自考综合英语一 A

樱花草 2006-11-17 8534 阅读
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Lesson One The Time Message

word list (单词表)
message n. 要旨,要点
tricky adj. (工作、问题等)微妙的,棘手的;(人)狡猾的
beginning n. 开始;起初
semester n. (尤指美国大专院校的)学期
cover v. 处理
duty n. 任务
management n. 管理
number one adj. 最重要的;头号的
seriously adv. 真心地,当真地;认真地,严肃地
once conj. 一旦……(就……)
weekly adj. 每周一次的
follow v. 遵照;沿用
following adj. 紧接着的
realistic adj. 现实可行的
essay n. 作文;短文
quiz n. 考查;测验
upset v. 打乱(计划等);打翻
ability n. 能力;才智
grade n. (考试或作业的)分数
achieve v. 获得
flexible adj. 灵活的
re-plan v. 重新计划
basis n. 基础;根据
project n. 课题;科研项目
mid-term adj. 期中的
solid adj. 扎实的
schedule n. 计划表
alive adj. 起作用的;现存的;活着的
assignment n. (指定的)作业
activity n. 活动
social adj. 社交的;交谊的
seem v. 似乎;好像
back adj. 以前的;过去的
proper names
elwood n. chapman 埃尔伍德•n•查普曼(人名)

Useful Expressions(常用短语)
look ahead 看前面;考虑未来
at the beginning of 在……的开始
plenty of 大量的
have time on one's hands 有许多时间
towards the end of… 即将结束时
work for 为……效力
work against 对……不利
get the most out of sth. 充分利用……的机会
put… into practice 付诸实践
allow for 考虑到
at least 至少
in… case 在…… 情况下
on a weekly /daily basis 每周/每天
work out 制定出
seem to be 看来,好像
keep sth./sb. + adj. 使 ……保持某种状况
run out (of ) (被)用完,将尽  
time is running out.
i have run out of money.
take… some time to do… 花…… 时间做… …   
it will take us an hour to get there.
depend on 取决于,随……而定  
it depends on how many people are going
so that 以便(用来引出目的状语从句)  
tell me your telephone number so that i can call you when i have time.
catch up on  赶上,补上 
i have to catch up on my sleep. i didn't sleep much last night.
text

Time is tricky. It is difficult to control and easy to waste. When you look a head, you think you have more time than you need. For Example, at the beginning of a semester, you may feel that you have plenty of time on your hands, but toward the end of the term you may suddenly find that time is running out. You don't have enough time to cover all your duties (duty), so you get worried. What is the answer? Control!

Time is dangerous. If you don't control it, it will control you. If you don't make it work for you, it will work against you. So you must become the master of time, not its servant. As a first-year college student, time management will be your number one Problem.

Time is valuable. Wasting time is a bad habit. It is like a drug. The most time you waste, the easier it is to go on wasting time. If seriously wish to get the most out of college, you must put the time message into practice.

Message1. Control time from the beginning.

Time is today, not tomorrow of next week. Start your plan at the Beginning of the term.
Message2. Get the notebook habit.
Go and buy a notebook today, Use it to plan your study time each Day. Once a weekly study plan is prepared, follow the same pattern every week with small changes. Sunday is a good day to make the Plan for the following week.

Message3. Be realistic.
Often you know form experience how long it takes you to write a short essay, to study for a quiz, or to review for a final exam. When you plan time for these things, be realistic. Allow for unexpected things. Otherwise you entire plan may be upset.

Message4. Plan at least one hour for each hour in class.
How much study time you plan for each classroom hour depends on four things: (1) you ability, (2) the difficulty of the class, (3) the grades you hope to achieve, and (4) how well you use your study time. One thing, however, is Certain; you should plan at least one hour of study for each classroom hour, in many cases, two or three hours will be required.

Message5. Keep you plan flexible.
It is important that you re-plan your time on a weekly basis so that you can make certain changes when necessary. For example, before mid-term or final exams, you will want to give more time to reviewing. A good plan must be a little flexible so that special projects can be done well.

Message6. Study for sometime each class day.
Some solid work each day is better than many study hours one day and nothing the next. When you work out your schedule, try to include at least two study hours each day. This will not only keep the study habit alive but also keep you up to date on your class assignments.

Message7. Free on Saturday-study on Sunday.
It is good to stop all study activities for one full day. Many students choose Saturday for sports or social activities. Sunday, one the other hand, seems to the best study day for many students. It is a good day to catch up on back reading and other assignments.

Lesson Two
Hans Christian Andersen’s own fairy tale (1)

word list(单词表)

fairy tale n. 童话,神话
fairy n. 小仙子,小精灵
shoemaker n. 鞋匠
shoemaking n. 制鞋,补鞋
prince n.王子
princess n. 公主
poetry n.诗(总称)
act v.表演
royal adj.王室的,皇家的
sensible adj.(建议、主意等)合情合理的,明智的;(人)明智的,明白事理的
stepfather n.继父
weaving n. 编织
weaver n.织布工
unhappiness n.不幸福,不愉快
tragedy n.悲剧,悲惨的事
dancer n.舞蹈演员
genius n.天才;创造力
warm v.(使……)变暖,暖和
for conj. 因为,由于
frost n.霜
woman-like adj.女人似的
figure n.身影,人影
writer n.作家,作者
helping adj.帮助的
finally adv.最后,最终
beautiful美妙动听的
high高音调的,尖声的
break(男孩的嗓音)青春期时变低沉
proper names(专有名词)

Donald peattie唐纳德•皮蒂
louise peattie 路易丝•皮蒂
hans christian anderson汉斯•克里斯琴•安徒生
denmark丹麦
odense欧登塞(地名)
copenhagen哥本哈根(地名)

useful expressions(常用短语)

once upon a time很久以前
ask a favour of sb. 请某人帮忙
look at看着
believe in 相信,信任
work hard at在……上下功夫
pay for sth.支付……的费用
be afraid to do sth. 害怕做某事
change/turn …into…把……改变成……
arrive in /at到达
for ever永远
from time to time不时的,常常
lend a helping hand to sb.帮某人一把
pretend to do sth.假装做某事
not… at all根本不,一点儿也不
he doesn’t know the meaning at all .
start out出发,动身
they started out to look for the lost boy.
we started out at 7 o’clock
add sth. to sth.加上
please add your name to the list.
out of sight从视线中消失(变得看不见)
the ship was soon out of sight
out of sight, out of mind.(谚语:不见就忘。)
because of由于
we didn’t go to the cinema because of the rain.

Text
Once upon a time there was a poor boy who live in Denmark. His father, a shoemaker, had died, and his mother had married again

One day the boy went to ask a favor of the prince of Denmark. When the prince asked him what he wanted, the boy said.” I want to write plays in poetry and to act at the royal theater.” The prince looked at the boy, at his big hands and feet, at his big nose and large serious eyes, and gave a sensible answer. “It is one thing to act in plays, another to write them. I tell you this for your own good; learn a useful trade like shoemaking.”
So the boy, who was not sensible at all, went home. There he took what little money he had, said good-bye to his mother and his stepfather and started out to seek his fortune. He was sure that some day the name Hans Christian Andersen would be known all over Denmark

To believe such a story one would have to believe in fairy tales! Hans Christian knew many such tales. He had heard some of them from his father, who had worked hard at his trade, but liked to read better than to make shoes. In the evenings, he had read aloud form the Arabian nights. His wife understood very little of the book, but the boy, pretending to sleep, understood every word.

By day Hans Christian went to a house where old women worked as weavers. There he listened to the tales that the women told as they worked at their weaving. In those days, there were almost as many tales in Denmark as there were people to tell them.
Among the tales told in the town of Odense, where Andersen was both in 1805 was one about a fairy who brought death to those who danced with her. To this tale, Hans Christian later added a story from his own life.

Once, when his father was still alive, a young lady ordered a pair of red shoes. When she refused to pay for them, unhappiness filled the poor shoemaker’s house from that small tragedy and the story of the dancing fairy, the shoemaker’s son years later wrote the story of the dancing fairy, the shoemaker’s son years later wrote the story that millions of people now know as the red shoes. The genius of Andersen is that he put so much of everyday life into the wonder of his fairy tales.

When Hans Christian’s mother was a little girl, she was sent out on the streets to beg. She did not want to beg , so she sat out of sight under one of the city bridges. She warmed her cold feet in her hands, for she had no shoes. She was afraid to go home. Years latter, her son, in his pity for her and his anger at the world, wrote the angry story she’s no good and the famous tale the little match girl.

Through his genius, he changed every early experience, even his father’s death, into a fairy tale. One cold day the boy had stood looking at the white patterns formed on the window by the frost. His father showed him a white, woman-like figure among the frost patterns. “That is the snow queen,” said the shoemaker. “soon she will be coming for me.” A few months later he was dead. And years later, Andersen turned that sad experience into a fairy tale, the snow queen.
After the prince told him to learn a trade, Hans Christian went to Copenhagen. He was just fourteen years old at the time.

When he arrived in the city, he went to see as many important people as he could find ?dancers, writers and theater people of Copenhagen. But none of them lent a helping hand to the boy with the big hands, the big feet and the big nose. Finally, he had just seven pennies left.

The boy had a beautiful high, clear voice. One day a music teacher heard him singing and decided to help him. He collected money from his fiends and gave it to the boy so that he could boy food and clothing while he studied singing.

Hans Christian was happier than he had ever been in his life. But soon his boy’s voice broke. The beautiful high voice was gone forever.

The boy soon found new friends who admired his genius. there was even a princess who gave him a little money from time to time for food and clothes. But Hans Christian bought little food and no clothes. Instead, he bought books and went to the theater.

lesson Three Hans Christian Andersen’s own fairy tale(II)

word list(单词表)
attic n.阁楼,顶楼
view n.(从特定处看到的)景色
fund n.资金,现款
vividly adv.生动地
march v. 行进,行军
gallop v.(指马等或骑者)飞奔,奔驰
papercut n.剪纸
publish v.出版(书籍、期刊等)
humor,humor n.(美/英)幽默
deeply adv.深刻地
heart n.实质,感情
emperor n.皇帝
kind-hearted adj.好心的,仁慈的
unhappy adj.不幸福的,不愉快的
happily adv. 幸福地,愉快地
comfort v.安慰(某人)
awkward adj.(动作或形态)难看的;笨拙的
figure n.形态,体形
court n.宫廷
day n.时代
duck-yard n.鸭圈
swan n.天鹅
celebration n.庆祝
prince n.(某领域中的)优秀或杰出人物
full adj.丰富的

proper names(专有名词)
jonas collin乔纳斯•科林(人名)
europe欧洲
dickens(人名)
victor hugo维克托•雨果(人名)
useful expressions(常用短语)
have a good view of清楚看到
make friends with sb.与某人交朋友
send sb.to school供某人上学
be full of充满
laugh at嘲笑
feel/be at ease with sb.与某人相处感到轻松惬意
ask for sth.请求或要求某物
translate…into…把……翻译成……
at last最后,终于
in turn轮流,依次
the president shook hands in turn with the people greeting him.
come out出版
when will this book come out ?
so…that如此……以至于
she is so fat that she can't move easily.
look upon …as把……看做……
i looked upon you as a close friend.
john is looked upon as the best basketball player in his class.
be in sb.'s /sth.'s honour;be in honour of sb./sth. 向……表示敬意;
为庆祝……;为纪 念
a party will be held in honour of the visiting president.

Text
In Copenhagen, Hans Christian lived in an attic in an old house, where he had a good view of the city. But there was one big fact that he could not see right under his own nose. The plays and poetry that he wrote were not very good.

Hans Christian made friends with a few kind people. Among them was Jonas Collin of the Royal Theater. This kind man collected funds from friends to send the young writer to school. Hans felt most at ease with children. He ate his dinner in turn at the homes of six friends. In each home the children begged him for stories
.
Hans told a tale so vividly that you could see and hear toy soldiers marching and toy horse galloping. And he could make the most wonderful papercuts. These are kept today in the Andersen Museum, which is in the house where he was born in Odense.

Andersen remained single all his life. The good Collin family-three generations of them-became all the family he was ever to have. They all loved him, but they advised him not to write any more poetry and plays, and to try to get a government job. They talked as he later made the animals talk in his stories:” I tell you this for your own good,” said the Han to the Ugly Duckling,” you should learn to lay eggs like me.” In The Ugly Duckling Hans Christian told the story of his own life.

When his first book of fairy tales was published in 1835, Andersen didn’t think it would be successful, but children read the stories and wanted more. So, encouraged by their interest, he began what we know today as his great work, for 37 year, a new book of Andersen’s fairy tales come out each Christmas. The books were full of everyday truth, of wonder, of sad beauty, of humor. Children an their parents had never read such tales before.

Andersen’s tales ate a poet’s way of telling us the truth about our selves. He looked deeply into the heart of things. Even in a child’s toy lost in the street, he could see some story with the light of gold in it. All of us laugh at the humor of The Emperor’s New Cloths, but we remember the story every time men pretend to be something that they are not.

Although he was now famous, he was more kind-hearted that ever. One day on the street he met a man who had once treated him badly. The old and unhappy man said that he was sorry for what he had done. Andersen forgave the man and comforted him. The prince who had told Andersen to learn a useful trade was now the King. He invited the writer to his palace and told him that he might ask for nay favor. Andersen replied simply,” But I don’t need anything at all.”

He was already loved all over the world. The awkward figure and kind ugly face had become so famous that his friends, the children, recognized him wherever he was. His wherever he was. His books were translated into many different languages and read all over the world. He was received at the royal courts of Europe and admired by many kings.

The greatest writers of the day, form dickens to Victor Hugo, looked upon him as one of themselves. Among them, he at last learned happily that “it doesn’t matter if you are born in a duck-yard, as long as you come from a swan’s egg”

Happiest of all was the day he returned to the “suck-yard,” nearly 50 years after he had left it. All Odense took part in the great tales. A great dinner was held in his honor. That night, hundreds of people came to his window and celled to him.

What was then in his full heart-that gentle heart that had been lonely for so long-was best expressed in his own words:” To God and man, my thanks, my love.”

Lesson Four This Life

Word List(单词表)
script n.(戏剧、电影等)剧本,脚本
part n. (戏剧、电影等角色的)台词
look n.样子,表情
no adj.完全不是,绝不是
dishwasher n.洗碟工;洗碗机
heavy adj.繁重的;费力的
p.m. abbr.(post meridiem的缩写)下午,午后
Jewish adj.犹太族的
syllable n.音节
context n.上下文
armed adj.具备……知识或技能的;有……装备的
reread v.重读,再读
enormous adj.巨大的,极大的
contribution n.贡献

Proper Names(专有名词)
Sidney Poitier 悉尼•波蒂埃(人名)
John 约翰(人名)
Astoria,Long Island 长岛的阿斯托里亚(地名)

Useful Expressions

(常用短语)
see sb. doing sth.看见某人正在做某事
stare at 盯着
get off从……下来,下车
say to oneself 自言自语
be able to do能够做
think about sth.考虑某事
spend…time(in)doing花……时间做某事
make sb. do sth.让某人做某事
clear away清除
run across/into sb./sth.偶然碰到
a couple of几个
make a contribution to为……做出贡献
take sth. away (with sb.)带走
look for寻找
go over认真学习
begin to do sth.开始做某事
used to do sth.过去常常做某事
He used to go for a walk in the park when he was young.
get/have an idea (of)知道,懂得
I have no idea what I should do.
I’m sorry,I have no idea of that.



Text
It is the first time I have ever been on a stage-I don’t even know what a stage looks like ?but I’m up there now and I open this” script,” but I don’t know what it is. The director tells me to read the part of “John.” Everywhere I see “John” I must read everything under that.

Then I see him sitting in a front seat staring at me with the strangest look. He says. “Get off the stage” I say, “What do you mean?” He says, “Just come on down off that stage and stop wasting my time. You’re no actor. You don’t even know how to read.”

I leave and walk off down 135th Street saying to my self,”You can hardly read. You can’t be an actor and you’re not able to read.” I begin to think about what he’s said to me. Now I Know I can’t read too well. Here I am eighteen years of age, and if I live to be eighty, for the next sixty-two years I’m going to be a dishwasher. I’m not going to be able to make people notice me.

During the next six month, I spent as much times possible reading. One of the restaurants I worked in during that period was in Astoria, long Island. The work was hard and heavy, but we would have most the dishes cleared away by 11:00 or 11:15 p.m. It was my custom to sit out near the kitchen door and read the newspaper.

At the waiters ’table there was a old Jewish man who used to watch me trying go read that paper. I asked him one night what a word meant and he told me. I thanked him and went back to my paper. He went on watching me for a few seconds and then said “do you run across a lot of words you don’t understand?” I said “A lot-because I’m just beginning to learn to read well,” and he said, “I’ll sit with you here and work with you for a while.”

So at about eleven every night when he sat sown for his meal, I would come out of the kitchen and sit down next to him and read articles from the front page of the paper. When I ran into a word I didn’t know (and I didn’t know half of article, become any word longer than a couple of syllables gave me trouble) he explained the meaning of the word and gave me the pronunciation. Then he’d send me back to the sentence so I could understand the word in context.

Then I would take the paper away with me, armed now with the meaning of those words, and reread and reread the article so that the meaning of those words would get locked into my memory. Every evening we did that.
I stayed there at that job for about five or six weeks and learned from him a way to study, and then I went off to other jobs. I have never been able to thank him properly because I never knew then what an enormous contribution he was making to my life. He was wonderful, and a little bit of him is in everything I do.

After that, I always looked for the meaning of words, and when I ran into words I couldn’t pronounce and didn’t understand, I would work on them until I began to understand. I would keep going over and over the sentence they were in, and after a while I would begin to get an idea of what the word meant just by repeating the sentence. That became a habit, as did all the other things he left me with.

Lesson Five Night Watch

word list 单词表

watch n.看护,守候(病人)
elderly adj. 年长的
collapse v. (因病,累等)晕倒
ambulance n. 救护车
rush v. 急速将……送往
repeatedly adv. 一再,反复地
wear v.磨损
emergency-room n. 急诊室
marine n. (美国海军陆战队)士兵或军官
station v.驻扎
station n.值班处
corps n.特种部队,兵团
jeep n.越野车,吉普车
wade v涉水而行
marsh n.沼泽地,湿地
military adj.军事的
enable v.使(人)能够……
reach v.到达……(某人)处,抵达(某地)
lobby n.(旅馆、剧院、医院等的)大厅
serviceman n.军人
bedside n.病床边,床边
weak adj.虚弱的,软弱的
dimly adv.模糊地,蒙?地
oxygen n.氧气
tent n.(氧气)罩
wrap v. 裹……包……
limp adj.没劲的,无力的,没精神的
squeeze v.紧握;挤
encouragement n.鼓励
dimly-lit adj.光线暗淡的
ward n.病房
occasionally adv.偶然地,不时
clanking n.发出叮当声
tank n.(盛液体或气体的)箱,罐或桶
laughter n.笑声
night-staff n.夜班工作人员
exchange v.交换
moan n.呻吟声
snore n.鼾声,呼噜声
tightly adv.紧紧地
lifeless adj.无生命的,死的
sympathy n.同情
startle v.使……惊讶
base n.(军队等)基地,大本营
inform v.通知,告诉
funeral n.葬礼
personnel n.人事部,人员
human adj.有人情的,好心肠的
fellow n.(在名词前)身份相同的
proper names 专有名词
Roy popkin 罗伊•波普金(人名)
Brooklyn布 鲁克林区(美国纽约市行政区名)
north Carolina(美国)北卡罗来纳州

useful expressions 常用短语

rush sb. to… 快速送某人去……
in time及时
enable sb. to do sth.使得某人能做某事
take…to…带……去……
reach out one’s hand伸出某人的手
all through the night整个夜晚
pay attention to sth.注意
now and then偶尔,不时
hold (tightly) to sth.紧抓住
return to…回到……
on one’s way to…在去……的路上
come on醒过来,苏醒
the patient came to three hours after the operation.
too …to do…如此……以至于不能……
she is too young to go to school.
turn out that/to (be/do)原来是,到头来
it turned out that the man who called me this morning was my old classmate.
the man who called me this morning turned out to be my old classmate.
happen to发生于……身上
she is so thin and weak. What has happened to her?

Text
The story began an a downtown Brooklyn street corner An elderly man had collapsed while crossing the street, and an ambulance rushed him to Kings County Hospital. There, when he came to now and again, the man repeatedly called for his son.

From worn letter found in his pocket, an emergency-room nurse learned that his son was a Marine stationed in North Carolina. It seemed there were no other relatives.

Someone at the hospital called the red cross office in Brooklyn, and a request for the boy to rush to Brooklyn was sent to the red cross director of the north Carolina marine corps camp. Because time was short-the patient was dying-the red cross man and officer set out in a jeep. They found the young man wading through some marshes in a military exercise. He was rushed to the airport in time to catch the one plane that might enable him to reach him to reach his father.

It was mid-evening when the young Marine walked into the entrance lobby of Kings county Hospital. A nurse took the tired, anxious serviceman to the bedside.
“Your son is here,” she said to the old man. She had to repeat the words several times before the patient’s opened. The medicine he had been given because of the pain from his heart attack made his eyes weak and he only dimly saw the young man in Marine Corps uniform standing outside the oxygen tent. He reached out his hand. The Marine wrapped his strong fingers around the old man’s limp ones, squeezing a message of love and encouragement. The nurse brought a chair, so the marine could sit by the bed.
Nights are long on hospitals, but all through the Marine the night the young Marine sat there in the dimly-lit ward, holding the old man’s hand and offering words of hope and strength. Occasionally, the nurse suggested that the Marine rest for a while. He refused.
Whenever the nurse came into the ward, the Marine was there, but he paid no attention to her and the night noises of the hospital-the clanking of an oxygen tank, the laughter of night-staff members exchanging greetings, the cries and moans and snores of other patients. Now and then she heard him say a few gentle words. The dying man said nothing, only held tightly to his son through most of the night.
It was nearly dawn when the patient died. The Marine placed on the bed the lifeless hand he had been holding, and went to tell the nurse. While she did what she had to do, he smoked a cigarette-his fist since he got to the hospital.
Finally, she returned to the nurse’s station. Where he was waiting. She started to offer words of sympathy, but the Marine interrupted her. “Who was that man?” he asked.
“He was you father” she answered, startled.
“No, he wasn’t,” the Marine replied. “I never saw him before in my life.”
“Why didn’t you say something when I took you to him?” the nurse asked.
“I knew immediately there’d been a mistake, but I also knew he needed his son, and his son just wasn’t here. When I realized he was too sick to tell whether or not I was his son, I guessed he really needed mo. So I stayed.”
With that, the Marine turned and left the hospital. Two days later a message come in from the North Carolina Marine Corps base informing the Brooklyn for his gather’s funeral. It turned out there had been two Marines with the same name and similar numbers in the camp. Someone in the personnel office had pulled out the wrong record.
But the wrong Marine had become the right son at the right time. And he proved, in a very human way, that there are people who care what happens to their fellow men.

Lesson six : How Dictionaries Are Made

Word List 单词表

widely adv.广泛地,普遍地
mainly adv.主要地
grammar n.语法书;语法
authority n.权威著作;学术权威
usage n.(词语的)惯用法
argument n.争论,争辨,争吵
firmly adv.坚定地,坚决地
confidence n.把握;自信心
uncommon adj.不普通的,不寻常的
edit v.编辑
editing n.编辑
editor n.编辑,编者
define v.给(词语等)下定义
definition n. (词语等的)定义
firsthand adj.第一手的,直接的
existing adj.现存的,目前的,现行的
amount n.数量
literature n.文献;文学
subject n.题目,题材,主题
occupy v.占(时间、空间、场所等)
decade n.10年
alphabetical adj.按字母表顺序的
sorting n.整理,分类
illustrate v.(用例子等)说明
represent v.体现,典型地反映;代表
carefully adv.仔细地;聚精会神地
hard-and-fast adj.(规则等)不可改变的
influence v.影响,对……起作用
given adj.特定的
ruling adj.占指导地位的;统治的
statement n.陈述,声明
record v.记录
various adj.各种各样的,不同的
author n.著作者,作家
historian n.历史学家,史学工作者
historical adj.历史(上)的
lawgiver n.拟定法典者,立法者
scatter v.撒播
guide v.引导,指导
bind(bound,bound) v.约束,束缚
invention n.发明(物),创造(物)
Proper Names 专有名词
S.I. Hayakawa S.I.早川(人名)
England英格兰(英国地名)
the United States 美国
Oxford 牛津

Useful Expressions 常用短语

offer to do sth.主动提出做某事
bring up抚养,养大
quarrel with (sb.) 与某人争吵
be out of one’s mind疯了
begin with以……开始
huge/great amount of大量的(不可数)
a (large) number of大量的(可数)
according to按照
that is to say也就是说
from…to从……到
regard…as看做,当做
set up制定
provide sth. for sb.给某人提供某物
look up查字典;(在同一地方时)拜访(某人)
Please look up the new word in your dictionary.
If you don’t know the word,look it up in the dictionary.
I looked up a classmate when I went to Shanghai.
what for 为什么
You are leaving us?What for?
What are you studying German for?
He knows clearly what he has come here for.
arrive at得出,做出,达到
The two parties finally arrived at an agreement in the end.
apply to 适用于
This law does not apply to foreign companies.
divide up(between/among)分配,分享,分担
They don’t know how to divide up the work.
base on/upon以……基础,把基础……放在
This film is based on a novel by a famous writer.

text
1.It is widely believed that every word has a correct meaning, that we learn these meanings from teachers and grammars, and that dictionaries and grammar books are the highest authority in matters of meaning and usage. Few people ask by what authority the writers of dictionaries and grammars say what they say.I once got into an argument with an English woman over the pronunciation of a word and offered to look it up in the dictionary. The English woman said firmly, “what for? I am English. I was born and brought up in England. The way I speak is English.” Such confidence about one’s own language is not uncommon among the English. In the united states , however, anyone who is willing to quarrel with the dictionary is regarded as out of his mind.
2.Let us see how dictionary are made and how the editors arrive at definitions. What follows applies only to those dictionary offices where firsthand research goes on ? not those in which editors simply copy existing dictionaries. The task of writing a dictionary begins with reading huge amounts of the literature of the period or subject that the dictionary is to cover. As the editors read, they copy on cards(介?短?作?钫Z,置于??之前) every unusual use of a common word , a large number of common words in their ordinary uses, and also the sentences in which each of these words appears.
3.That is to say, the context of each word is collected, along with the word itself. For a really big job of dictionary writing, such as the Oxford English Dictionary, millions of such cards are collected, and the task of editing occupies decades. As the cards are collected, they are arranged in alphabetical order. When the sorting is completed, there will be for each word (因主?太?,介?短?放在了主?的前面)anywhere from two or three to several hundred sentences (主?)(anywhere from to /anywhere between and 大?…到…之?), each on its card, which illustrate the meaning and use of the word.
4.To define a word, then, the dictionary editor places before him(前置) all the cards illustrating that word; each of the cards represents an actual use of the word by a writer of some importance. He reads the cards carefully, throws away some, rereads the rest, and divides them up according to what he thinks are the several senses of the word. Finally , he writes his definitions, following the hard-and-fast rule that each definition must be based on what the sentences in front of him show about the meanings of the word. The editor cannot be influenced by what he thinks a given word ought to mean. He must work according to the cards, or not at all.
5.The writing a dictionary, therefore, is not a task of setting up ruling statements about the “true meanings” of words, but a task of recording, to the best of one’s ability, what various words have meant to authors in the distant or immediate past. The writer of a dictionary is a historian , not a lawgiver. If, for example, we had been writing a dictionary in 1890, or even as late as 1919, we could have said that the word “ broadcast” means “to scatter” (seed, for example), but we could not have laid down that from 1919 on the most common meaning of the word should become “to send out programs by radio or television.” To regard the dictionary as an “authority,” therefore, is to look upon the dictionary writer as being able to see into the future, (look upon+??+as??/?里??是分?短?,?可以是名.形.介?短?)which neither he nor anyone else can do. In choosing our words when we speak or write, we can be guided by the historical record provided for us by the dictionary, but we should not be bound by it. Because new situations, new experiences , new inventions, new feelings are always making us give new uses to old words.

Lesson Seven : Love of Life

Word List 单词表

slowly adv. 缓慢地
shallow adj. 浅的
stream n. 溪流,小河
stream v.(像流水般)流动
earth n. 泥土
run v. (指液体)流动
bullet n. 子弹
(fall) over prep.被……绊倒
hey interj. 喂!(表示惊喜或引起注意)
struggle v. 挣扎,奋斗
limp v. 跛行,一瘸一拐地走
berry n. 浆果(如草莓、桑葚等)
tasteless adj.无味的
build v. 建造
build a fire 生火
sack n. 袋子
stagger v. 蹒跚,摇摇晃晃
darkness n. 黑暗
fall v. 降临,来临
restless adj. 没有得到休息的,不安定的
banquet n. 宴会
drag v. 慢吞吞地行进
deer n. 鹿
suck v.吮吸,啜饮
chew v. 咀嚼,嚼碎
strive(strove,striven) v. 努力奋斗
unwilling adj. 不愿意的,不情愿的
drive v. 迫使
empty v. (河流等)流入,流进
shining adj. 发光的,闪光的
vision n. 幻觉,幻象
wolf n. 狼
sick adj. 有病的,生病的
full adv. 很,非常,充分
ha interj. 瞧!(表示惊奇、惊喜、疑惑等)
laughing n. 笑,笑声
sound v. 听起来
crawl v.爬,爬行
knee n. 膝盖
hold v.使保持(某种状态)

Proper Names 专有名词
Jack London 杰克•伦敦(人名)
Bill 比尔(人名)
The Hudson Bay Company 哈得孙湾公司

Useful Expressions 常用短语

struggle to one’s feet (挣扎着)站起来
wait for 等待
wake up 醒来
leave…behind 留下,遗留,忘记带
dream of 梦见;梦想
turn back 回到原处
empty into 注入,流入
turn around 转身
recover from (从疾病等)恢复过来
be on hands and knees 四肢着地伏在地上
compared with 与……相比
Compared with that of the other students ,your pronunciation is beautiful.
be afraid of sth./sb. 害怕(某物或某人)
I’m afraid of the dog.
be afraid (that) 担心,恐怕
I’m afraid (that) he won’t come today.
be afraid of doing sth. 担心,惟恐
I’m afraid of hurting her.
I’m afaid to walk in the dark.
no longer /not…any longer 不再,再也不
He couldn’t wait any longer.
I’m no longer afraid.

text
1.Two men walked slowly, one after the other, through the shallow water of a stream. All they could see were stones and earth. The stream ran cold over their feet. They had blanket packs on the backs. They had guns, but no bullets; matches, but no food.
2.Suddenly the man who followed fell over a stone. He hurt his foot badly and called : “ Hey, Bill , I’ve hurt my foot.” Bill continued straight on without looking back.
3.The man was alone in the empty land, but he was not lost. He knew the way to their camp, where he would find food and bullets. He struggled to his feet and limped on. Bill would be waiting for him there, and together they would go south to the Hudson Bay Company. He had not eaten for two days. Often he stopped to pick some small berries and put them into his mouth. The berries were tasteless, and did not satisfy, but he knew he must eat them.
4.In the evening he built a fire and slept as a dead man. When he woke up, the man took out a small sack. It weighed fifteen pounds. He wasn’t sure if he could carry it any long. But he couldn’t leave him behind. He had to take it with him. He put it back into his pack, rose to his feet and staggered on.
5.His foot hurt, but it was nothing compared with hunger, which made him go on until darkness fell. His blanket was wet, but he knew only that he was hungry. Through his restless sleep he dreamed of banquets and of food. The man woke up cold and sick, and found himself lost. But the small sack was still with him. As he dragged himself along, the sack became heavier and heavier. The man opened the sack, which was full of small pieces of gold. He left half the gold on a rock.
6.Eleven days passed, days of rain and cold. One day he found the bones of a deer. There was no meat on them. The man broke the bones and sucked and chewed on them like an animal. Would he, too, be bones tomorrow? And why not? This was life. Only life hurt. There was no hurt in death. To die was to sleep. Then why was he not ready to die? He, as a man ,no longer strove. It was the life in him, unwilling to die , that drove him on.
7.One morning he woke up beside a river. Slowly he followed it with his eyes and saw it emptying into a shining sea. When he saw a ship on the sea, he closed his eyes. He knew there could be no ship, no sea, in this land. A vision, he told himself. He heard a noise behind him, and turned around. A wolf , old and sick, was coming slowly toward him. This was real, he thought. The man turned back, but the sea and the ship were still there. He didn’t understand. Had he been walking north, away from the camp, toward the sea? He stood up and started slowly toward the ship, knowing full well the sick wolf was following him. In the afternoon, he found some bones of a man. Beside the bones was a small sack of gold, like his own. So Bill had carried his gold to the end. He would carry Bill’s gold to the ship. Ha-ha! He would have the last laugh on Bill. His laughing sounded like the low cry of an animal. The wolf cried back. The man stopped suddenly and turned away. How could cried back. The man stopped suddenly and turned away. How could he laugh about Bill’s bones and take his gold?
8.The man was very sick, now. He crawled about, on hands and knees. He had lost everything ? his blanket, his gun, and his gold. Only the wolf stayed with him hour and hour. At last he could go on no further. He fell. The wolf came close to him, but the man was ready. He got on top of the wolf and held its mouth closed. Then he bit it with his last strength(力量). The wolf’s blood streamed into his mouth. Only love of life gave him enough strength. He held the wolf with his teeth and killed it , then he fell on his back and slept.
9.The man on the ship saw a strange object lying on the beach. It was moving toward them ? perhaps twenty feet an hour. The men went over to look and could hardly believe it was a man.
10.Three weeks later, when the man felt better, he told them his story. But there was one strange thing ? he seemed to be afraid that there wasn’t enough food on the ship. The men also noticed that he was getting fat. They gave him less food, but still he grew fatter with each day. Then one day they saw him put a lot of bread under his shirt. They examined his bed and found food under his blanket. The men understood. He would recover from it, they said.

Lesson Eight : A Fiddle and the Law

Word List(单词表)

fiddle n. (口语)小提琴
fiddle v. (口语)(用小提琴)演奏
fiddler n. (口语)小提琴手
special agent n. 特工
cabin n. 小屋,小木屋
get v. 抓获,捕获
armed adj. 武装的,持枪的
killer n. 杀人犯,杀手
broken adj. 被打碎了的
closely adv. 严密地,仔细地
government man n. (美国)联邦调查局特工
agent n. (政府机关的)特工
draw v. 吸(气),吸入
step v. 跨步,迈步
cheerful adj. 快活的,兴高采烈的
fireplace n. 壁炉
silently adv. 无声地,沉默地
silence n. 寂静,无言,沉默
bearded adj. 有胡须的
pa n. (口语)爸爸
assign v. 分配,指定,选派
violin n. 小提琴
play v. 演奏(乐器或音乐)
part n. 地区;部分
deeply adv. 极大地,深刻地
impress v. 给人留下深刻印象
instrument n. 乐器,仪器
aim v. 瞄准,对准
sweat n. 汗,汗水
sweat v. 出汗,流汗
forehead n. 额头,脑门
calmly adv.镇定地,冷静地
welcome adj. 受欢迎的
carefully adv. 仔细地,谨慎地
bow n.琴弓
unmoved adj. 无动于衷的
alert adj. 警惕的,警觉的
tune n. 曲调,歌曲
string n. 琴弦
sweet adj. 悦耳的,旋律优美的
note n. (乐器等的)音,调子
folk adj. 民间的,通俗的
glorious adj. (口语)非常愉快的,令人快乐的
enchant v. 使……着迷,迷倒……
defiance n. 违抗;藐视
first-class adj. 第一流的
sunshine n. 阳光
once adv. 一次
once more 再一次
dance v. 跳动,轻快地移动
quickly adv. 快速地,迅速地
eye v. 盯着,凝视
want v. 通缉(犯人)
amusement n. 兴趣;娱乐
worse off adj. (情况)更糟糕的,更贫困的
guy n. (美,口语)男人(guys家伙,包括女人)
nearby adj. 在附近的
log n. 木柴
deep adj. 专心的,全神贯注的
decent adj. 正派的
thick adj. (嗓音等)不清楚的,沙哑的
sheriff n. (美国的)县治安官
so long (美,口语)再见
relief n. (忧虑解除后的)轻松
appearance n. 外表,外貌
hiding n. 隐藏,躲藏
in hiding 在隐藏中
Proper Names(专有名词)
John J. Floherty 约翰•J•弗洛赫蒂(人名)
Cal Richards 卡尔•理查兹(人名)
Pappy Richards 帕皮•理查兹(人名)

Useful Expressions(常用短语)

draw a (deep) breath (深)吸一口气
point at 指着
look around 环顾四周
be assigned to do 被指派做某事
catch sight of 看见
speak up 大声说
aim at 瞄准
beat time 打拍子
break into 突然……起来
one after another 一个接一个
glance at 一瞥,看一眼
be filled with 充满
stay for dinner 留下来吃饭
speak of 提及,说起
be deep in thought 沉思
give oneself up to 向……自首
give way to 让路,为……所代替
After the explanation ,his doubts gave way to belief.
die away 逐渐消失
The wind died away and it began to rain.
as if 似乎
He spoke as if he were the prince himself.

text
1.Special Agent X came to a cabin about two miles up the mountain. He had come to get Cal Richards, an armed and dangerous killer. Through a broken window, he saw a man with a beard watching him closely. Agent X drew a deep breath. He stepped up to the cabin door with a cheerful "hello".
2.Beside the fireplace, an old man sat silently. Still standing near the window was the bearded man ? a gun in his hands.
3."Government man , aren't you?" said the man with the gun.
4."Yes," replied the agent with a friendly smile. "You must be Pappy Richards."
5."Sure." I'm Cal's pa. And you are not going to get him." The gun pointed at the G-man.
6.Agent X looked around the cabin. " I've been assigned to do it," he said. "But I can see he isn't here today. I guess I'll have to come again." Then he caught sight of a violin hanging on the wall. "Who plays the fiddle?" he asked.
7.For a moment there was silence. Then the old man by the fire spoke up. "Pappy," he said. "He's the best fiddler in these parts. You ought to hear him play Turkey in the Straw." The G-man seemed deeply impressed. "You don't say!真的呀! I play a little myself. Mind if I look at the violin?"
8.As he crossed the room to the instrument, he knew that the gun was still aimed at him. He felt sweat on his forehead, but he took the violin from the wall as calmly as if he were a welcome visitor. He turned it carefully and wiped off the bow. Then he broke into the lively music of Turkey in the straw. The old man began to beat time, tapping one foot on the dirt floor. But Pappy stood unmoved, gun in hand and eyes alert.
9.One tune after another Agent X played, occasionally glancing at Pappy. Suddenly the music changed, and from the strings came the sweet notes of an old folk song. The cabin was filled with glorious sound. Agent X was playing better than he had ever played in his life. Pappy Richards stood enchanted, the defiance in his eyes giving way to a look of wonder. The gun was now pointed toward the floor. When the final notes of the song died away, Papper placed the gun in a corner.
10."Well, stranger," Pappy said, "that was first-class fiddling. Maybe you'll stay for dinner and play some more for us."
11.After they had eaten, the three men sat in the spring sunshine outside the cabin. They talked about fiddle tunes and the fiddlers that Pappy and the old man had known here in the mountains.
12.They talked for an hour, and not once did anyone speak of the reason for G-man's visit. Once more the bow danced across the strings; and so another hour passed quickly. Still not a word was said about Cal Richards. Finally the agent said, "Sorry! I must be getting back to the village."
13.Pappy's friend eyed him for a moment and said, "How about Cal? You want him, don't you?" There was a touch of amusement in his voice.
14."Well, no," said the G-man with a smile. "I don't want him. The government wants him, and you know how it is when the government wants a men. It may take days or months or years to get him, but they'll get him. And the longer it takes, the worse off he is."
15."Does the government always get the guy it wants?"
16."No, not always. Sometimes he dies."
17.Pappy, sitting on a nearby log, was deep in thought. "see here感?@? , stranger," he interrupted suddenly. "I like the way you talk and I like the way you fiddle. I guess you're a decent guy." He paused as if it were hard to go on. Then, he said in a thick voice, "I ?well, I'll have a talk with Cal. I think he might give himself up tomorrow. You be at the sheriff's office at noon!"
18."Noon tomorrow!" said the agent, wondering if he looked as surprised as he felt. "So long until then." After he left, he wiped his sweating forehead and sighed with relief.
19.The next day as the village clock struck twice, announcing the hour of noon, a bearded man came up the street toward the sheriff's office. With him was a young fellow whose appearance told of many days in hiding.
20.The G-man was waiting.
21."Stranger," said Pappy. "Here is Cal, my son."
Lesson One The Time Message word list (单词表) message n. 要旨,要点 tricky adj. (工作、问题等)微妙的,棘手的;(人)狡猾的 beginning n. 开始;起初 semester n. (尤指美国大专院校的)学期 cover v. 处理 duty n. 任务 management n. 管理 number one adj. 最重要的;头号的 seriously adv. 真心地,当真地;认真地,严肃地 once conj. 一旦……(就……) weekly adj. 每周一次的 follow v. 遵照;沿用 following adj. 紧接着的 realistic adj. 现实可行的 essay n. 作文;短文 quiz n. 考查;测验 upset v. 打乱(计划等);打翻 ability n. 能力;才智 grade n. (考试或作业的)分数 achieve v. 获得 flexible adj. 灵活的 re-plan v. 重新计划 basis n. 基础;根据 project n. 课题;科研项目 mid-term adj. 期中的 solid adj. 扎实的 schedule n. 计划表 alive adj. 起作用的;现存的;活着的 assignment n. (指定的)作业 activity n. 活动 social adj. 社交的;交谊的 seem v. 似乎;好像 back adj. 以前的;过去的 proper names elwood n. chapman 埃尔伍德•n•查普曼(人名) Useful Expressions(常用短语) look ahead 看前面;考虑未来 at the beginning of 在……的开始 plenty of 大量的 have time on one's hands 有许多时间 towards the end of… 即将结束时 work for 为……效力 work against 对……不利 get the most out of sth. 充分利用……的机会 put… into practice 付诸实践 allow for 考虑到 at least 至少 in… case 在…… 情况下 on a weekly /daily basis 每周/每天 work out 制定出 seem to be 看来,好像 keep sth./sb. + adj. 使 ……保持某种状况 run out (of ) (被)用完,将尽   time is running out. i have run out of money. take… some time to do… 花…… 时间做… …    it will take us an hour to get there. depend on 取决于,随……而定   it depends on how many people are going so that 以便(用来引出目的状语从句)   tell me your telephone number so that i can call you when i have time. catch up on  赶上,补上  i have to catch up on my sleep. i didn't sleep much last night. text Time is tricky. It is difficult to control and easy to waste. When you look a head, you think you have more time than you need. For Example, at the beginning of a semester, you may feel that you have plenty of time on your hands, but toward the end of the term you may suddenly find that time is running out. You don't have enough time to cover all your duties (duty), so you get worried. What is the answer? Control! Time is dangerous. If you don't control it, it will control you. If you don't make it work for you, it will work against you. So you must become the master of time, not its servant. As a first-year college student, time management will be your number one Problem. Time is valuable. Wasting time is a bad habit. It is like a drug. The most time you waste, the easier it is to go on wasting time. If seriously wish to get the most out of college, you must put the time message into practice. Message1. Control time from the beginning. Time is today, not tomorrow of next week. Start your plan at the Beginning of the term. Message2. Get the notebook habit. Go and buy a notebook today, Use it to plan your study time each Day. Once a weekly study plan is prepared, follow the same pattern every week with small changes. Sunday is a good day to make the Plan for the following week. Message3. Be realistic. Often you know form experience how long it takes you to write a short essay, to study for a quiz, or to review for a final exam. When you plan time for these things, be realistic. Allow for unexpected things. Otherwise you entire plan may be upset. Message4. Plan at least one hour for each hour in class. How much study time you plan for each classroom hour depends on four things: (1) you ability, (2) the difficulty of the class, (3) the grades you hope to achieve, and (4) how well you use your study time. One thing, however, is Certain; you should plan at least one hour of study for each classroom hour, in many cases, two or three hours will be required. Message5. Keep you plan flexible. It is important that you re-plan your time on a weekly basis so that you can make certain changes when necessary. For example, before mid-term or final exams, you will want to give more time to reviewing. A good plan must be a little flexible so that special projects can be done well. Message6. Study for sometime each class day. Some solid work each day is better than many study hours one day and nothing the next. When you work out your schedule, try to include at least two study hours each day. This will not only keep the study habit alive but also keep you up to date on your class assignments. Message7. Free on Saturday-study on Sunday. It is good to stop all study activities for one full day. Many students choose Saturday for sports or social activities. Sunday, one the other hand, seems to the best study day for many students. It is a good day to catch up on back reading and other assignments. Lesson Two Hans Christian Andersen’s own fairy tale (1) word list(单词表) fairy tale n. 童话,神话 fairy n. 小仙子,小精灵 shoemaker n. 鞋匠 shoemaking n. 制鞋,补鞋 prince n.王子 princess n. 公主 poetry n.诗(总称) act v.表演 royal adj.王室的,皇家的 sensible adj.(建议、主意等)合情合理的,明智的;(人)明智的,明白事理的 stepfather n.继父 weaving n. 编织 weaver n.织布工 unhappiness n.不幸福,不愉快 tragedy n.悲剧,悲惨的事 dancer n.舞蹈演员 genius n.天才;创造力 warm v.(使……)变暖,暖和 for conj. 因为,由于 frost n.霜 woman-like adj.女人似的 figure n.身影,人影 writer n.作家,作者 helping adj.帮助的 finally adv.最后,最终 beautiful美妙动听的 high高音调的,尖声的 break(男孩的嗓音)青春期时变低沉 proper names(专有名词) Donald peattie唐纳德•皮蒂 louise peattie 路易丝•皮蒂 hans christian anderson汉斯•克里斯琴•安徒生 denmark丹麦 odense欧登塞(地名) copenhagen哥本哈根(地名) useful expressions(常用短语) once upon a time很久以前 ask a favour of sb. 请某人帮忙 look at看着 believe in 相信,信任 work hard at在……上下功夫 pay for sth.支付……的费用 be afraid to do sth. 害怕做某事 change/turn …into…把……改变成…… arrive in /at到达 for ever永远 from time to time不时的,常常 lend a helping hand to sb.帮某人一把 pretend to do sth.假装做某事 not… at all根本不,一点儿也不 he doesn’t know the meaning at all . start out出发,动身 they started out to look for the lost boy. we started out at 7 o’clock add sth. to sth.加上 please add your name to the list. out of sight从视线中消失(变得看不见) the ship was soon out of sight out of sight, out of mind.(谚语:不见就忘。) because of由于 we didn’t go to the cinema because of the rain. Text Once upon a time there was a poor boy who live in Denmark. His father, a shoemaker, had died, and his mother had married again One day the boy went to ask a favor of the prince of Denmark. When the prince asked him what he wanted, the boy said.” I want to write plays in poetry and to act at the royal theater.” The prince looked at the boy, at his big hands and feet, at his big nose and large serious eyes, and gave a sensible answer. “It is one thing to act in plays, another to write them. I tell you this for your own good; learn a useful trade like shoemaking.” So the boy, who was not sensible at all, went home. There he took what little money he had, said good-bye to his mother and his stepfather and started out to seek his fortune. He was sure that some day the name Hans Christian Andersen would be known all over Denmark To believe such a story one would have to believe in fairy tales! Hans Christian knew many such tales. He had heard some of them from his father, who had worked hard at his trade, but liked to read better than to make shoes. In the evenings, he had read aloud form the Arabian nights. His wife understood very little of the book, but the boy, pretending to sleep, understood every word. By day Hans Christian went to a house where old women worked as weavers. There he listened to the tales that the women told as they worked at their weaving. In those days, there were almost as many tales in Denmark as there were people to tell them. Among the tales told in the town of Odense, where Andersen was both in 1805 was one about a fairy who brought death to those who danced with her. To this tale, Hans Christian later added a story from his own life. Once, when his father was still alive, a young lady ordered a pair of red shoes. When she refused to pay for them, unhappiness filled the poor shoemaker’s house from that small tragedy and the story of the dancing fairy, the shoemaker’s son years later wrote the story of the dancing fairy, the shoemaker’s son years later wrote the story that millions of people now know as the red shoes. The genius of Andersen is that he put so much of everyday life into the wonder of his fairy tales. When Hans Christian’s mother was a little girl, she was sent out on the streets to beg. She did not want to beg , so she sat out of sight under one of the city bridges. She warmed her cold feet in her hands, for she had no shoes. She was afraid to go home. Years latter, her son, in his pity for her and his anger at the world, wrote the angry story she’s no good and the famous tale the little match girl. Through his genius, he changed every early experience, even his father’s death, into a fairy tale. One cold day the boy had stood looking at the white patterns formed on the window by the frost. His father showed him a white, woman-like figure among the frost patterns. “That is the snow queen,” said the shoemaker. “soon she will be coming for me.” A few months later he was dead. And years later, Andersen turned that sad experience into a fairy tale, the snow queen. After the prince told him to learn a trade, Hans Christian went to Copenhagen. He was just fourteen years old at the time. When he arrived in the city, he went to see as many important people as he could find ?dancers, writers and theater people of Copenhagen. But none of them lent a helping hand to the boy with the big hands, the big feet and the big nose. Finally, he had just seven pennies left. The boy had a beautiful high, clear voice. One day a music teacher heard him singing and decided to help him. He collected money from his fiends and gave it to the boy so that he could boy food and clothing while he studied singing. Hans Christian was happier than he had ever been in his life. But soon his boy’s voice broke. The beautiful high voice was gone forever. The boy soon found new friends who admired his genius. there was even a princess who gave him a little money from time to time for food and clothes. But Hans Christian bought little food and no clothes. Instead, he bought books and went to the theater. lesson Three Hans Christian Andersen’s own fairy tale(II) word list(单词表) attic n.阁楼,顶楼 view n.(从特定处看到的)景色 fund n.资金,现款 vividly adv.生动地 march v. 行进,行军 gallop v.(指马等或骑者)飞奔,奔驰 papercut n.剪纸 publish v.出版(书籍、期刊等) humor,humor n.(美/英)幽默 deeply adv.深刻地 heart n.实质,感情 emperor n.皇帝 kind-hearted adj.好心的,仁慈的 unhappy adj.不幸福的,不愉快的 happily adv. 幸福地,愉快地 comfort v.安慰(某人) awkward adj.(动作或形态)难看的;笨拙的 figure n.形态,体形 court n.宫廷 day n.时代 duck-yard n.鸭圈 swan n.天鹅 celebration n.庆祝 prince n.(某领域中的)优秀或杰出人物 full adj.丰富的 proper names(专有名词) jonas collin乔纳斯•科林(人名) europe欧洲 dickens(人名) victor hugo维克托•雨果(人名) useful expressions(常用短语) have a good view of清楚看到 make friends with sb.与某人交朋友 send sb.to school供某人上学 be full of充满 laugh at嘲笑 feel/be at ease with sb.与某人相处感到轻松惬意 ask for sth.请求或要求某物 translate…into…把……翻译成…… at last最后,终于 in turn轮流,依次 the president shook hands in turn with the people greeting him. come out出版 when will this book come out ? so…that如此……以至于 she is so fat that she can't move easily. look upon …as把……看做…… i looked upon you as a close friend. john is looked upon as the best basketball player in his class. be in sb.'s /sth.'s honour;be in honour of sb./sth. 向……表示敬意; 为庆祝……;为纪 念 a party will be held in honour of the visiting president. Text In Copenhagen, Hans Christian lived in an attic in an old house, where he had a good view of the city. But there was one big fact that he could not see right under his own nose. The plays and poetry that he wrote were not very good. Hans Christian made friends with a few kind people. Among them was Jonas Collin of the Royal Theater. This kind man collected funds from friends to send the young writer to school. Hans felt most at ease with children. He ate his dinner in turn at the homes of six friends. In each home the children begged him for stories . Hans told a tale so vividly that you could see and hear toy soldiers marching and toy horse galloping. And he could make the most wonderful papercuts. These are kept today in the Andersen Museum, which is in the house where he was born in Odense. Andersen remained single all his life. The good Collin family-three generations of them-became all the family he was ever to have. They all loved him, but they advised him not to write any more poetry and plays, and to try to get a government job. They talked as he later made the animals talk in his stories:” I tell you this for your own good,” said the Han to the Ugly Duckling,” you should learn to lay eggs like me.” In The Ugly Duckling Hans Christian told the story of his own life. When his first book of fairy tales was published in 1835, Andersen didn’t think it would be successful, but children read the stories and wanted more. So, encouraged by their interest, he began what we know today as his great work, for 37 year, a new book of Andersen’s fairy tales come out each Christmas. The books were full of everyday truth, of wonder, of sad beauty, of humor. Children an their parents had never read such tales before. Andersen’s tales ate a poet’s way of telling us the truth about our selves. He looked deeply into the heart of things. Even in a child’s toy lost in the street, he could see some story with the light of gold in it. All of us laugh at the humor of The Emperor’s New Cloths, but we remember the story every time men pretend to be something that they are not. Although he was now famous, he was more kind-hearted that ever. One day on the street he met a man who had once treated him badly. The old and unhappy man said that he was sorry for what he had done. Andersen forgave the man and comforted him. The prince who had told Andersen to learn a useful trade was now the King. He invited the writer to his palace and told him that he might ask for nay favor. Andersen replied simply,” But I don’t need anything at all.” He was already loved all over the world. The awkward figure and kind ugly face had become so famous that his friends, the children, recognized him wherever he was. His wherever he was. His books were translated into many different languages and read all over the world. He was received at the royal courts of Europe and admired by many kings. The greatest writers of the day, form dickens to Victor Hugo, looked upon him as one of themselves. Among them, he at last learned happily that “it doesn’t matter if you are born in a duck-yard, as long as you come from a swan’s egg” Happiest of all was the day he returned to the “suck-yard,” nearly 50 years after he had left it. All Odense took part in the great tales. A great dinner was held in his honor. That night, hundreds of people came to his window and celled to him. What was then in his full heart-that gentle heart that had been lonely for so long-was best expressed in his own words:” To God and man, my thanks, my love.” Lesson Four This Life Word List(单词表) script n.(戏剧、电影等)剧本,脚本 part n. (戏剧、电影等角色的)台词 look n.样子,表情 no adj.完全不是,绝不是 dishwasher n.洗碟工;洗碗机 heavy adj.繁重的;费力的 p.m. abbr.(post meridiem的缩写)下午,午后 Jewish adj.犹太族的 syllable n.音节 context n.上下文 armed adj.具备……知识或技能的;有……装备的 reread v.重读,再读 enormous adj.巨大的,极大的 contribution n.贡献 Proper Names(专有名词) Sidney Poitier 悉尼•波蒂埃(人名) John 约翰(人名) Astoria,Long Island 长岛的阿斯托里亚(地名) Useful Expressions (常用短语) see sb. doing sth.看见某人正在做某事 stare at 盯着 get off从……下来,下车 say to oneself 自言自语 be able to do能够做 think about sth.考虑某事 spend…time(in)doing花……时间做某事 make sb. do sth.让某人做某事 clear away清除 run across/into sb./sth.偶然碰到 a couple of几个 make a contribution to为……做出贡献 take sth. away (with sb.)带走 look for寻找 go over认真学习 begin to do sth.开始做某事 used to do sth.过去常常做某事 He used to go for a walk in the park when he was young. get/have an idea (of)知道,懂得 I have no idea what I should do. I’m sorry,I have no idea of that. Text It is the first time I have ever been on a stage-I don’t even know what a stage looks like ?but I’m up there now and I open this” script,” but I don’t know what it is. The director tells me to read the part of “John.” Everywhere I see “John” I must read everything under that. Then I see him sitting in a front seat staring at me with the strangest look. He says. “Get off the stage” I say, “What do you mean?” He says, “Just come on down off that stage and stop wasting my time. You’re no actor. You don’t even know how to read.” I leave and walk off down 135th Street saying to my self,”You can hardly read. You can’t be an actor and you’re not able to read.” I begin to think about what he’s said to me. Now I Know I can’t read too well. Here I am eighteen years of age, and if I live to be eighty, for the next sixty-two years I’m going to be a dishwasher. I’m not going to be able to make people notice me. During the next six month, I spent as much times possible reading. One of the restaurants I worked in during that period was in Astoria, long Island. The work was hard and heavy, but we would have most the dishes cleared away by 11:00 or 11:15 p.m. It was my custom to sit out near the kitchen door and read the newspaper. At the waiters ’table there was a old Jewish man who used to watch me trying go read that paper. I asked him one night what a word meant and he told me. I thanked him and went back to my paper. He went on watching me for a few seconds and then said “do you run across a lot of words you don’t understand?” I said “A lot-because I’m just beginning to learn to read well,” and he said, “I’ll sit with you here and work with you for a while.” So at about eleven every night when he sat sown for his meal, I would come out of the kitchen and sit down next to him and read articles from the front page of the paper. When I ran into a word I didn’t know (and I didn’t know half of article, become any word longer than a couple of syllables gave me trouble) he explained the meaning of the word and gave me the pronunciation. Then he’d send me back to the sentence so I could understand the word in context. Then I would take the paper away with me, armed now with the meaning of those words, and reread and reread the article so that the meaning of those words would get locked into my memory. Every evening we did that. I stayed there at that job for about five or six weeks and learned from him a way to study, and then I went off to other jobs. I have never been able to thank him properly because I never knew then what an enormous contribution he was making to my life. He was wonderful, and a little bit of him is in everything I do. After that, I always looked for the meaning of words, and when I ran into words I couldn’t pronounce and didn’t understand, I would work on them until I began to understand. I would keep going over and over the sentence they were in, and after a while I would begin to get an idea of what the word meant just by repeating the sentence. That became a habit, as did all the other things he left me with. Lesson Five Night Watch word list 单词表 watch n.看护,守候(病人) elderly adj. 年长的 collapse v. (因病,累等)晕倒 ambulance n. 救护车 rush v. 急速将……送往 repeatedly adv. 一再,反复地 wear v.磨损 emergency-room n. 急诊室 marine n. (美国海军陆战队)士兵或军官 station v.驻扎 station n.值班处 corps n.特种部队,兵团 jeep n.越野车,吉普车 wade v涉水而行 marsh n.沼泽地,湿地 military adj.军事的 enable v.使(人)能够…… reach v.到达……(某人)处,抵达(某地) lobby n.(旅馆、剧院、医院等的)大厅 serviceman n.军人 bedside n.病床边,床边 weak adj.虚弱的,软弱的 dimly adv.模糊地,蒙?地 oxygen n.氧气 tent n.(氧气)罩 wrap v. 裹……包…… limp adj.没劲的,无力的,没精神的 squeeze v.紧握;挤 encouragement n.鼓励 dimly-lit adj.光线暗淡的 ward n.病房 occasionally adv.偶然地,不时 clanking n.发出叮当声 tank n.(盛液体或气体的)箱,罐或桶 laughter n.笑声 night-staff n.夜班工作人员 exchange v.交换 moan n.呻吟声 snore n.鼾声,呼噜声 tightly adv.紧紧地 lifeless adj.无生命的,死的 sympathy n.同情 startle v.使……惊讶 base n.(军队等)基地,大本营 inform v.通知,告诉 funeral n.葬礼 personnel n.人事部,人员 human adj.有人情的,好心肠的 fellow n.(在名词前)身份相同的 proper names 专有名词 Roy popkin 罗伊•波普金(人名) Brooklyn布 鲁克林区(美国纽约市行政区名) north Carolina(美国)北卡罗来纳州 useful expressions 常用短语 rush sb. to… 快速送某人去…… in time及时 enable sb. to do sth.使得某人能做某事 take…to…带……去…… reach out one’s hand伸出某人的手 all through the night整个夜晚 pay attention to sth.注意 now and then偶尔,不时 hold (tightly) to sth.紧抓住 return to…回到…… on one’s way to…在去……的路上 come on醒过来,苏醒 the patient came to three hours after the operation. too …to do…如此……以至于不能…… she is too young to go to school. turn out that/to (be/do)原来是,到头来 it turned out that the man who called me this morning was my old classmate. the man who called me this morning turned out to be my old classmate. happen to发生于……身上 she is so thin and weak. What has happened to her? Text The story began an a downtown Brooklyn street corner An elderly man had collapsed while crossing the street, and an ambulance rushed him to Kings County Hospital. There, when he came to now and again, the man repeatedly called for his son. From worn letter found in his pocket, an emergency-room nurse learned that his son was a Marine stationed in North Carolina. It seemed there were no other relatives. Someone at the hospital called the red cross office in Brooklyn, and a request for the boy to rush to Brooklyn was sent to the red cross director of the north Carolina marine corps camp. Because time was short-the patient was dying-the red cross man and officer set out in a jeep. They found the young man wading through some marshes in a military exercise. He was rushed to the airport in time to catch the one plane that might enable him to reach him to reach his father. It was mid-evening when the young Marine walked into the entrance lobby of Kings county Hospital. A nurse took the tired, anxious serviceman to the bedside. “Your son is here,” she said to the old man. She had to repeat the words several times before the patient’s opened. The medicine he had been given because of the pain from his heart attack made his eyes weak and he only dimly saw the young man in Marine Corps uniform standing outside the oxygen tent. He reached out his hand. The Marine wrapped his strong fingers around the old man’s limp ones, squeezing a message of love and encouragement. The nurse brought a chair, so the marine could sit by the bed. Nights are long on hospitals, but all through the Marine the night the young Marine sat there in the dimly-lit ward, holding the old man’s hand and offering words of hope and strength. Occasionally, the nurse suggested that the Marine rest for a while. He refused. Whenever the nurse came into the ward, the Marine was there, but he paid no attention to her and the night noises of the hospital-the clanking of an oxygen tank, the laughter of night-staff members exchanging greetings, the cries and moans and snores of other patients. Now and then she heard him say a few gentle words. The dying man said nothing, only held tightly to his son through most of the night. It was nearly dawn when the patient died. The Marine placed on the bed the lifeless hand he had been holding, and went to tell the nurse. While she did what she had to do, he smoked a cigarette-his fist since he got to the hospital. Finally, she returned to the nurse’s station. Where he was waiting. She started to offer words of sympathy, but the Marine interrupted her. “Who was that man?” he asked. “He was you father” she answered, startled. “No, he wasn’t,” the Marine replied. “I never saw him before in my life.” “Why didn’t you say something when I took you to him?” the nurse asked. “I knew immediately there’d been a mistake, but I also knew he needed his son, and his son just wasn’t here. When I realized he was too sick to tell whether or not I was his son, I guessed he really needed mo. So I stayed.” With that, the Marine turned and left the hospital. Two days later a message come in from the North Carolina Marine Corps base informing the Brooklyn for his gather’s funeral. It turned out there had been two Marines with the same name and similar numbers in the camp. Someone in the personnel office had pulled out the wrong record. But the wrong Marine had become the right son at the right time. And he proved, in a very human way, that there are people who care what happens to their fellow men. Lesson six : How Dictionaries Are Made Word List 单词表 widely adv.广泛地,普遍地 mainly adv.主要地 grammar n.语法书;语法 authority n.权威著作;学术权威 usage n.(词语的)惯用法 argument n.争论,争辨,争吵 firmly adv.坚定地,坚决地 confidence n.把握;自信心 uncommon adj.不普通的,不寻常的 edit v.编辑 editing n.编辑 editor n.编辑,编者 define v.给(词语等)下定义 definition n. (词语等的)定义 firsthand adj.第一手的,直接的 existing adj.现存的,目前的,现行的 amount n.数量 literature n.文献;文学 subject n.题目,题材,主题 occupy v.占(时间、空间、场所等) decade n.10年 alphabetical adj.按字母表顺序的 sorting n.整理,分类 illustrate v.(用例子等)说明 represent v.体现,典型地反映;代表 carefully adv.仔细地;聚精会神地 hard-and-fast adj.(规则等)不可改变的 influence v.影响,对……起作用 given adj.特定的 ruling adj.占指导地位的;统治的 statement n.陈述,声明 record v.记录 various adj.各种各样的,不同的 author n.著作者,作家 historian n.历史学家,史学工作者 historical adj.历史(上)的 lawgiver n.拟定法典者,立法者 scatter v.撒播 guide v.引导,指导 bind(bound,bound) v.约束,束缚 invention n.发明(物),创造(物) Proper Names 专有名词 S.I. Hayakawa S.I.早川(人名) England英格兰(英国地名) the United States 美国 Oxford 牛津 Useful Expressions 常用短语 offer to do sth.主动提出做某事 bring up抚养,养大 quarrel with (sb.) 与某人争吵 be out of one’s mind疯了 begin with以……开始 huge/great amount of大量的(不可数) a (large) number of大量的(可数) according to按照 that is to say也就是说 from…to从……到 regard…as看做,当做 set up制定 provide sth. for sb.给某人提供某物 look up查字典;(在同一地方时)拜访(某人) Please look up the new word in your dictionary. If you don’t know the word,look it up in the dictionary. I looked up a classmate when I went to Shanghai. what for 为什么 You are leaving us?What for? What are you studying German for? He knows clearly what he has come here for. arrive at得出,做出,达到 The two parties finally arrived at an agreement in the end. apply to 适用于 This law does not apply to foreign companies. divide up(between/among)分配,分享,分担 They don’t know how to divide up the work. base on/upon以……基础,把基础……放在 This film is based on a novel by a famous writer. text 1.It is widely believed that every word has a correct meaning, that we learn these meanings from teachers and grammars, and that dictionaries and grammar books are the highest authority in matters of meaning and usage. Few people ask by what authority the writers of dictionaries and grammars say what they say.I once got into an argument with an English woman over the pronunciation of a word and offered to look it up in the dictionary. The English woman said firmly, “what for? I am English. I was born and brought up in England. The way I speak is English.” Such confidence about one’s own language is not uncommon among the English. In the united states , however, anyone who is willing to quarrel with the dictionary is regarded as out of his mind. 2.Let us see how dictionary are made and how the editors arrive at definitions. What follows applies only to those dictionary offices where firsthand research goes on ? not those in which editors simply copy existing dictionaries. The task of writing a dictionary begins with reading huge amounts of the literature of the period or subject that the dictionary is to cover. As the editors read, they copy on cards(介?短?作?钫Z,置于??之前) every unusual use of a common word , a large number of common words in their ordinary uses, and also the sentences in which each of these words appears. 3.That is to say, the context of each word is collected, along with the word itself. For a really big job of dictionary writing, such as the Oxford English Dictionary, millions of such cards are collected, and the task of editing occupies decades. As the cards are collected, they are arranged in alphabetical order. When the sorting is completed, there will be for each word (因主?太?,介?短?放在了主?的前面)anywhere from two or three to several hundred sentences (主?)(anywhere from to /anywhere between and 大?…到…之?), each on its card, which illustrate the meaning and use of the word. 4.To define a word, then, the dictionary editor places before him(前置) all the cards illustrating that word; each of the cards represents an actual use of the word by a writer of some importance. He reads the cards carefully, throws away some, rereads the rest, and divides them up according to what he thinks are the several senses of the word. Finally , he writes his definitions, following the hard-and-fast rule that each definition must be based on what the sentences in front of him show about the meanings of the word. The editor cannot be influenced by what he thinks a given word ought to mean. He must work according to the cards, or not at all. 5.The writing a dictionary, therefore, is not a task of setting up ruling statements about the “true meanings” of words, but a task of recording, to the best of one’s ability, what various words have meant to authors in the distant or immediate past. The writer of a dictionary is a historian , not a lawgiver. If, for example, we had been writing a dictionary in 1890, or even as late as 1919, we could have said that the word “ broadcast” means “to scatter” (seed, for example), but we could not have laid down that from 1919 on the most common meaning of the word should become “to send out programs by radio or television.” To regard the dictionary as an “authority,” therefore, is to look upon the dictionary writer as being able to see into the future, (look upon+??+as??/?里??是分?短?,?可以是名.形.介?短?)which neither he nor anyone else can do. In choosing our words when we speak or write, we can be guided by the historical record provided for us by the dictionary, but we should not be bound by it. Because new situations, new experiences , new inventions, new feelings are always making us give new uses to old words. Lesson Seven : Love of Life Word List 单词表 slowly adv. 缓慢地 shallow adj. 浅的 stream n. 溪流,小河 stream v.(像流水般)流动 earth n. 泥土 run v. (指液体)流动 bullet n. 子弹 (fall) over prep.被……绊倒 hey interj. 喂!(表示惊喜或引起注意) struggle v. 挣扎,奋斗 limp v. 跛行,一瘸一拐地走 berry n. 浆果(如草莓、桑葚等) tasteless adj.无味的 build v. 建造 build a fire 生火 sack n. 袋子 stagger v. 蹒跚,摇摇晃晃 darkness n. 黑暗 fall v. 降临,来临 restless adj. 没有得到休息的,不安定的 banquet n. 宴会 drag v. 慢吞吞地行进 deer n. 鹿 suck v.吮吸,啜饮 chew v. 咀嚼,嚼碎 strive(strove,striven) v. 努力奋斗 unwilling adj. 不愿意的,不情愿的 drive v. 迫使 empty v. (河流等)流入,流进 shining adj. 发光的,闪光的 vision n. 幻觉,幻象 wolf n. 狼 sick adj. 有病的,生病的 full adv. 很,非常,充分 ha interj. 瞧!(表示惊奇、惊喜、疑惑等) laughing n. 笑,笑声 sound v. 听起来 crawl v.爬,爬行 knee n. 膝盖 hold v.使保持(某种状态) Proper Names 专有名词 Jack London 杰克•伦敦(人名) Bill 比尔(人名) The Hudson Bay Company 哈得孙湾公司 Useful Expressions 常用短语 struggle to one’s feet (挣扎着)站起来 wait for 等待 wake up 醒来 leave…behind 留下,遗留,忘记带 dream of 梦见;梦想 turn back 回到原处 empty into 注入,流入 turn around 转身 recover from (从疾病等)恢复过来 be on hands and knees 四肢着地伏在地上 compared with 与……相比 Compared with that of the other students ,your pronunciation is beautiful. be afraid of sth./sb. 害怕(某物或某人) I’m afraid of the dog. be afraid (that) 担心,恐怕 I’m afraid (that) he won’t come today. be afraid of doing sth. 担心,惟恐 I’m afraid of hurting her. I’m afaid to walk in the dark. no longer /not…any longer 不再,再也不 He couldn’t wait any longer. I’m no longer afraid. text 1.Two men walked slowly, one after the other, through the shallow water of a stream. All they could see were stones and earth. The stream ran cold over their feet. They had blanket packs on the backs. They had guns, but no bullets; matches, but no food. 2.Suddenly the man who followed fell over a stone. He hurt his foot badly and called : “ Hey, Bill , I’ve hurt my foot.” Bill continued straight on without looking back. 3.The man was alone in the empty land, but he was not lost. He knew the way to their camp, where he would find food and bullets. He struggled to his feet and limped on. Bill would be waiting for him there, and together they would go south to the Hudson Bay Company. He had not eaten for two days. Often he stopped to pick some small berries and put them into his mouth. The berries were tasteless, and did not satisfy, but he knew he must eat them. 4.In the evening he built a fire and slept as a dead man. When he woke up, the man took out a small sack. It weighed fifteen pounds. He wasn’t sure if he could carry it any long. But he couldn’t leave him behind. He had to take it with him. He put it back into his pack, rose to his feet and staggered on. 5.His foot hurt, but it was nothing compared with hunger, which made him go on until darkness fell. His blanket was wet, but he knew only that he was hungry. Through his restless sleep he dreamed of banquets and of food. The man woke up cold and sick, and found himself lost. But the small sack was still with him. As he dragged himself along, the sack became heavier and heavier. The man opened the sack, which was full of small pieces of gold. He left half the gold on a rock. 6.Eleven days passed, days of rain and cold. One day he found the bones of a deer. There was no meat on them. The man broke the bones and sucked and chewed on them like an animal. Would he, too, be bones tomorrow? And why not? This was life. Only life hurt. There was no hurt in death. To die was to sleep. Then why was he not ready to die? He, as a man ,no longer strove. It was the life in him, unwilling to die , that drove him on. 7.One morning he woke up beside a river. Slowly he followed it with his eyes and saw it emptying into a shining sea. When he saw a ship on the sea, he closed his eyes. He knew there could be no ship, no sea, in this land. A vision, he told himself. He heard a noise behind him, and turned around. A wolf , old and sick, was coming slowly toward him. This was real, he thought. The man turned back, but the sea and the ship were still there. He didn’t understand. Had he been walking north, away from the camp, toward the sea? He stood up and started slowly toward the ship, knowing full well the sick wolf was following him. In the afternoon, he found some bones of a man. Beside the bones was a small sack of gold, like his own. So Bill had carried his gold to the end. He would carry Bill’s gold to the ship. Ha-ha! He would have the last laugh on Bill. His laughing sounded like the low cry of an animal. The wolf cried back. The man stopped suddenly and turned away. How could cried back. The man stopped suddenly and turned away. How could he laugh about Bill’s bones and take his gold? 8.The man was very sick, now. He crawled about, on hands and knees. He had lost everything ? his blanket, his gun, and his gold. Only the wolf stayed with him hour and hour. At last he could go on no further. He fell. The wolf came close to him, but the man was ready. He got on top of the wolf and held its mouth closed. Then he bit it with his last strength(力量). The wolf’s blood streamed into his mouth. Only love of life gave him enough strength. He held the wolf with his teeth and killed it , then he fell on his back and slept. 9.The man on the ship saw a strange object lying on the beach. It was moving toward them ? perhaps twenty feet an hour. The men went over to look and could hardly believe it was a man. 10.Three weeks later, when the man felt better, he told them his story. But there was one strange thing ? he seemed to be afraid that there wasn’t enough food on the ship. The men also noticed that he was getting fat. They gave him less food, but still he grew fatter with each day. Then one day they saw him put a lot of bread under his shirt. They examined his bed and found food under his blanket. The men understood. He would recover from it, they said. Lesson Eight : A Fiddle and the Law Word List(单词表) fiddle n. (口语)小提琴 fiddle v. (口语)(用小提琴)演奏 fiddler n. (口语)小提琴手 special agent n. 特工 cabin n. 小屋,小木屋 get v. 抓获,捕获 armed adj. 武装的,持枪的 killer n. 杀人犯,杀手 broken adj. 被打碎了的 closely adv. 严密地,仔细地 government man n. (美国)联邦调查局特工 agent n. (政府机关的)特工 draw v. 吸(气),吸入 step v. 跨步,迈步 cheerful adj. 快活的,兴高采烈的 fireplace n. 壁炉 silently adv. 无声地,沉默地 silence n. 寂静,无言,沉默 bearded adj. 有胡须的 pa n. (口语)爸爸 assign v. 分配,指定,选派 violin n. 小提琴 play v. 演奏(乐器或音乐) part n. 地区;部分 deeply adv. 极大地,深刻地 impress v. 给人留下深刻印象 instrument n. 乐器,仪器 aim v. 瞄准,对准 sweat n. 汗,汗水 sweat v. 出汗,流汗 forehead n. 额头,脑门 calmly adv.镇定地,冷静地 welcome adj. 受欢迎的 carefully adv. 仔细地,谨慎地 bow n.琴弓 unmoved adj. 无动于衷的 alert adj. 警惕的,警觉的 tune n. 曲调,歌曲 string n. 琴弦 sweet adj. 悦耳的,旋律优美的 note n. (乐器等的)音,调子 folk adj. 民间的,通俗的 glorious adj. (口语)非常愉快的,令人快乐的 enchant v. 使……着迷,迷倒…… defiance n. 违抗;藐视 first-class adj. 第一流的 sunshine n. 阳光 once adv. 一次 once more 再一次 dance v. 跳动,轻快地移动 quickly adv. 快速地,迅速地 eye v. 盯着,凝视 want v. 通缉(犯人) amusement n. 兴趣;娱乐 worse off adj. (情况)更糟糕的,更贫困的 guy n. (美,口语)男人(guys家伙,包括女人) nearby adj. 在附近的 log n. 木柴 deep adj. 专心的,全神贯注的 decent adj. 正派的 thick adj. (嗓音等)不清楚的,沙哑的 sheriff n. (美国的)县治安官 so long (美,口语)再见 relief n. (忧虑解除后的)轻松 appearance n. 外表,外貌 hiding n. 隐藏,躲藏 in hiding 在隐藏中 Proper Names(专有名词) John J. Floherty 约翰•J•弗洛赫蒂(人名) Cal Richards 卡尔•理查兹(人名) Pappy Richards 帕皮•理查兹(人名) Useful Expressions(常用短语) draw a (deep) breath (深)吸一口气 point at 指着 look around 环顾四周 be assigned to do 被指派做某事 catch sight of 看见 speak up 大声说 aim at 瞄准 beat time 打拍子 break into 突然……起来 one after another 一个接一个 glance at 一瞥,看一眼 be filled with 充满 stay for dinner 留下来吃饭 speak of 提及,说起 be deep in thought 沉思 give oneself up to 向……自首 give way to 让路,为……所代替 After the explanation ,his doubts gave way to belief. die away 逐渐消失 The wind died away and it began to rain. as if 似乎 He spoke as if he were the prince himself. text 1.Special Agent X came to a cabin about two miles up the mountain. He had come to get Cal Richards, an armed and dangerous killer. Through a broken window, he saw a man with a beard watching him closely. Agent X drew a deep breath. He stepped up to the cabin door with a cheerful "hello". 2.Beside the fireplace, an old man sat silently. Still standing near the window was the bearded man ? a gun in his hands. 3."Government man , aren't you?" said the man with the gun. 4."Yes," replied the agent with a friendly smile. "You must be Pappy Richards." 5."Sure." I'm Cal's pa. And you are not going to get him." The gun pointed at the G-man. 6.Agent X looked around the cabin. " I've been assigned to do it," he said. "But I can see he isn't here today. I guess I'll have to come again." Then he caught sight of a violin hanging on the wall. "Who plays the fiddle?" he asked. 7.For a moment there was silence. Then the old man by the fire spoke up. "Pappy," he said. "He's the best fiddler in these parts. You ought to hear him play Turkey in the Straw." The G-man seemed deeply impressed. "You don't say!真的呀! I play a little myself. Mind if I look at the violin?" 8.As he crossed the room to the instrument, he knew that the gun was still aimed at him. He felt sweat on his forehead, but he took the violin from the wall as calmly as if he were a welcome visitor. He turned it carefully and wiped off the bow. Then he broke into the lively music of Turkey in the straw. The old man began to beat time, tapping one foot on the dirt floor. But Pappy stood unmoved, gun in hand and eyes alert. 9.One tune after another Agent X played, occasionally glancing at Pappy. Suddenly the music changed, and from the strings came the sweet notes of an old folk song. The cabin was filled with glorious sound. Agent X was playing better than he had ever played in his life. Pappy Richards stood enchanted, the defiance in his eyes giving way to a look of wonder. The gun was now pointed toward the floor. When the final notes of the song died away, Papper placed the gun in a corner. 10."Well, stranger," Pappy said, "that was first-class fiddling. Maybe you'll stay for dinner and play some more for us." 11.After they had eaten, the three men sat in the spring sunshine outside the cabin. They talked about fiddle tunes and the fiddlers that Pappy and the old man had known here in the mountains. 12.They talked for an hour, and not once did anyone speak of the reason for G-man's visit. Once more the bow danced across the strings; and so another hour passed quickly. Still not a word was said about Cal Richards. Finally the agent said, "Sorry! I must be getting back to the village." 13.Pappy's friend eyed him for a moment and said, "How about Cal? You want him, don't you?" There was a touch of amusement in his voice. 14."Well, no," said the G-man with a smile. "I don't want him. The government wants him, and you know how it is when the government wants a men. It may take days or months or years to get him, but they'll get him. And the longer it takes, the worse off he is." 15."Does the government always get the guy it wants?" 16."No, not always. Sometimes he dies." 17.Pappy, sitting on a nearby log, was deep in thought. "see here感?@? , stranger," he interrupted suddenly. "I like the way you talk and I like the way you fiddle. I guess you're a decent guy." He paused as if it were hard to go on. Then, he said in a thick voice, "I ?well, I'll have a talk with Cal. I think he might give himself up tomorrow. You be at the sheriff's office at noon!" 18."Noon tomorrow!" said the agent, wondering if he looked as surprised as he felt. "So long until then." After he left, he wiped his sweating forehead and sighed with relief. 19.The next day as the village clock struck twice, announcing the hour of noon, a bearded man came up the street toward the sheriff's office. With him was a young fellow whose appearance told of many days in hiding. 20.The G-man was waiting. 21."Stranger," said Pappy. "Here is Cal, my son."
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