新编英语教程第二册Unit11

ffhappy 2006-03-15 8438 阅读
分享

Unit 11

DIALOGUE I

The Young on the Old

A: Isn't it Luo Wei? You've certainly changed beyond recognition!
B: Hi, Li Xia, you've grown from a tomboy into a graceful lady!
A: It was ten years ago that we first went to school together, wasn't it? I think it incredible that the well-groomed young man before me should have been the number one mischief-maker in the class.
B: How time flies!
A: I'm really surprised at how time changes people for the better, including you. Ha!
B: Don't be so sure of that. Time can bring aches and pains, too. It all depends on whether you grow from adolescence into adulthood or from adulthood into old age.
A: From adulthood into old age. That'll be terrible, won't it? I simply can't imagine what it'll be like to grow old.
B: Perhaps you'll be regarded as a burden to your children and the society forty years from now. Who knows?
A: Don't be so pessimistic. I don't suppose people here will let that happen.
B: But now and then there are cases of senior citizens being neglected or maltreated by their children. Recently there was a news report about an old man who'd been badly treated since retirement. The local people couldn't bear to see the old man suffer so much, and it was his neighbours who came to his rescue.
A: I read about that, too. It was just outrageous that his children should have refused to take care of him.
B: They ought to be brought to trial at the people's moral court and be punished in some way.
A: Anyway, they've been condemned by public opinion. I hope they have come to their senses.
B: Who knows whether or not I'll suffer the same fate as that poor old man! At the thought that one day I'll be too old to take care of myself, I can't help feeling disheartened.
A: We shouldn't think in that way actually. Everybody ages. Old age's nobody's fault. As we grow physically older, we need to keep ourselves psychologically young, and to contribute our experience and mature judgment to society.
B: I suppose you are right. I'll make myself useful to the community with my knowledge. I can't imagine myself doing nothing all day long. I don't mind what I do, but I need to be doing something useful. I'll pursue further education to keep my knowledge updated and my brain healthy.
A: I'm sure colleges and universities will have departments offering courses especially tailored to meet the needs of senior citizens. As a matter of fact, in a few places, they've already started giving courses in collecting, painting, calligraphy, things like that.
B: Yes, I've also heard there are places where old people have their own clubs and associations, such as the shadow boxing society and slow-dancing clubs.
A: So we don't have to worry about life in old age. I'm quite sure that by the time we retire, we'll live a rich and full life. As we'll be able to afford more time, we'll even travel around the world.

DIALOGUE II

Dialogue:

Three students are talking outside the library.
A: Well, that's enough work for today. I'd better be going home now.
B: Yes, I must be off, too. By the way, you've heard about Frank, I suppose.
C: No, I haven't heard a thing. I haven't seen him for about a month. What's happened?
A: What's happened to him?
B: Well, nothing bad. He's just won a scholarship to go to France next year!
C: Has he? How fantastic! That's really good news.
A: What a surprise! I must remember to congratulate him next time I see him.
C: He must be very pleased with himself. Incidentally, talking about scholarships, guess what I heard this morning.
B: What?
C: Well, poor Jane! She didn't pass her exams again, so she's been refused a scholarship.
A: Oh, no! That's dreadful. This is the third time she's tried to get a scholarship. This was her last chance, too.
B: She must be very miserable.
A: She certainly doesn't deserve to have failed. She's always worked hard.
B: I suppose she's not very good at sitting for exams. Some people do get very nervous. I think I'll go round and see her, and to cheer her up a bit.
A: Well, give her my regards, won't you?
B: Yes, of course.
C: Be seeing you, then. Bye.
A & B: Bye. See you!

READING

The Virtue Called Devotion

My grandmother is ninety-four now, and she doesn't hear much of what we say to her any more - even when we shout. At times she is so childishly demanding that we can hardly put up with her. Other times, she is so depressed at the state of the world that it is impossible to cheer her up. She is hard to live with.
Grandma lives with my mother and father. They have been looking after her for years. When it became apparent that Grandma could no longer take care of herself, she was moved into my parents' roomy home. She misses her little house and the amount of freedom she had, but she was terribly lonely there. Now she sees her family as often as she pleases.
When Grandma's abilities to see, hear, and walk adequately began to fail, numerous family meetings were held to discuss what to do. No one wanted to live with her; that was evident. We talked of placing her in a retirement home, but that idea was quickly discarded. Although Grandma would be with more people her own age, she would see even less of her family - and that would break her heart. Besides, the really good homes were extremely expensive, and the inexpensive ones were unappealing.
Mother flatly stated that Grandma would not end up in a nursing home. When the time came, Grandma would take up residence in her home. When Grandma was eighteen, she had had to quit school to look after her ailing parents, and she had loyally cared for them until their deaths. And Mother was not about to allow her mother to age away in unfamiliar surroundings. I admire my mother greatly for this decision. It was not an easy one for her, but it was a clear one. When so many others are heedlessly shunning the responsibility of aging parents, my mother stands out with strength.
In many lands, from the so-called primitive cultures to the highly developed ones, the eldest of the family is treated respectfully as the head of the household, at least until he or she becomes too old to make logical decisions. After that time, they are cared for by other members of the family for the rest of their days. Years ago in some cultures, I have heard, they were taken out to the wilderness and left to die at the hands of nature. Although this sounds cruel and heartless, I sometimes wonder if it was any crueller than today's practice of placing them in a strange environment to pine away from loneliness and confusion.
Many of the old folks who live in nursing homes have sick and feeble bodies. And they need constant attention to survive. But think about it! How enthusiastic about living would you be if your children had to pay perfect strangers to keep your body functioning? What would be the point of living? The indignity of it would be almost unbearable.
My own mother is still quite vigorous and active. She is enthusiastic about the future and is making many long-range plans. But someday she will be old and feeble. And one day, one of her five children, possibly me, will know that the time has come to care for an aging parent. We talk about this often, and I jokingly tell her that I will take her to the mountain and leave her there. She sometimes responds with this story:
"One day, a young man saw his father walking down the road lugging a large basket. When he got closer, the young man could see that his old grandfather was in the basket.
"'Where are you taking Grandpa, Father?' he asked.
"I'm taking him to the canyon,' his father said. 'He's old and mean and no good for anything now, so I'm going to throw him over the cliff.'
"'Okay, Father, you go right ahead,' the young man said, 'but be sure to save the basket. Someday I shall need it for you.'"
Someday we, too, will be old and feeble. Let us hope that loving families will not forget the virtue called devotion.

The Changing Concept of Family in America

Not long ago, Americans had a pretty good idea of what "family" meant. But today, with people living together in so many different combinations, "family" is much harder to define. When it comes to family values, many Americans may be saying one thing and doing another. The real picture is that the American family is suffering a crisis of collapsing. The American family is no longer what it used to be, though many Americans claim that they place the highest value on family life.
Researchers have been asking Americans about their families for over half a century, and Americans have always replied that the family takes priority over everything else in their lives. But if you watch what Americans do, traditional family relationships are in trouble. Research indicates that if current divorce rates continue, about two out of three marriages that begin this year will not survive as long as both spouses live. Besides, the proportion of American adults who are married is decreasing, the share of out-of-wedlock births has soared, and most children under age eighteen will spend part of their childhood living with only one parent.
The truth is that many, if not most, Americans will sacrifice traditional family ties for activities which they claim are more important. It is common for Americans to let the pursuit of more individualistic goals interfere with their family life. Worse still, many Americans are far more materialistic and self-centered than they are willing to admit.


The family is of nature's masterpieces.
-- George Santayana

To the family -- that dear octopus from whose tentacles we never
quite escape, nor, in our inmost hearts, ever quite wish to.
-- Dodie Smith
Unit 11 DIALOGUE I The Young on the Old A: Isn't it Luo Wei? You've certainly changed beyond recognition! B: Hi, Li Xia, you've grown from a tomboy into a graceful lady! A: It was ten years ago that we first went to school together, wasn't it? I think it incredible that the well-groomed young man before me should have been the number one mischief-maker in the class. B: How time flies! A: I'm really surprised at how time changes people for the better, including you. Ha! B: Don't be so sure of that. Time can bring aches and pains, too. It all depends on whether you grow from adolescence into adulthood or from adulthood into old age. A: From adulthood into old age. That'll be terrible, won't it? I simply can't imagine what it'll be like to grow old. B: Perhaps you'll be regarded as a burden to your children and the society forty years from now. Who knows? A: Don't be so pessimistic. I don't suppose people here will let that happen. B: But now and then there are cases of senior citizens being neglected or maltreated by their children. Recently there was a news report about an old man who'd been badly treated since retirement. The local people couldn't bear to see the old man suffer so much, and it was his neighbours who came to his rescue. A: I read about that, too. It was just outrageous that his children should have refused to take care of him. B: They ought to be brought to trial at the people's moral court and be punished in some way. A: Anyway, they've been condemned by public opinion. I hope they have come to their senses. B: Who knows whether or not I'll suffer the same fate as that poor old man! At the thought that one day I'll be too old to take care of myself, I can't help feeling disheartened. A: We shouldn't think in that way actually. Everybody ages. Old age's nobody's fault. As we grow physically older, we need to keep ourselves psychologically young, and to contribute our experience and mature judgment to society. B: I suppose you are right. I'll make myself useful to the community with my knowledge. I can't imagine myself doing nothing all day long. I don't mind what I do, but I need to be doing something useful. I'll pursue further education to keep my knowledge updated and my brain healthy. A: I'm sure colleges and universities will have departments offering courses especially tailored to meet the needs of senior citizens. As a matter of fact, in a few places, they've already started giving courses in collecting, painting, calligraphy, things like that. B: Yes, I've also heard there are places where old people have their own clubs and associations, such as the shadow boxing society and slow-dancing clubs. A: So we don't have to worry about life in old age. I'm quite sure that by the time we retire, we'll live a rich and full life. As we'll be able to afford more time, we'll even travel around the world. DIALOGUE II Dialogue: Three students are talking outside the library. A: Well, that's enough work for today. I'd better be going home now. B: Yes, I must be off, too. By the way, you've heard about Frank, I suppose. C: No, I haven't heard a thing. I haven't seen him for about a month. What's happened? A: What's happened to him? B: Well, nothing bad. He's just won a scholarship to go to France next year! C: Has he? How fantastic! That's really good news. A: What a surprise! I must remember to congratulate him next time I see him. C: He must be very pleased with himself. Incidentally, talking about scholarships, guess what I heard this morning. B: What? C: Well, poor Jane! She didn't pass her exams again, so she's been refused a scholarship. A: Oh, no! That's dreadful. This is the third time she's tried to get a scholarship. This was her last chance, too. B: She must be very miserable. A: She certainly doesn't deserve to have failed. She's always worked hard. B: I suppose she's not very good at sitting for exams. Some people do get very nervous. I think I'll go round and see her, and to cheer her up a bit. A: Well, give her my regards, won't you? B: Yes, of course. C: Be seeing you, then. Bye. A & B: Bye. See you! READING The Virtue Called Devotion My grandmother is ninety-four now, and she doesn't hear much of what we say to her any more - even when we shout. At times she is so childishly demanding that we can hardly put up with her. Other times, she is so depressed at the state of the world that it is impossible to cheer her up. She is hard to live with. Grandma lives with my mother and father. They have been looking after her for years. When it became apparent that Grandma could no longer take care of herself, she was moved into my parents' roomy home. She misses her little house and the amount of freedom she had, but she was terribly lonely there. Now she sees her family as often as she pleases. When Grandma's abilities to see, hear, and walk adequately began to fail, numerous family meetings were held to discuss what to do. No one wanted to live with her; that was evident. We talked of placing her in a retirement home, but that idea was quickly discarded. Although Grandma would be with more people her own age, she would see even less of her family - and that would break her heart. Besides, the really good homes were extremely expensive, and the inexpensive ones were unappealing. Mother flatly stated that Grandma would not end up in a nursing home. When the time came, Grandma would take up residence in her home. When Grandma was eighteen, she had had to quit school to look after her ailing parents, and she had loyally cared for them until their deaths. And Mother was not about to allow her mother to age away in unfamiliar surroundings. I admire my mother greatly for this decision. It was not an easy one for her, but it was a clear one. When so many others are heedlessly shunning the responsibility of aging parents, my mother stands out with strength. In many lands, from the so-called primitive cultures to the highly developed ones, the eldest of the family is treated respectfully as the head of the household, at least until he or she becomes too old to make logical decisions. After that time, they are cared for by other members of the family for the rest of their days. Years ago in some cultures, I have heard, they were taken out to the wilderness and left to die at the hands of nature. Although this sounds cruel and heartless, I sometimes wonder if it was any crueller than today's practice of placing them in a strange environment to pine away from loneliness and confusion. Many of the old folks who live in nursing homes have sick and feeble bodies. And they need constant attention to survive. But think about it! How enthusiastic about living would you be if your children had to pay perfect strangers to keep your body functioning? What would be the point of living? The indignity of it would be almost unbearable. My own mother is still quite vigorous and active. She is enthusiastic about the future and is making many long-range plans. But someday she will be old and feeble. And one day, one of her five children, possibly me, will know that the time has come to care for an aging parent. We talk about this often, and I jokingly tell her that I will take her to the mountain and leave her there. She sometimes responds with this story: "One day, a young man saw his father walking down the road lugging a large basket. When he got closer, the young man could see that his old grandfather was in the basket. "'Where are you taking Grandpa, Father?' he asked. "I'm taking him to the canyon,' his father said. 'He's old and mean and no good for anything now, so I'm going to throw him over the cliff.' "'Okay, Father, you go right ahead,' the young man said, 'but be sure to save the basket. Someday I shall need it for you.'" Someday we, too, will be old and feeble. Let us hope that loving families will not forget the virtue called devotion. The Changing Concept of Family in America Not long ago, Americans had a pretty good idea of what "family" meant. But today, with people living together in so many different combinations, "family" is much harder to define. When it comes to family values, many Americans may be saying one thing and doing another. The real picture is that the American family is suffering a crisis of collapsing. The American family is no longer what it used to be, though many Americans claim that they place the highest value on family life. Researchers have been asking Americans about their families for over half a century, and Americans have always replied that the family takes priority over everything else in their lives. But if you watch what Americans do, traditional family relationships are in trouble. Research indicates that if current divorce rates continue, about two out of three marriages that begin this year will not survive as long as both spouses live. Besides, the proportion of American adults who are married is decreasing, the share of out-of-wedlock births has soared, and most children under age eighteen will spend part of their childhood living with only one parent. The truth is that many, if not most, Americans will sacrifice traditional family ties for activities which they claim are more important. It is common for Americans to let the pursuit of more individualistic goals interfere with their family life. Worse still, many Americans are far more materialistic and self-centered than they are willing to admit. The family is of nature's masterpieces. -- George Santayana To the family -- that dear octopus from whose tentacles we never quite escape, nor, in our inmost hearts, ever quite wish to. -- Dodie Smith
3g.bigear.cn 用手机随时随地学英语
分享