综合英语(一)下册 lessonx12

juliaenglish2007 2008-06-30 1126 阅读
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Lesson Twelve:I Got My B.A. by Sheer Luck

1 NOW IT CAN BE TOLD: I got my B.A. by sheer luck. Here is my story.

2 Professor Kolb was especially difficult that year. Exactly 63.6 percent of the class failed Egyptian History. And if it were not for sheer luck, I'd have raised the ercentage to 65.4.

3 I remember most vividly the frightening pace of the lectures. No one could take notes as fast as "Old Kolb" talked. I usually missed more than half of each lecture. Without complete notes, it was impossible to study. I was lucky to have gotten even the 38 in one exam. I knew that my only chance for survival was to get fuller notes.

4 That night after the exam grades came out, I thought over my disgraceful grade.

Suddenly I hit upon an idea: Why not leave every other line on my note paper blank? Then I could recall the lecture afterward and fill in the missing parts.

5 The next day I tried this plan and it worked! What luck! At first it was difficult to recall the lecture, but as days passed, it became sort of a game. Often in my room I would imitate the professor and try to give the lecture as best as I could without looking at my notes.

6 One evening while reciting the day's lecture to myself, I made an important discovery. In trying to make my presentation as smooth as possible, I used the transitional words "Now that we have discussed the major reason for the success of Pharaoh Hophra, let us look at the minor reasons." At that moment I stopped still, for at no time did the professor ever cut up the lecture into topics and subtopics; however, the topics and subtopics were there, waiting to be discovered.With this secret in mind, I found that I could take better notes during the lecture,and after class I could very easily supply the missing parts.

7 An incident finally convinced me of my intellectual inferiority when I found that the other students just "flipped the pages" of the textbook. But poor me, I had to work on each chapter for hours. I was lucky when, looking in the library for a book on Egyptian religion, I ran across a whole shelf filled with books on Egypt. I spent the rest of the day until 10∶00 p.m. (closing time) reading. I finally picked out three books which were easy enough for me to understand, and I took these back to my room. By first reading these books, I found I could understand better the assigned chapter in the textbook. So with luck I solved the textbook problem.

8 There I was, as the final examination approached, with a notebook about two inches thick,filled with lecture notes. Now, was I to memorize all these notes? And the textbook? Realizing that I couldn't memorize everything in my notes, I decided to review each lecture with one thought in mind: "What is the really important idea here?" As I found the answer, I'd jot the central point on separate sheets which I called "Summary Sheets." When I finished, I had reduced inches of lecture notes to just twelve pages of "main issues."I then did the same with my textbook .

9 I learned these main issues by first reading them over, thinking about them, then without looking at my notes, by trying to recite them in my own words. I went through my summary sheets in the same way, issue by issue.

10 Having mastered these main issues, I composed ten questions —questions that I'd ask if I were the professor. I pretended that I was in the examination room, and I spent the next four hours answering my ten questions. I then corrected my answers by referring to the lecture and the textbook notes, and much to my delight, I had discussed all the facts and ideas accurately. For the first time I felt that I had achieved something. I went to bed at 10∶00 for a good night's sleep, having refused to go to a movie with the rest of the boys.

11 On the way to the examination room the next morning, I knew without question that my luck had run out when I met Jack, who sat next to me. He had not taken a single note all semester; he had not even "flipped" the textbook pages. When I asked why he wasn't nervous, he answered, "This is the semester for Examination Set #4."

12 "What's Examination Set # 4?"

13 Everybody on campus except me, I guess, knew that "Old Kolb" had five sets of

examinations (ten questions in every set),which he used in turn over a five-year period.Though "Old Kolb"collected the question sheets from each student, he underestimated their organizing ability. The plan worked like this: Some students were given the task to memorize question # 1, another group to memorize # 2, and so forth. When the students left the examination room, they jotted down these questions quickly from memory. In this way they finally collected all five sets of the examination.

14 I knew my luck had run out. As the examination sheets were passed out, I heard

moans of various kinds: "Oh, No ! No !" and hysterical laughter. I thought that perhaps the professor had by mistake given out Exam # 5 instead of the expected # 4.

15 By the time the sheets reached me, I, too, gasped, "Oh! It can't be." They were the same ten questions that I had made up only yesterday! How could that be? One chance in a million, I'm sure. I wrote and wrote and wrote.

16 "Old Kolb" gave me a 100 plus. He wrote a note saying,"Thank goodness for one good scholar in all my years of teaching."But he didn't know what luck I had, and I never told him.

17 Now that twenty years have passed, I think that it is safe to reveal that here is one fellow who got his B.A. by sheer luck.

Word List

B.A abbr (Bachelor of Arts的缩写)(文科)学士

sheer adj. 全然的,纯粹的

Egyptian adj. 埃及的

percentage n. 百分比

frightening adj.令人惊吓的

pace n. 速度

lucky adj. 幸运的

survival n. 幸存,生存;生还

grade n. (考试或作业的)分数

disgraceful adj. 丢脸的,不光彩的

work v. (计划等)进行顺利

imitate v. 模仿,仿效

recite v. 背诵

presentation n. 叙述,陈述

transitional adj. 转变的,转折的;过渡性的

minor adj. 次要的,较小的

topic n. (章节、段落等的)标题;主题

subtopic n. 小标题,副标题;要点

intellectual adj. 智力的,思维力的

inferiority n. 劣等,劣势;低劣

flip v. 迅速地翻(书页等)

textbook 课本,教科书

chapter n. (书等的)章、篇、回

religion n. 宗教信仰

assigned adj. 指定的

jot n. 匆匆记下

point n. (表示事项的)点、条、项

summary n.& adj. 摘要,总结,梗概;概要的,扼要的

issue n. 问题,议题,争论点

master v. 掌握,精通

compose v. 写;作(诗等);作曲

correct v. 改正,纠正,修正

accurately adv.准确地

take (notes) v. 记(笔记)

campus n. (大学或学院的)校园

underestimate v. 低估

hysterical adj. 歇斯底里的,情绪异常激动的

expected adj. 预期的,预料的

plus adj. (学科评分)高于……的

thank goodness interj. 谢天谢地

scholar n. 学生;学者

reveal v. 透露,揭露(事实、秘密等)

Proper Names

Walter Pauk 沃尔特·波克(人名)

Kolb 科尔布(人名)

Pharaoh Hophra 霍夫拉法老

Egypt 埃及(国名)

Jack 杰克(人名)

Useful Expressions

come out (考试等的结果)出来

think over 认真考虑

every other line 每隔一行

fill in 填入

why not …做……不好吗?

convince sb. of sth. 使某人相信某事

work on 从事……,搞……

pick out 选出,挑出

reduce to 降至

read over /through很快把……从头到尾读一遍

go through 把……详细过一遍

refer to 参阅,参考

to one’s delight 让某人高兴的是

without question 毫无疑问

and so forth 等等

jot down (快速)写下来

from memory 凭记忆

pass /give out 分发

by mistake 弄错

make up 编造

(sb.) hit upon an idea 突然有了主意

The girl hit upon a wonderful idea.

as …as possible 尽可能的……

I ran as fast as possible.

now that 既然已…… 现在已经……

Now that you’ve come,why don’t join us in the game.

  

译文

现在可以全盘托出了:我全凭运气获得了学士学位。情况是这样的:

  那一年,科尔布教授要求特别严。他的《埃及史》课有63.6% 的学生不及格。我要

不是交了好运,就会使不及格率上升到65.4%。

  他讲课的速度惊人的快,我对此记忆犹新。任何人记笔记的速度都跟不上“老科尔

布”讲课的速度。每次我都要漏记一大半。没有完整的笔记,学起来很困难。在一次考试

中,我得了38分,已经算是够幸运的了。我知道,要想通过这门课的考试,唯一办法就

是把笔记记得全一些。

  考试成绩出来的当晚,我对自己那很不光彩的分数思来想去。突然,我想到了一个

好办法:记笔记时我为什么不写一行空一行呢?这样课后我就可以回忆起上课的内容,

并把没有记下来的部分补上。

  第二天,我试了试这种办法还真行!真走运!刚开始的时候,回忆上课的内容还有

些困难,但随着时间的推移,这事做起来就比较得心应手了。我常常在宿舍里不看笔

记,模仿教授,尽最大努力把他讲授的内容再讲一遍。

  一天晚上,我在背诵当天的上课内容时,我有了一个重大发现。我尽量把课讲得流

利,这样我就使用了一些转折词语:“我们讨论了霍夫拉法老成功的主要因素之后,现在

我们来看看次要的因素。”就在这时,我停了下来,科尔布教授从来不把他讲课的内容按

一、二、三、四划分要点,更没有再往下分出1、2、3等次要点;实际上,他讲课还是

层次分明,只不过要你自己去挖掘罢了。知道了这个秘密,我发现课上我笔记做得更

好,课下很容易就把遗漏的部分补上。

  有一件事使我最终确信我的智力就是不如别人:我发现我的同学只是一目十行地翻

了翻课本。我真是太笨了,每一章都要花上好几个小时去读。但我也遇上了一件幸运的

事:在图书馆找一本关于埃及宗教的书时,我发现了有一个书架上放满了关于埃及的

书。然后我一直读到晚上10点图书馆关门。最后我选了三本通俗易懂的书带回宿舍。我

发现,先读读这些书,就能更好地理解教材中指定的章节。所以,凭着运气我解决了教

科书的问题。

  到期末考试临近时,我有了两英寸厚的课堂笔记本。那么,我是不是要把笔记都背

下来?把课本也都背下来呢?意识到自己不可能把笔记上所有的内容都背下来时,我便

决定带着一个问题来复习每一节课的内容:“这节课最重要的内容是什么?”我找到答案

后,就把要点写在我称为“摘要篇”的单页纸上。我把要点摘出后,几英寸厚的课堂笔记

就压缩成了12页的“主要问题”。然后我如法炮制,摘出了课本的要点。

  复习这些主要问题,我先读了一遍,然后想一想,最后不看笔记用我自己的话试着

把这些重点背诵一遍。我用同样的方法一个问题一个问题地整理成了自己的摘要篇。

  掌握了这些重点问题后,我就出了十个问题——如果我是教授,我会问的十个问

题。我假想自己是在考场上,用了四个小时回答了这十个问题。当我对照课堂笔记和课

文笔记修改答案时,我非常高兴得发现,我对事实和观点的分析都很准确。这是我第一

次有了成就感。为了好好休息,我没有跟其他的男生一起去看电影,而是十点钟就上床

睡觉了。

  第二天早晨去考场的路上,我碰到了后来坐在我身旁的杰克,不用问我就知道我的

运气全完了。整个学期,他没有记一个字的笔记,甚至连课本都没有翻过。我问他为什

么不紧张时,他回答说:“这学期该用第四号考题。”

  “第四套考题?”

  我想校园里除了我以外,人人都知道“老科尔布”有五套考题(每套十个问题),每

五年之内,他依次用这五套考题。“老科尔布”倒是把考题从学生手里全部收回,可是低

估了学生的组织才能。他们是这样安排的:有些学生分到的任务是背下第一个问题,另

外一些学生背下第二个问题,依次类推。离开考场后,学生立即凭记忆将这些问题记下

来。他们就是这样,最终收集到了这五套考题。

  我知道我的运气全完了。发试卷的时候,我听到了各种各样的唉声叹气:“哎呀,坏

了!”“糟糕!”还有歇斯底里的笑声。我想可能是,科尔布教授误把第五套试卷,当作大

家期盼的第四套试卷发了下来。

  等到考卷发到我的手上时,我也惊讶地喊了出来:“哎呀,怎么会呢?”试题与我昨天

出的十个问题一模一样!怎么会呢?这真是千载难逢。我写呀,写呀,写。

  “老科尔布”给我打了100+ 分。他还写了一条批语:“谢天谢地,在我多年的教学生涯

中,总算出了这么一个高才生!”但他不知道我是多么地幸运,我也从没向他提起。

  二十年过去了,我想透露这个秘密没有什么危险了:有那么一个家伙纯靠运气得到了学士学位
Lesson Twelve:I Got My B.A. by Sheer Luck 1 NOW IT CAN BE TOLD: I got my B.A. by sheer luck. Here is my story. 2 Professor Kolb was especially difficult that year. Exactly 63.6 percent of the class failed Egyptian History. And if it were not for sheer luck, I'd have raised the ercentage to 65.4. 3 I remember most vividly the frightening pace of the lectures. No one could take notes as fast as "Old Kolb" talked. I usually missed more than half of each lecture. Without complete notes, it was impossible to study. I was lucky to have gotten even the 38 in one exam. I knew that my only chance for survival was to get fuller notes. 4 That night after the exam grades came out, I thought over my disgraceful grade. Suddenly I hit upon an idea: Why not leave every other line on my note paper blank? Then I could recall the lecture afterward and fill in the missing parts. 5 The next day I tried this plan and it worked! What luck! At first it was difficult to recall the lecture, but as days passed, it became sort of a game. Often in my room I would imitate the professor and try to give the lecture as best as I could without looking at my notes. 6 One evening while reciting the day's lecture to myself, I made an important discovery. In trying to make my presentation as smooth as possible, I used the transitional words "Now that we have discussed the major reason for the success of Pharaoh Hophra, let us look at the minor reasons." At that moment I stopped still, for at no time did the professor ever cut up the lecture into topics and subtopics; however, the topics and subtopics were there, waiting to be discovered.With this secret in mind, I found that I could take better notes during the lecture,and after class I could very easily supply the missing parts. 7 An incident finally convinced me of my intellectual inferiority when I found that the other students just "flipped the pages" of the textbook. But poor me, I had to work on each chapter for hours. I was lucky when, looking in the library for a book on Egyptian religion, I ran across a whole shelf filled with books on Egypt. I spent the rest of the day until 10∶00 p.m. (closing time) reading. I finally picked out three books which were easy enough for me to understand, and I took these back to my room. By first reading these books, I found I could understand better the assigned chapter in the textbook. So with luck I solved the textbook problem. 8 There I was, as the final examination approached, with a notebook about two inches thick,filled with lecture notes. Now, was I to memorize all these notes? And the textbook? Realizing that I couldn't memorize everything in my notes, I decided to review each lecture with one thought in mind: "What is the really important idea here?" As I found the answer, I'd jot the central point on separate sheets which I called "Summary Sheets." When I finished, I had reduced inches of lecture notes to just twelve pages of "main issues."I then did the same with my textbook . 9 I learned these main issues by first reading them over, thinking about them, then without looking at my notes, by trying to recite them in my own words. I went through my summary sheets in the same way, issue by issue. 10 Having mastered these main issues, I composed ten questions —questions that I'd ask if I were the professor. I pretended that I was in the examination room, and I spent the next four hours answering my ten questions. I then corrected my answers by referring to the lecture and the textbook notes, and much to my delight, I had discussed all the facts and ideas accurately. For the first time I felt that I had achieved something. I went to bed at 10∶00 for a good night's sleep, having refused to go to a movie with the rest of the boys. 11 On the way to the examination room the next morning, I knew without question that my luck had run out when I met Jack, who sat next to me. He had not taken a single note all semester; he had not even "flipped" the textbook pages. When I asked why he wasn't nervous, he answered, "This is the semester for Examination Set #4." 12 "What's Examination Set # 4?" 13 Everybody on campus except me, I guess, knew that "Old Kolb" had five sets of examinations (ten questions in every set),which he used in turn over a five-year period.Though "Old Kolb"collected the question sheets from each student, he underestimated their organizing ability. The plan worked like this: Some students were given the task to memorize question # 1, another group to memorize # 2, and so forth. When the students left the examination room, they jotted down these questions quickly from memory. In this way they finally collected all five sets of the examination. 14 I knew my luck had run out. As the examination sheets were passed out, I heard moans of various kinds: "Oh, No ! No !" and hysterical laughter. I thought that perhaps the professor had by mistake given out Exam # 5 instead of the expected # 4. 15 By the time the sheets reached me, I, too, gasped, "Oh! It can't be." They were the same ten questions that I had made up only yesterday! How could that be? One chance in a million, I'm sure. I wrote and wrote and wrote. 16 "Old Kolb" gave me a 100 plus. He wrote a note saying,"Thank goodness for one good scholar in all my years of teaching."But he didn't know what luck I had, and I never told him. 17 Now that twenty years have passed, I think that it is safe to reveal that here is one fellow who got his B.A. by sheer luck. Word List B.A abbr (Bachelor of Arts的缩写)(文科)学士 sheer adj. 全然的,纯粹的 Egyptian adj. 埃及的 percentage n. 百分比 frightening adj.令人惊吓的 pace n. 速度 lucky adj. 幸运的 survival n. 幸存,生存;生还 grade n. (考试或作业的)分数 disgraceful adj. 丢脸的,不光彩的 work v. (计划等)进行顺利 imitate v. 模仿,仿效 recite v. 背诵 presentation n. 叙述,陈述 transitional adj. 转变的,转折的;过渡性的 minor adj. 次要的,较小的 topic n. (章节、段落等的)标题;主题 subtopic n. 小标题,副标题;要点 intellectual adj. 智力的,思维力的 inferiority n. 劣等,劣势;低劣 flip v. 迅速地翻(书页等) textbook 课本,教科书 chapter n. (书等的)章、篇、回 religion n. 宗教信仰 assigned adj. 指定的 jot n. 匆匆记下 point n. (表示事项的)点、条、项 summary n.& adj. 摘要,总结,梗概;概要的,扼要的 issue n. 问题,议题,争论点 master v. 掌握,精通 compose v. 写;作(诗等);作曲 correct v. 改正,纠正,修正 accurately adv.准确地 take (notes) v. 记(笔记) campus n. (大学或学院的)校园 underestimate v. 低估 hysterical adj. 歇斯底里的,情绪异常激动的 expected adj. 预期的,预料的 plus adj. (学科评分)高于……的 thank goodness interj. 谢天谢地 scholar n. 学生;学者 reveal v. 透露,揭露(事实、秘密等) Proper Names Walter Pauk 沃尔特·波克(人名) Kolb 科尔布(人名) Pharaoh Hophra 霍夫拉法老 Egypt 埃及(国名) Jack 杰克(人名) Useful Expressions come out (考试等的结果)出来 think over 认真考虑 every other line 每隔一行 fill in 填入 why not …做……不好吗? convince sb. of sth. 使某人相信某事 work on 从事……,搞…… pick out 选出,挑出 reduce to 降至 read over /through很快把……从头到尾读一遍 go through 把……详细过一遍 refer to 参阅,参考 to one’s delight 让某人高兴的是 without question 毫无疑问 and so forth 等等 jot down (快速)写下来 from memory 凭记忆 pass /give out 分发 by mistake 弄错 make up 编造 (sb.) hit upon an idea 突然有了主意 The girl hit upon a wonderful idea. as …as possible 尽可能的…… I ran as fast as possible. now that 既然已…… 现在已经…… Now that you’ve come,why don’t join us in the game.    译文 现在可以全盘托出了:我全凭运气获得了学士学位。情况是这样的:   那一年,科尔布教授要求特别严。他的《埃及史》课有63.6% 的学生不及格。我要 不是交了好运,就会使不及格率上升到65.4%。   他讲课的速度惊人的快,我对此记忆犹新。任何人记笔记的速度都跟不上“老科尔 布”讲课的速度。每次我都要漏记一大半。没有完整的笔记,学起来很困难。在一次考试 中,我得了38分,已经算是够幸运的了。我知道,要想通过这门课的考试,唯一办法就 是把笔记记得全一些。   考试成绩出来的当晚,我对自己那很不光彩的分数思来想去。突然,我想到了一个 好办法:记笔记时我为什么不写一行空一行呢?这样课后我就可以回忆起上课的内容, 并把没有记下来的部分补上。   第二天,我试了试这种办法还真行!真走运!刚开始的时候,回忆上课的内容还有 些困难,但随着时间的推移,这事做起来就比较得心应手了。我常常在宿舍里不看笔 记,模仿教授,尽最大努力把他讲授的内容再讲一遍。   一天晚上,我在背诵当天的上课内容时,我有了一个重大发现。我尽量把课讲得流 利,这样我就使用了一些转折词语:“我们讨论了霍夫拉法老成功的主要因素之后,现在 我们来看看次要的因素。”就在这时,我停了下来,科尔布教授从来不把他讲课的内容按 一、二、三、四划分要点,更没有再往下分出1、2、3等次要点;实际上,他讲课还是 层次分明,只不过要你自己去挖掘罢了。知道了这个秘密,我发现课上我笔记做得更 好,课下很容易就把遗漏的部分补上。   有一件事使我最终确信我的智力就是不如别人:我发现我的同学只是一目十行地翻 了翻课本。我真是太笨了,每一章都要花上好几个小时去读。但我也遇上了一件幸运的 事:在图书馆找一本关于埃及宗教的书时,我发现了有一个书架上放满了关于埃及的 书。然后我一直读到晚上10点图书馆关门。最后我选了三本通俗易懂的书带回宿舍。我 发现,先读读这些书,就能更好地理解教材中指定的章节。所以,凭着运气我解决了教 科书的问题。   到期末考试临近时,我有了两英寸厚的课堂笔记本。那么,我是不是要把笔记都背 下来?把课本也都背下来呢?意识到自己不可能把笔记上所有的内容都背下来时,我便 决定带着一个问题来复习每一节课的内容:“这节课最重要的内容是什么?”我找到答案 后,就把要点写在我称为“摘要篇”的单页纸上。我把要点摘出后,几英寸厚的课堂笔记 就压缩成了12页的“主要问题”。然后我如法炮制,摘出了课本的要点。   复习这些主要问题,我先读了一遍,然后想一想,最后不看笔记用我自己的话试着 把这些重点背诵一遍。我用同样的方法一个问题一个问题地整理成了自己的摘要篇。   掌握了这些重点问题后,我就出了十个问题——如果我是教授,我会问的十个问 题。我假想自己是在考场上,用了四个小时回答了这十个问题。当我对照课堂笔记和课 文笔记修改答案时,我非常高兴得发现,我对事实和观点的分析都很准确。这是我第一 次有了成就感。为了好好休息,我没有跟其他的男生一起去看电影,而是十点钟就上床 睡觉了。   第二天早晨去考场的路上,我碰到了后来坐在我身旁的杰克,不用问我就知道我的 运气全完了。整个学期,他没有记一个字的笔记,甚至连课本都没有翻过。我问他为什 么不紧张时,他回答说:“这学期该用第四号考题。”   “第四套考题?”   我想校园里除了我以外,人人都知道“老科尔布”有五套考题(每套十个问题),每 五年之内,他依次用这五套考题。“老科尔布”倒是把考题从学生手里全部收回,可是低 估了学生的组织才能。他们是这样安排的:有些学生分到的任务是背下第一个问题,另 外一些学生背下第二个问题,依次类推。离开考场后,学生立即凭记忆将这些问题记下 来。他们就是这样,最终收集到了这五套考题。   我知道我的运气全完了。发试卷的时候,我听到了各种各样的唉声叹气:“哎呀,坏 了!”“糟糕!”还有歇斯底里的笑声。我想可能是,科尔布教授误把第五套试卷,当作大 家期盼的第四套试卷发了下来。   等到考卷发到我的手上时,我也惊讶地喊了出来:“哎呀,怎么会呢?”试题与我昨天 出的十个问题一模一样!怎么会呢?这真是千载难逢。我写呀,写呀,写。   “老科尔布”给我打了100+ 分。他还写了一条批语:“谢天谢地,在我多年的教学生涯 中,总算出了这么一个高才生!”但他不知道我是多么地幸运,我也从没向他提起。   二十年过去了,我想透露这个秘密没有什么危险了:有那么一个家伙纯靠运气得到了学士学位
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