North and South America
[16:49.18]before ending in Tahiti on the eastern side of the International Date Line.
[16:53.18]US officials are increasing security
[16:55.24]as the nation prepares for New Year's celebrations.
[16:58.39]In Washington many police or security officials
[17:01.29]are guarding hundreds of thousands of people
[17:03.12]near some of the city's famous buildings.
[17:05.54]President Clinton is taking part in a program there
[17:08.77]to mark the next one thousand years,
[17:10.40]the New Millennium.
[17:11.62]Officials in California are increasing security
[17:14.15]after someone stole ninety kilograms of explosives.
[17:19.80]Who will run into the New Year first?
[17:22.27]Could you test your knowledge by trying these questions?
[17:25.47]An island in the Pacific Ocean celebrated the New Millennium first.
[17:30.34]One hour later,
[17:31.40]New Zealand became the first industrial nation to enter the new century.
[17:36.45]In China, President Jiang lit a fire
[17:40.40]to represent thousands of years of Chinese civilization.
[17:45.52]The traditional Chinese New Year begins in February.
[17:48.64]Russia covering two continents
[17:51.61]will have the world's longest New Year celebrations.
[17:54.56]The first day of the New Year will move westward from Asia
[17:58.45]to North and South America
[18:00.17]before ending in Tahiti on the eastern side of the International Date Line.
[18:05.21]US officials are increasing security
[18:07.19]as the nation prepares for New Year's celebrations.
[19:00.43]In Washington many police or security officials
[19:03.26]are guarding hundreds of thousands of people
[19:05.13]near some of the city's famous buildings.
[19:07.57]President Clinton is taking part in a program there
[19:10.34]to mark the next one thousand years,
[20:02.39]the New Millennium.
[20:03.65]Officials in California are increasing security
[20:06.18]after someone stole ninety kilograms of explosives.
[20:57.25]Who will run into the New Year first?
[20:59.68]Could you test your knowledge by trying these questions?
[21:02.92]An island in the Pacific Ocean celebrated the New Millennium first.
[21:06.73]One hour later,
[21:07.82]New Zealand became the first industrial nation to enter the new century.
[21:11.82]In China, President Jiang lit a fire
[21:14.63]to represent thousands of years of Chinese civilization.
[21:17.87]The traditional Chinese New Year begins in February.
[21:20.97]Russia covering two continents
[21:22.98]will have the world's longest New Year celebrations.
[21:25.78]The first day of the New Year will move westward from Asia
[21:28.77]to North and South America
[21:30.52]before ending in Tahiti on the eastern side of the International Date Line.
[21:34.53]US officials are increasing security
[21:36.63]as the nation prepares for New Year's celebrations.
[21:39.77]In Washington many police or security officials
[21:42.58]are guarding hundreds of thousands of people
[21:44.45]near some of the city's famous buildings.
[21:46.79]President Clinton is taking part in a program there
[21:50.02]to mark the next one thousand years,
[21:51.60]the New Millennium.
[21:52.98]Officials in California are increasing security
[21:55.51]after someone stole ninety kilograms of explosives.
[00:01.68]Test Three [00:03.49]Section A [00:05.43]1.W: Weren't you nervous when the professor called on you in class? [00:10.07]M: I'd say I was shaking all over. [00:12.69]Q: How did the man feel when he was called on? [00:31.27]2. M: I haven't received the furniture I ordered yet. [00:35.34]Maybe I should call to check on it. [00:37.55]W: Don't worry. It takes at least a week to arrive. [00:41.21]Q: What does the woman think the man should do? [00:59.97]3. M: What's the time for departure? [01:03.67]W: 5:30. That only leaves us 15 minutes [01:06.47]to go through the customs and check our baggage. [01:09.75]Q: At what time did the conversation take place? [01:28.82]4. M: Jack won't go to the meeting [01:32.04]because he has promised an appointment to a customer. [01:34.72]W: Paul has to work and Tom has to study, [01:37.11]so they won't go, either! [01:39.25]Q: Why isn't Jack going to the meeting? [01:57.61]5. W: How did Mike do in the course? [02:01.40]M: Well, he had a good start, but he quickly fell behind. [02:05.56]Q: What can be concluded from the conversation? [02:24.44]6. W: Some people are going to cook different dishes, [02:28.40]and Linda's going to bring beer and punch. [02:31.02]I'm going to bring hamburgers and hot dogs. [02:33.51]M: That sounds great. Listen, [02:35.29]I'm going to do some shopping tonight. [02:37.33]I can get some paper plates, plastic forks, knives and spoons. [02:42.24]Q: What is the man not going to buy? [03:00.88]7. M: We would like a two bedroom apartment, [03:04.60]but if it's too expensive, we'll have to take a one bedroom. [03:07.85]W: I have a really nice two bedroom available next week. [03:10.98]It was just fixed up last month, all cleaned and painted. [03:15.07]Q: What was done to the apartment last month? [03:33.70]8. M: I'd like to take those three out and return these. [03:38.25]W: OK, but you are overdue. [03:40.20]I'll have to charge you for two days. [03:42.94]Q: Where did the conversation most likely take place? [04:02.20]Conversation One [04:03.76]M: Hey, Michelle. Look what I just found. Right here in the sand. [04:07.98]W: A piece of wood? Oh. Driftwood. [04:10.61]Interesting shape … [04:11.82]Almost like some sort of modern sculpture. [04:14.41]M: Yeah. And feel how smooth it is. [04:16.65]W: Hmm. Must've been in the water a long time. [04:19.89]It could've been drifting in the ocean currents for months, [04:22.42]or even years. [04:23.48]M: In the currents? Doesn't the wind just blow things around out there? [04:27.61]W: Well, sure. But the currents are always moving, too. [04:30.96]Almost like rivers, but underwater rivers, flowing through the ocean. [04:35.08]M: So how do they find out where these currents go? [04:37.69]Stick a message in a bottle and throw it in the water? [04:40.84]W: Don't laugh. [04:41.86]In fact, I was reading in a science magazine [04:44.60]that oceanographers have released huge numbers of bottles [04:47.77]into the ocean over the years. [04:50.04]They wanted to map out where the currents would carry them. [04:53.32]M: Say, I'll bet — after they found out [04:55.92]where all those bottles ended up [04:57.69]— they could enter all that data into a computer [05:00.03]and make a pretty detailed model to … [05:02.03]to show where the currents go. [05:03.86]W: In fact, they did. [05:05.23]And they also found a neat way to test that model. [05:08.10]There was a freighter carrying sneakers from a factory in Asia. [05:11.86]It was caught in a big storm and thousands of pairs of sneakers [05:15.20]got dumped in the Pacific Ocean. [05:16.89]M: Really? What a waste! [05:18.53]W: Yeah. Turns out, though, that hundreds of these shoes [05:21.50]started washing up on beaches somewhere near Seattle, [05:24.65]just about where the computer models [05:26.35]had predicted the currents would carry them. [05:28.43]M: You mean all that stuff I find on the beaches [05:31.62]might be part of some big scientific experiment? [05:34.62]I thought it was all just trash! [05:38.05]Questions 9 to 12 are based on the conversation you have just heard. [05:42.76]9. What are the speakers mainly discussing? [06:01.07]10. What did the man find on the beach? [06:19.38]11. According to the magazine article, [06:22.77]what did scientists put into the ocean? [06:39.75]12. What can be inferred from the story about the sneakers? [06:59.26]Conversation Two [07:01.33]M: And now here's our guest, Jane Thomas, [07:03.76]to tell us about Montreal's famous yearly Island Bicycle Tour, [07:07.69]which is coming up in June. [07:09.48]Good morning, Jane. [07:10.90]What's the bike tour all about? [07:12.80]W: Were, Peter, it's an event that's open to anybody [07:15.30]who'd like to ride a bicycle through the streets of Montreal. [07:18.61]The tour covers a standard distance of 65 kilometers, [07:22.12]but the route's quite different every year; [07:24.21]so even people who have already done it might enjoy doing it again. [07:28.46]M: How long does it take to go the whole distance? [07:30.92]W: It varies … Cyclists are free to go as fast or as slow [07:34.85]and do as much or as little of the course as they like. [07:38.25]M: Well, what's the typical pace for a participant? [07:41.52]W: Between 12 and 30 kilometers per hour. [07:44.65]Some cyclists stop along the way [07:46.68]and don't cross the finish line until early evening. [07:49.76]But the whole point is that there's no rush — it's not a race. [07:53.24]M: I understand last year's tour had 45,000 cyclists [07:56.97]and was the largest mass cycling event in the world. [07:59.98]How many do you expect this year? [08:01.88]W: The same as last year. [08:03.52]And since we regularly have so many participants, [08:06.54]can I take this opportunity to remind our listeners to sign up early? [08:10.60]We filled up quickly last year, [08:12.26]and we had to refuse lots of applications. [08:15.15]M: Before we close, any other tips for prospective cyclists? [08:18.67]W: Yes. Take water with you. [08:21.06]It is available at the relay stations, [08:23.29]but it helps to have an additional supply. [08:25.72]And pack a good lunch with plenty of fruit for energy. [08:28.70]Candy and chocolate don't do the trick. [08:32.72]Questions 13 to 15 are based on the conversation you have just heard. [08:37.46]13. What is the main subject of the conversation? [08:56.28]14. According to the woman, what is different every year? [09:15.41]15. What does the woman imply about the participants? [09:36.63]Section B [09:38.59]Passage One [09:40.43]Cambridge is about 90 kilometers northeast of London. [09:44.19]It is one of the most beautiful places in Britain. [09:47.21]Everything about the city of Cambridge reminds you [09:49.49]of its famous university: [09:51.53]students on bicycles, an atmosphere of learning, [09:54.86]traditions and the magnificent buildings of the 30 colleges [09:58.27]that are the University of Cambridge. [10:00.65]Most of the colleges stand on the bend of the Cam River, [10:04.17]a gentle river that flows through the heart of the city. [10:07.69]Tourists and students like boating in a kind of flat bottom boat [10:11.44]to see the colleges or to relax themselves. [10:15.03]If the water traffic reminds the visitor of Venice, [10:18.17]the road traffic is more likely to recall Beijing or Amsterdam. [10:22.76]The streets are full of bicycles, [10:24.49]hundreds and hundreds of them. [10:26.70]They provide a cheap form of transport for the students [10:29.57]and a very convenient way of getting [10:31.35]around the streets in Cambridge. [10:35.13]Questions 16 to 18 are based on the passage you have just heard. [10:39.63]16. What do tourists enjoy doing in Cambridge for relaxation? [10:59.49]17. Why does the road traffic in Cambridge remind one of Beijing? [11:19.58]18. What is the speaker's impression of Cambridge? [11:38.14]Passage Two [11:40.00]Dear Editor: [11:41.24]As an English teacher, [11:42.52]I must disagree with Thomas Perkins, [11:45.05]whose letter appeared in your newspaper on June 28. [11:48.59]He complains that people no longer speak correctly [11:51.88]and that the schools should do something to solve this problem. [11:55.17]Naturally, teachers are aware that grammar is important, [11:58.57]but languages are always changing. [12:00.82]If Mr. Perkins doesn't believe this, [12:03.04]he should look at the language of Shakespeare's time. [12:05.65]Much of it sounds strange to us, [12:07.60]and some of it is very hard to understand. [12:10.10]Yet I'm sure that even Mr. Perkins [12:11.88]would agree that Shakespeare's English was correct. [12:15.17]If Mr. Perkins thinks that it is unfair to go back [12:17.82]almost four hundred years, [12:19.49]he should look at the 1918 grammar text, [12:22.09]Outline of English Grammar, by J. C. Nesfield. [12:25.23]He will find words such as "hither," "thither," and "whither," [12:29.52]which have all been replaced by "here," "there," and "where." [12:33.29]The present perfect has also changed. [12:35.51]Fifty years ago it was correct to say "hast". [12:38.70]In fact,according to those rules, [12:40.72]Mr.Perkins should have written, [12:42.47]"What hast happened to the grammar rules [12:44.36]I learned when I was a boy?" [12:46.44]It is important to remember that while we are teaching the rules, [12:49.76]they are in the process of changing. [12:53.28]Questions 19 to 22 are based on the passage you have just heard. [12:57.94]19. Who is the letter addressing? [13:15.96]20. What does Thomas Perkins complain about? [13:22.50]21. Where did Thomas Perkins publish his letter? [13:41.51]22. Which is not true about the changes of the English language? [14:01.52]Passage Three [14:03.52]"Fingers were made before forks." [14:06.04]When a person gives up good manners, [14:07.97]puts aside knife and fork, and dives into his food, [14:11.23]someone is likely to repeat that saying. [14:14.00]The fork was an ancient agricultural tool, [14:16.70]but for centuries no one thought of eating with it. [14:19.62]Not until the eleventh century, [14:21.45]when a young lady from Constantinople brought her fork to Italy, [14:25.13]did the custom reach Europe. [14:27.20]By the fifteenth century the use of the fork was widespread in Italy. [14:31.11]The English explanation was that Italians [14:33.73]were averse to eating food touched with fingers, [14:36.82]"seeing all men's fingers are not alike in cleanliness." [14:41.03]English travelers kept their friends in stitches [14:43.51]while describing this ridiculous Italian custom. [14:46.80]Anyone who used a fork to eat with was laughed at in England [14:50.17]for the next hundred years. [14:52.32]Men who used forks were thought to be sissies, [14:55.22]and women who used them were called show offs and overnice. [14:59.57]Not until the late 1600's did using a fork become a common custom. [15:05.89]Questions 23 to 25 are based on the passage you have just heard. [15:11.25]23. From where was the custom of eating with a fork brought to Europe? [15:31.15]24. What is the aim of using a fork for an Italian according to the English? [15:51.87]25. In England how did people consider those who used forks? [16:14.06]Section C [16:15.83]Who will run into the New Year first? [16:18.31]Could you test your knowledge by trying these questions? [16:21.50]An island in the Pacific Ocean celebrated the New Millennium first. [16:25.36]One hour later, [16:26.47]New Zealand became the first industrial nation to enter the new century. [16:30.44]In China, President Jiang lit a fire [16:33.25]to represent thousands of years of Chinese civilization. [16:36.55]The traditional Chinese New Year begins in February. [16:39.63]Russia covering two continents [16:41.62]will have the world's longest New Year celebrations. [16:44.47]The first day of the New Year will move westward from Asia [16:47.46]to North and South America [16:49.18]before ending in Tahiti on the eastern side of the International Date Line. [16:53.18]US officials are increasing security [16:55.24]as the nation prepares for New Year's celebrations. [16:58.39]In Washington many police or security officials [17:01.29]are guarding hundreds of thousands of people [17:03.12]near some of the city's famous buildings. [17:05.54]President Clinton is taking part in a program there [17:08.77]to mark the next one thousand years, [17:10.40]the New Millennium. [17:11.62]Officials in California are increasing security [17:14.15]after someone stole ninety kilograms of explosives. [17:19.80]Who will run into the New Year first? [17:22.27]Could you test your knowledge by trying these questions? [17:25.47]An island in the Pacific Ocean celebrated the New Millennium first. [17:30.34]One hour later, [17:31.40]New Zealand became the first industrial nation to enter the new century. [17:36.45]In China, President Jiang lit a fire [17:40.40]to represent thousands of years of Chinese civilization. [17:45.52]The traditional Chinese New Year begins in February. [17:48.64]Russia covering two continents [17:51.61]will have the world's longest New Year celebrations. [17:54.56]The first day of the New Year will move westward from Asia [17:58.45]to North and South America [18:00.17]before ending in Tahiti on the eastern side of the International Date Line. [18:05.21]US officials are increasing security [18:07.19]as the nation prepares for New Year's celebrations. [19:00.43]In Washington many police or security officials [19:03.26]are guarding hundreds of thousands of people [19:05.13]near some of the city's famous buildings. [19:07.57]President Clinton is taking part in a program there [19:10.34]to mark the next one thousand years, [20:02.39]the New Millennium. [20:03.65]Officials in California are increasing security [20:06.18]after someone stole ninety kilograms of explosives. [20:57.25]Who will run into the New Year first? [20:59.68]Could you test your knowledge by trying these questions? [21:02.92]An island in the Pacific Ocean celebrated the New Millennium first. [21:06.73]One hour later, [21:07.82]New Zealand became the first industrial nation to enter the new century. [21:11.82]In China, President Jiang lit a fire [21:14.63]to represent thousands of years of Chinese civilization. [21:17.87]The traditional Chinese New Year begins in February. [21:20.97]Russia covering two continents [21:22.98]will have the world's longest New Year celebrations. [21:25.78]The first day of the New Year will move westward from Asia [21:28.77]to North and South America [21:30.52]before ending in Tahiti on the eastern side of the International Date Line. [21:34.53]US officials are increasing security [21:36.63]as the nation prepares for New Year's celebrations. [21:39.77]In Washington many police or security officials [21:42.58]are guarding hundreds of thousands of people [21:44.45]near some of the city's famous buildings. [21:46.79]President Clinton is taking part in a program there [21:50.02]to mark the next one thousand years, [21:51.60]the New Millennium. [21:52.98]Officials in California are increasing security [21:55.51]after someone stole ninety kilograms of explosives.
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