大学英语六级听力真题07-01月老题型

zhutong012530 2007-12-01 1575 阅读
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1. A) The foggy weather has affected Mary’s mood.

B) They are puzzled about Mary’s low spirits.

C) Mary is dissatisfied with her promotion.

D) Mary cares too much about her looks.

2. A) Go to an art exhibition.

B) Attend the opening night of a play.

C) Dine out with an old friend.

D) See his paintings on display.

3. A) Her mother was quite outstanding in academic word.

B) She was not particularly interested in going to school.

C) Her parents laid great emphasis on academic excellence.

D) She helped upgrade the educational level of immigrants.

4. A) The machines there were ill maintained.

B) Tickets for its members were cheaper.

C) It was filled with people all the time.

D) It had a reputation for good service.

5. A) Both Sarah and Tom have been awarded doctoral degrees.

B) Tom has arranged to meet his bride Sarah in Hawaii.

C) Tom was more excited than Sarah at the wedding.

D) A double blessing has descended upon Tom.

6. A) There were too many questions in the examination.

B) The examination was well beyond the course content.

C) The examination questions were somewhat too difficult.

D) The course prepared him adequately for the examination.

7. A) It’s less time consuming.

B) His wife is tired of cooking.

C) It’s part of his job.

D) He is sick of home-cooked meals.

8. A) He has just started to teach piano lessons.

B) He seldom takes things seriously.

C) He is very proud of his piano skills.

D) He usually understates his achievements.

9. A) It’s tedious.

B) It’s absurd.

C) It’s justifiable.

D) It’s understandable.

10. A) Arrange accommodation for her.

B) Explain the cause of the cancellation.

C) Compensate her for the inconvenience.

D) Allow her to take another flight that night.

Section B

Directions: In this section, you will hear 3 short passages. At the end of each passage, you will hear some questions. Both the passage and the questions will be spoken only once. After you hear a question, you must choose the best answer from the four choices marked A), B), C) or D). Then mark the corresponding letter on the Answer Sheet with a single line through the centre.

Passage One

Questions 11 to 13 are based on the passage you have just heard.

11. A) Producing legendary painting.

B) Making a fortune from decorative arts.

C) Manufacturing quality furniture.

D) Setting up a special museum.

12. A) To show his fascination with Asian culture.

B) To tell the story of the American Revolution.

C) To promote interest in American decorative arts.

D) To increase the popularity of the DuPont Company.



13. A) By theme of period.

B) By style of design.

C) By manufacturer of origin.

D) By function of purpose.



Passage Two

Questions 14 to 16 are based on the passage you have just heard.

14. A) People may use two or more languages.

B) People will choose Chinese rather than English.

C) The percentage of native speakers of English will increase.

D) The number of people relying on their mother tongue will drop.

15. A) The number of Spanish speakers is far greater than that of Arabic speakers.

B) Arabic spoken in one Arab country may not be understood in another.

C) Arabic spoken in Egypt differs from Arabic spoken in Morocco in origin.

D) The number of Arabic speakers is declining because of the invasion of English.

16. A) It is impossible for Arab countries to standardize their language.

B) Most people in the world will learn to speak Chinese in the future.

C) It is uncertain whether English will be the world language in the future.

D) Spanish is very likely to become the top language of the world by 2050.

Passage Three

Questions 17 to 20 are based on the passage you have just heard.

17. A) Because they believe blind students prefer to mix with students who can see.

B) Because it would cost lots of money to build such special colleges.

C) Because it would constitute discrimination against blind students.

D) Because they think blind people should learn to live among sighted people.

18. A) By encouraging the to be more self-reliant.

B) By showing them proper care and respect.

C) By offering them more financial assistance.

D) By providing them with free medical service.

19. A) Financial aid from the American government.

B) Modern technology.

C) Professional support.

D) Help from the National Federation of the Blind.

20. A) Ask American professors to write recommendations on their behalf.

B) Obtain American citizenship before they reach the age of 30.

C) Turn to special institutions in their own country for assistance.

D) Apply to the national federation of the Blind for scholarships.

1. W: Do you know why Mary has such a long face today?

M: I don’t have the foggiest idea! She should be happy especially since she got a promotion yesterday.

Q: What did the speakers mean?

2. M: Hi, Johanna! Are you interested in going to an Art Exhibition on Sunday? A friend of mine is showing some of her paintings there. It’s the opening night. Free drinks and food!

W: Well, actually, I don’t have anything planned. It sounds kind of fun!

Q: What did the man invite the woman to do on Sunday?

3. M: You did an excellent job in school! You were indeed a great student! Where did your drive come from?

W: Academic achievements were important to my parents as immigrants. Education is where it all begins. My mother in particular tries to get me interested in school.

Q: what do we learn about the woman from the conversation?

4. M: I hear the Sunflower Health Club on Third Street is good!

W: Not right now! I used to go there. I thought it was great because it was real cheap. But the problem was it was always crowded. Sometimes, I had to wait to use the machines.

Q: What does the woman say about the Sunflower health club?

5. W: Tom is very excited! Just yesterday he received his doctoral degree and in a few minutes he’ll be putting the ring on Sarah’s finger.

M: He’s really such a luck dog! Sarah is a lovely bride and tonight they are going to Hawaii on their honeymoon!

Q: What do we learn from the conversation?

6. W: Your chemistry examination is over, isn’t it? Why do you still look so worried?

M: I don’t know. It wasn’t that the questions were too hard, or they were too many of them. But I’m still feeling uneasy because the exam didn’t seem to have much to do with the course material.

Q: What does the man mean?

7. W: Your wife told me that you eat out four or five times a week, I really envy you!

M: Don’t envy me! It’s for business. In fact, I’m sick and tired of restaurant food! Sometimes, I just prefer a home-cooked meal.

Q: Why does the man say he often eats out?

8. W: I was amazed when I heard Tony played piano so expertly! From the way he talked, I thought he was just starting his lessons.

M: Oh, no! That’s the way he always talks!

Q: What can we infer about Tony from the conversation?

9. M: What do you think of people suing McDonalds for making them fat?

W: Well. Its food doesn’t make you fat. But eating too much of it does! How about chocolate and ice cream? Are they all responsible? It’s silly!

Q: What does the woman think of the lawsuit against McDonalds?

10. M: I’m terribly sorry ma’am, but your flight has been cancelled. I won’t be able to put you on another one until tomorrow morning.

W: Well, I certainly hope the airline’s going to put me up somewhere tonight.

Q: What did the woman request the airline do?

Passage one

You have probably heard of the DuPont Company, which was founded by a family of the same name. But do you know about the museum that one of the family members began? Henry Francis DuPont was an heir to Delaware’s DuPont Company fortune. He was one of the first serious collectors of American decorative art objects: furniture, textiles, paintings and other objects made in United States between 1640 and 1840. American furniture and household objects had been considered inferior to those from Europe. But DuPont helped developed a new appreciation for American decorative arts. He created a legendary show plays for these objects on his family estate just outside Wilmington, Delaware. In 1951, it was open to the public as the Henry Francis DuPont Winterthur Museum. The museum assembled objects from DuPont’s collection into 175 period rooms, each with examples of American antiques and decorative arts that followed a certain theme of period in early American history. For example, the DuPont dining room has furniture dating from the late 18th and early 19th centuries. And because this was the time when the United States became a new nation, there’s a patriotic theme in the room. Another example is the Chinese parlor, which has furnishings that would reflect American’s fascination with Asian culture during the 18th century. In these period rooms, DuPont believed he could tell the story of the early United States through furniture and other decorative arts.

Questions 11 to 13 are based on the passage you have just heard.

11. What is Henry Francis DuPont noted for?

12. What was the purpose of DuPont’s efforts?

13. How were the objects on display arranged?

Passage Two

According to David Grattle, a British language expert, the idea that English will become the world language is outdated. And people are more likely to switch between two or more languages for routine communication in the future. The share of the world’s population that speaks English as a native language is falling. Instead, English will play a growing role as a second language. A population speaking more than one language is already the case in much of the world and is becoming more common in the United States. Indeed, the census bureau reported last year that nearly one American in five speaks a language other than English at home, with Spanish taking the lead, followed by Chinese. Grattle works for British consulting and publishing business. He anticipates a world with the share of people who are native English speakers slips from 9% in the mid 1990s to 5% in 2050. Grattle says, “Up until 1995, English was the second most common native tongue in the world, trailing only Chinese. By 2050, Chinese will continue its predominance with Hindi Woodoo of India and Arabic climbing past English and Spanish nearly equal to it.” In contrast, an American language expert, David Harrison noted that the global share of English is much larger if you count second language speakers, and will continue to rise even as the proportion of native speakers declines. Harrison disputed listing Arabic in top three languages because varieties of Arabic spoken in such countries as Egypt and Morocco are mutually incomprehensible.

Questions 14 to 16 are based on the passage you have just heard.

14. What does David Grattle say about the use of languages for daily communication in the future?

15. Why doesn’t David Harrison include Arabic as one of the top three languages?

16. What can we infer from the passage?

Passage Three

There are about 1 million blind people in the United States. The largest and most influential organization of blind people in this country is the National Federation of the Blind. Its officials say the nation doesn’t have any colleges or universities that serve only blind students. They say the reason for this is that blind people must learn to live among people who can see. American colleges and universities do accept blind and visually impaired students, and they provide services to help these students succeed. For example, colleges find people who write down what the professor say in class and they provide technology that can help blind students with their work. However, experts say colleges can best help blind students by making it clear that the students should learn to help themselves. One blind American student named T recently made news because he graduated from medical school from the University of Wisconsin. He said technology was one of the reasons he succeeded. He used a computer that read into his earphone what he was typing. He also used a small printer that permitted him to write notes about his patients in the hospital. He did his undergraduate work at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana. National Federation of the Blind officials say blind students from other nations do come to the United States to attend college. Some can even get financial aid. The Federation awards about 30 scholarships each year that have no citizenship requirement.

Questions 17 to 20 are based on the passage you have just heard.

17. According to officials of the National Federation of the Blind, why are there no special colleges for blind students only?

18. According to experts how can colleges best help blind students?

19. What is one of the reasons given by T as a blind student for his success?

20. What can blind students from overseas do to study in America according to the National Federation of the Blind?
1. A) The foggy weather has affected Mary’s mood. B) They are puzzled about Mary’s low spirits. C) Mary is dissatisfied with her promotion. D) Mary cares too much about her looks. 2. A) Go to an art exhibition. B) Attend the opening night of a play. C) Dine out with an old friend. D) See his paintings on display. 3. A) Her mother was quite outstanding in academic word. B) She was not particularly interested in going to school. C) Her parents laid great emphasis on academic excellence. D) She helped upgrade the educational level of immigrants. 4. A) The machines there were ill maintained. B) Tickets for its members were cheaper. C) It was filled with people all the time. D) It had a reputation for good service. 5. A) Both Sarah and Tom have been awarded doctoral degrees. B) Tom has arranged to meet his bride Sarah in Hawaii. C) Tom was more excited than Sarah at the wedding. D) A double blessing has descended upon Tom. 6. A) There were too many questions in the examination. B) The examination was well beyond the course content. C) The examination questions were somewhat too difficult. D) The course prepared him adequately for the examination. 7. A) It’s less time consuming. B) His wife is tired of cooking. C) It’s part of his job. D) He is sick of home-cooked meals. 8. A) He has just started to teach piano lessons. B) He seldom takes things seriously. C) He is very proud of his piano skills. D) He usually understates his achievements. 9. A) It’s tedious. B) It’s absurd. C) It’s justifiable. D) It’s understandable. 10. A) Arrange accommodation for her. B) Explain the cause of the cancellation. C) Compensate her for the inconvenience. D) Allow her to take another flight that night. Section B Directions: In this section, you will hear 3 short passages. At the end of each passage, you will hear some questions. Both the passage and the questions will be spoken only once. After you hear a question, you must choose the best answer from the four choices marked A), B), C) or D). Then mark the corresponding letter on the Answer Sheet with a single line through the centre. Passage One Questions 11 to 13 are based on the passage you have just heard. 11. A) Producing legendary painting. B) Making a fortune from decorative arts. C) Manufacturing quality furniture. D) Setting up a special museum. 12. A) To show his fascination with Asian culture. B) To tell the story of the American Revolution. C) To promote interest in American decorative arts. D) To increase the popularity of the DuPont Company. 13. A) By theme of period. B) By style of design. C) By manufacturer of origin. D) By function of purpose. Passage Two Questions 14 to 16 are based on the passage you have just heard. 14. A) People may use two or more languages. B) People will choose Chinese rather than English. C) The percentage of native speakers of English will increase. D) The number of people relying on their mother tongue will drop. 15. A) The number of Spanish speakers is far greater than that of Arabic speakers. B) Arabic spoken in one Arab country may not be understood in another. C) Arabic spoken in Egypt differs from Arabic spoken in Morocco in origin. D) The number of Arabic speakers is declining because of the invasion of English. 16. A) It is impossible for Arab countries to standardize their language. B) Most people in the world will learn to speak Chinese in the future. C) It is uncertain whether English will be the world language in the future. D) Spanish is very likely to become the top language of the world by 2050. Passage Three Questions 17 to 20 are based on the passage you have just heard. 17. A) Because they believe blind students prefer to mix with students who can see. B) Because it would cost lots of money to build such special colleges. C) Because it would constitute discrimination against blind students. D) Because they think blind people should learn to live among sighted people. 18. A) By encouraging the to be more self-reliant. B) By showing them proper care and respect. C) By offering them more financial assistance. D) By providing them with free medical service. 19. A) Financial aid from the American government. B) Modern technology. C) Professional support. D) Help from the National Federation of the Blind. 20. A) Ask American professors to write recommendations on their behalf. B) Obtain American citizenship before they reach the age of 30. C) Turn to special institutions in their own country for assistance. D) Apply to the national federation of the Blind for scholarships. 1. W: Do you know why Mary has such a long face today? M: I don’t have the foggiest idea! She should be happy especially since she got a promotion yesterday. Q: What did the speakers mean? 2. M: Hi, Johanna! Are you interested in going to an Art Exhibition on Sunday? A friend of mine is showing some of her paintings there. It’s the opening night. Free drinks and food! W: Well, actually, I don’t have anything planned. It sounds kind of fun! Q: What did the man invite the woman to do on Sunday? 3. M: You did an excellent job in school! You were indeed a great student! Where did your drive come from? W: Academic achievements were important to my parents as immigrants. Education is where it all begins. My mother in particular tries to get me interested in school. Q: what do we learn about the woman from the conversation? 4. M: I hear the Sunflower Health Club on Third Street is good! W: Not right now! I used to go there. I thought it was great because it was real cheap. But the problem was it was always crowded. Sometimes, I had to wait to use the machines. Q: What does the woman say about the Sunflower health club? 5. W: Tom is very excited! Just yesterday he received his doctoral degree and in a few minutes he’ll be putting the ring on Sarah’s finger. M: He’s really such a luck dog! Sarah is a lovely bride and tonight they are going to Hawaii on their honeymoon! Q: What do we learn from the conversation? 6. W: Your chemistry examination is over, isn’t it? Why do you still look so worried? M: I don’t know. It wasn’t that the questions were too hard, or they were too many of them. But I’m still feeling uneasy because the exam didn’t seem to have much to do with the course material. Q: What does the man mean? 7. W: Your wife told me that you eat out four or five times a week, I really envy you! M: Don’t envy me! It’s for business. In fact, I’m sick and tired of restaurant food! Sometimes, I just prefer a home-cooked meal. Q: Why does the man say he often eats out? 8. W: I was amazed when I heard Tony played piano so expertly! From the way he talked, I thought he was just starting his lessons. M: Oh, no! That’s the way he always talks! Q: What can we infer about Tony from the conversation? 9. M: What do you think of people suing McDonalds for making them fat? W: Well. Its food doesn’t make you fat. But eating too much of it does! How about chocolate and ice cream? Are they all responsible? It’s silly! Q: What does the woman think of the lawsuit against McDonalds? 10. M: I’m terribly sorry ma’am, but your flight has been cancelled. I won’t be able to put you on another one until tomorrow morning. W: Well, I certainly hope the airline’s going to put me up somewhere tonight. Q: What did the woman request the airline do? Passage one You have probably heard of the DuPont Company, which was founded by a family of the same name. But do you know about the museum that one of the family members began? Henry Francis DuPont was an heir to Delaware’s DuPont Company fortune. He was one of the first serious collectors of American decorative art objects: furniture, textiles, paintings and other objects made in United States between 1640 and 1840. American furniture and household objects had been considered inferior to those from Europe. But DuPont helped developed a new appreciation for American decorative arts. He created a legendary show plays for these objects on his family estate just outside Wilmington, Delaware. In 1951, it was open to the public as the Henry Francis DuPont Winterthur Museum. The museum assembled objects from DuPont’s collection into 175 period rooms, each with examples of American antiques and decorative arts that followed a certain theme of period in early American history. For example, the DuPont dining room has furniture dating from the late 18th and early 19th centuries. And because this was the time when the United States became a new nation, there’s a patriotic theme in the room. Another example is the Chinese parlor, which has furnishings that would reflect American’s fascination with Asian culture during the 18th century. In these period rooms, DuPont believed he could tell the story of the early United States through furniture and other decorative arts. Questions 11 to 13 are based on the passage you have just heard. 11. What is Henry Francis DuPont noted for? 12. What was the purpose of DuPont’s efforts? 13. How were the objects on display arranged? Passage Two According to David Grattle, a British language expert, the idea that English will become the world language is outdated. And people are more likely to switch between two or more languages for routine communication in the future. The share of the world’s population that speaks English as a native language is falling. Instead, English will play a growing role as a second language. A population speaking more than one language is already the case in much of the world and is becoming more common in the United States. Indeed, the census bureau reported last year that nearly one American in five speaks a language other than English at home, with Spanish taking the lead, followed by Chinese. Grattle works for British consulting and publishing business. He anticipates a world with the share of people who are native English speakers slips from 9% in the mid 1990s to 5% in 2050. Grattle says, “Up until 1995, English was the second most common native tongue in the world, trailing only Chinese. By 2050, Chinese will continue its predominance with Hindi Woodoo of India and Arabic climbing past English and Spanish nearly equal to it.” In contrast, an American language expert, David Harrison noted that the global share of English is much larger if you count second language speakers, and will continue to rise even as the proportion of native speakers declines. Harrison disputed listing Arabic in top three languages because varieties of Arabic spoken in such countries as Egypt and Morocco are mutually incomprehensible. Questions 14 to 16 are based on the passage you have just heard. 14. What does David Grattle say about the use of languages for daily communication in the future? 15. Why doesn’t David Harrison include Arabic as one of the top three languages? 16. What can we infer from the passage? Passage Three There are about 1 million blind people in the United States. The largest and most influential organization of blind people in this country is the National Federation of the Blind. Its officials say the nation doesn’t have any colleges or universities that serve only blind students. They say the reason for this is that blind people must learn to live among people who can see. American colleges and universities do accept blind and visually impaired students, and they provide services to help these students succeed. For example, colleges find people who write down what the professor say in class and they provide technology that can help blind students with their work. However, experts say colleges can best help blind students by making it clear that the students should learn to help themselves. One blind American student named T recently made news because he graduated from medical school from the University of Wisconsin. He said technology was one of the reasons he succeeded. He used a computer that read into his earphone what he was typing. He also used a small printer that permitted him to write notes about his patients in the hospital. He did his undergraduate work at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana. National Federation of the Blind officials say blind students from other nations do come to the United States to attend college. Some can even get financial aid. The Federation awards about 30 scholarships each year that have no citizenship requirement. Questions 17 to 20 are based on the passage you have just heard. 17. According to officials of the National Federation of the Blind, why are there no special colleges for blind students only? 18. According to experts how can colleges best help blind students? 19. What is one of the reasons given by T as a blind student for his success? 20. What can blind students from overseas do to study in America according to the National Federation of the Blind?
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